Page 44 of 71 FirstFirst ... 34394041424344454647484954 ... LastLast
Results 861 to 880 of 1405
  1. #861  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    Perhaps someone will explain it for me. Perhaps someone will explain it for you. That would be nice.
    Anyone? Please?
  2. #862  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    [My niece rescued clothes and papers from her house. Her dogs are dead. The house will be razed.]
    whmurray-
    Somehow I missed that you had family down in New Orleans. You don't know me from Adam, but I sincerely wish your family the best as they recover from this disaster. I hope they get all the help they need and can again be made whole.
  3. #863  
    Quote Originally Posted by phurth
    Frankly there's been an awful lot of rumor and innuendo spread here both directly and indirectly by linking to very questionable sources. I've been doing a lot of posting here today to try and add information and shed light on what exactly has been going on (as always, based on info I've been able to find in reliable media sources). An earlier poster charged that "The USS Battaan's help was turned away from New Orleans at the very moment its need was for it was greatest." Though the poster very well might not have known it at the time, we now can see this was not true.

    I will point out that earlier today I did say that firing was too good for the FEMA director, but if pointing out ommissions or downright falsehoods makes me an apologist in your eyes, well you can believe whatever you choose.

    Phurth -- the Chicago Triune story is accurately excerpted.

    The line you quote refers both to the Bataan being relocated to Biloxi MS., and the other allegations of aid unable to be delivered because FEMA obstruction.

    Regarding the Bataan, though the ship had at its own initative already gotten to New Orleans by following the hurricane, and had begun essential work there (where the immediate peril was clearly most grave) FEMA ordered them to stop operations -- loading up its landing craft and helicopters and doctors and watermaking equipment and electric generators -- and instead go to assist Biloxi MS. (where a similar ship BTW, the USS IWO Jima, was also headed).

    Could you please point me to where in this story it says any such thing? I re-read it several times and couldn't find that. Whether the Bataan could have or should have done more in N.O., exaggeration doesn't help make things clearer.

    The following is an excerpt from the Chicago Tribune story:


    "Captain ready, waiting

    "Could we do more?" said Capt. Nora Tyson, commander of the Bataan. "Sure. I've got sailors who could be ...distributing water and food and stuff. But I can't force myself on people."

    (words not included in excerpt: "or on the beach plucking through garbage")


    I read those words: "I can't force myself on people" to mean that the Captain wanted to continue working on behalf of the New Orleans survivors. The captain's own idependent observation and the observation of her crew supported that desire to continue with the work that they had already begun.

    FEMA told that captain they they were not needed in New Orleans -- FEMA ordered the Captain of that ship to reload its crew and equipment, and that they should move to Biloxi MS.

    I welcome another interpretation of those words.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  4. #864  
    Quote Originally Posted by phurth
    whmurray-
    Somehow I missed that you had family down in New Orleans. You don't know me from Adam, but I sincerely wish your family the best as they recover from this disaster. I hope they get all the help they need and can again be made whole.
    Sir, my family are middle class. My brothers and sisters, my nieces and my nephews, are attorneys, jurists, teachers; they are more than able to care for themselves and theirs. This is not about my family. It is about my city and my people.

    This is about evil. This is about those "left behind." This is about the poor, the old, the young, and "the colored" that were not fed, not given water, not given sanitation, permitted, not to say caused, to die because the Governor of the State of Louisiana and the President of the United States were afraid, afraid to be seen as sympathetic to "looters." This is not about family but humanity.

    The left behind were degraded. I cannot swear that they are not guilty of what they stand accused. I was not there. Had I been there, I am not sure that I would not have behaved as they are accused of behaving, though I am sure none of you would have. But they stand accused of such incredible horrors as we can hardly speak. To whatever extent they are guilty, none of them would have behaved so last week. None of them would have behaved so had we met our minimal obligations to them.

    What I am suggesting is so terrible that we cannot acknowledge it. If we do, who are we? We pretend. But we know. We know. Know. For days we have sought another explanation. We keep hoping and apologising for those we have elected to represent us. They, we, cannot have been so wicked. There must be another excuse. Sorry. We have run out. It is time to acknowledge what happened and our responsibilty for it.
  5. #865  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    This is not about George W. Bush. Get over it. Stop defending him and start asking yourself what the eff is going on.
    Read the linked piece by Mr. Stein. "is not about George W. Bush" pretty much sums it up.
  6. #866  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE
    Phurth -- the Chicago Triune story is accurately excerpted.
    Yes, I'm not saying you excerpted inaccurately, but I found your summaries were misleading. Such as:
    Its captain appealed to FEMA to be allowed to help.
    When the story said:
    "Could we do more?" said Capt. Nora Tyson, commander of the Bataan. "Sure. I've got sailors who could be ...distributing water and food and stuff. But I can't force myself on people."
    Clearly the captain felt he (?) could or should have done more. I think it's misleading to assume that an active appeal to FEMA to be allowed to remain and help was made, though. It simply does not say that.
    The line you quote refers both to the Bataan being relocated to Biloxi MS., and the other allegations of aid unable to be delivered because FEMA obstruction.
    Perhaps that's what you meant, but it's not what you wrote. You wrote:
    The USS Battaan's help was turned away from New Orleans at the very moment its need was for it was greatest.
    Regarding the Bataan, though the ship had at its own initative already gotten to New Orleans by following the hurricane, and had begun essential work there (where the immediate peril was clearly most grave) FEMA ordered them to stop operations -- loading up its landing craft and helicopters and doctors and watermaking equipment and electric generators -- and instead go to assist Biloxi MS. (where a similar ship BTW, the USS IWO Jima, was also headed).
    But as of 8/31 the Iwo Jima was still 5 days away. Source
    I read those words: "I can't force myself on people" to mean that the Captain wanted to continue working on behalf of the New Orleans survivors. The captain's own idependent observation and the observation of her crew supported that desire to continue with the work that they had already begun.

    FEMA told that captain they they were not needed in New Orleans -- FEMA ordered the Captain of that ship to reload its crew and equipment, and that they should move to Biloxi MS.

    I welcome another interpretation of those words.
    Based on the things they've achieved since Tuesday (outlined in some detail on their website) both in MS and LA, and given that the Iwo Jima (and the 3 other ships in her group, BTW) wasn't scheduled to arrive until 9/5 (yesterday!) perhaps the repositioning of the ship was prudent?

    I really need to get to bed... but before I check out,, I just wanted to say how much I been enjoying following and participating in the discussion here. Not because the topic is enjoyable, but because it's given me an outlet to try and deal with something nearly incomprehensible in scope. Everyone here has been very civil despite their disagreements, and the TC community should be commended for that - we could all use more civil discussion of issues.
  7. #867  
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  8. #868  
    ...Pilots Who Rescued Victims Are Reprimanded

    DAVID CLOUD NY Times

    PENSACOLA, Fla., Sept. 6 - Two Navy helicopter pilots and their crews returned from New Orleans on Aug. 30 expecting to be greeted as lifesavers after ferrying more than 100 hurricane victims to safety.

    Instead, their superiors chided the pilots, Lt. David Shand and Lt. Matt Udkow, at a meeting the next morning for rescuing civilians when their assignment that day had been to deliver food and water to military installations along the Gulf Coast.

    "I felt it was a great day because we resupplied the people we needed to and we rescued people, too," Lieutenant Udkow said. But the air operations commander at Pensacola Naval Air Station "reminded us that the logistical mission needed to be our area of focus."...

    Only in recent days, after the federal response to the disaster has come to be seen as inadequate, have large numbers of troops and dozens of helicopters, trucks and other equipment been poured into to the effort. Early on, the military rescue operations were smaller, often depending on the initiative of individuals like Lieutenants Shand and Udkow....

    But as the two helicopters were heading back home, the crews picked up a radio transmission from the Coast Guard saying helicopters were needed near the University of New Orleans to help with rescue efforts, the two pilots said.

    Out of range for direct radio communication with Pensacola, more than 100 miles to the east, the pilots said, they decided to respond and turned their helicopters around, diverting from their mission without getting permission from their home base. Within minutes, they were over New Orleans.

    "We're not technically a search-and-rescue unit, but we're trained to do search and rescue," said Lieutenant Shand, a 17-year Navy veteran.

    Flying over Biloxi and Gulfport and other areas of Mississippi, they could see rescue personnel on the ground, Lieutenant Udkow said, but he noticed that there were few rescue units around the flooded city of New Orleans, on the ground or in the air. "It was shocking," he said.

    Seeing people on the roofs of houses waving to him, Lieutenant Udkow headed in their direction. Hovering over power lines, his crew dropped a basket to pick up two residents at a time. He took them to Lakefront Airport, where local emergency medical teams had established a makeshift medical center.

    Meanwhile, Lieutenant Shand landed his helicopter on the roof of an apartment building, where more than a dozen people were marooned. Women and children were loaded first aboard the helicopter and ferried to the airport, he said.

    Returning to pick up the rest, the crew learned that two blind residents had not been able to climb up through the attic to the roof and were still in the building. Two crew members entered the darkened building to find the men, and led them to the roof and into the helicopter, Lieutenant Shand said.

    Recalling the rescues in an interview, he became so emotional that he had to stop and compose himself. At one point, he said, he executed a tricky landing at a highway overpass, where more than 35 people were marooned.

    Lieutenant Udkow said that he saw few other rescue helicopters in New Orleans that day. The toughest part, he said, was seeing so many people imploring him to pick them up and having to leave some.
    ...


    The order to halt civilian relief efforts angered some helicopter crews. Lieutenant Udkow, who associates say was especially vocal about voicing his disagreement to superiors, was taken out of the squadron's flying rotation temporarily and assigned to oversee a temporary kennel established at Pensacola to hold pets of service members evacuated from the hurricane-damaged areas, two members of the unit said. ...

    ...privately some members of the Pensacola unit say the base's two available transport helicopters should have been allowed to do more to help civilian victims in the days after the storm hit, when large numbers of military helicopters had not reached the affected areas.

    In protest, some members of the unit have stopped wearing a search and rescue patch on their sleeves that reads, "So Others May Live."
    Last edited by BARYE; 09/07/2005 at 01:21 AM.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  9. #869  
    This video is from the first few days after the hurricane. The sad part is, in the midst of having gone thru such a terrible ordeal, shes still worried about being arrested...smh...

    http://www.wafb.com/Global/SearchRes...ille&x=13&y=10
    The value of knowledge is not in its possession, but in its use.
  10. #870  
    I'm going to be good and stop posting links but I just cant believe all the crap I am reading. The blog dailykos.com has a lot of other stuff, and they are planning on keeping a record of all the horror stories and fema stuff, and try to substantiate the info.

    http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2005/9/6/211436/8987

    What REALLY happened in New Orleans: Denise Moore's story [UPDATED]
    by ch2
    Tue Sep 6th, 2005 at 18:14:36 PDT

    I have never posted a diary before, almost never comment, but instead lurk and read...

    But I was compelled to share this email forwarded to me: a gripping account of what REALLY happened.

    "They all believed they were sent to the Convention Center to die !"

    ch2's diary :: ::
    Sent: Saturday, September 03, 2005 10:13 AM
    Subject: a survivor's story: Katrina in New Orleans

    I heard from my aunt last night that my cousin Denise made it out of New Orleans; she's at her brother's in Baton Rouge. from what she told me:

    Her mother, a licensed practical nurse, was called in to work on Sunday night at Memorial Hospital (historically known as Baptist Hospital to those of us from N.O.). Denise decided to stay with her mother, her niece and grandniece (who is 2 years old); she figured they'd be safe at the hospital. they went to Baptist, and had to wait hours to be assigned a room to sleep in; after they were finally assigned a room, two white nurses suddenly arrived after the cut-off time (time to be assigned a room), and Denise and her family were booted out; their room was given up to the new nurses. Denise was furious, and rather than stay at Baptist, decided to walk home (several blocks away) to ride out the storm at her mother's apartment. her mother stayed at the hospital.

    she described it as the scariest time in her life. 3 of the rooms in the apartment (there are only 4) caved in. ceilings caved in, walls caved in. she huddled under a mattress in the hall. she thought she would die from either the storm or a heart attack. after the storm passed, she went back to Baptist to seek shelter (this was Monday). it was also scary at Baptist; the electricity was out, they were running on generators, there was no air conditioning. Tuesday the levees broke, and water began rising. they moved patients upstairs, saw boats pass by on what used to be streets. they were told that they would be evacuated, that buses were coming. then they were told they would have to walk to the nearest intersection, Napoleon and S. Claiborne, to await the buses. they waded out in hip-deep water, only to stand at the intersection, on the neutral ground (what y'all call the median) for 3 1/2 hours. the buses came and took them to the Ernest Memorial Convention Center. (yes, the convention center you've all seen on TV.)

    Denise said she thought she was in hell. they were
    there for 2 days, with no water, no food. no shelter. Denise, her mother (63 years old), her niece (21 years old), and 2-year-old grandniece. when they arrived, there were already thousands of people there. they were told that buses were coming. police drove by, windows rolled up, thumbs up signs. national guard trucks rolled by, completely empty, soldiers with guns cocked and aimed at them. nobody stopped to drop off water. a helicopter dropped a load of water, but all the bottles exploded on impact due to the height of
    the helicopter.

    the first day (Wednesday) 4 people died next to her. the second day (Thursday) 6 people died next to her. Denise told me the people around her all thought they had been sent there to die. again, nobody stopped. the only buses that came were full; they dropped off more and more people, but nobody was being picked up and taken away. they found out that those being dropped off had been rescued from rooftops and attics; they got off the buses delirious from lack of water and food. completely dehydrated. the crowd tried to keep them all in one area; Denise said the new arrivals had mostly lost their minds. they had gone crazy.

    inside the convention center, the place was one huge bathroom. in order to ****, you had to stand in other people's ****. the floors were black and slick with ****. most people stayed outside because the smell was so bad. but outside wasn't much better: between the heat, the humidity, the lack of water, the old and very young dying from dehydration... and there was no place to lay down, not even room on the sidewalk. they slept outside Wednesday night, under an overpass.

    Denise said yes, there were young men with guns there. but they organized the crowd. they went to Canal Street and "looted," and brought back food and water for the old people and the babies, because nobody had eaten in days. when the police rolled down windows and yelled out "the buses are coming," the young men with guns organized the crowd in order: old people in front, women and children next, men in the back. just so that when the buses came, there would be priorities of who got out first.

    Denise said the fights she saw between the young men with guns were fist fights. she saw them put their guns down and fight rather than shoot up the crowd. but she said that there were a handful of people shot in the convention center; their bodies were left inside, along with other dead babies and old people.

    Denise said the people thought there were being sent there to die. lots of people being dropped off, nobody being picked up. cops passing by, speeding off. national guard rolling by with guns aimed at them. and yes, a few men shot at the police, because at a certain point all the people thought the cops were coming to hurt them, to kill them all. she saw a young man who had stolen a car speed past, cops in pursuit; he crashed the car, got out and ran, and the cops shot him in the back. in front of the whole crowd. she saw many groups of people decide that they were going to walk across the bridge to the west bank, and those same groups would return, saying that they were met at the top of the bridge by armed police ordering them to turn around, that they weren't allowed to leave.

    so they all believed they were sent there to die. Denise's niece found a pay phone, and kept trying to call her mother's boyfriend in Baton Rouge, and finally got through and told him where they were. the boyfriend, and Denise's brother, drove down from Baton Rouge and came and got them. they had to bribe a few cops, and talk a few into letting them into the city ("come on, man, my 2-year-old niece is at the Convention Center!"), then they took back roads to get to them.

    after arriving at my other cousin's apartment in Baton Rouge, they saw the images on TV, and couldn't believe how the media was portraying the people of New Orleans. she kept repeating to me on the phone last night: make sure you tell everybody that they left us there to die. nobody came. those young men with guns were protecting us. if it wasn't for them, we wouldn't have had the little water and food they had found.

    that's Denise Moore's story.

    Lisa C. Moore
    Update [2005-9-6 22:51:57 by ch2]:: The accounts rang true to me, and I'm a professional skeptic (a scientist), but I respect anyone who wants to approach these stories carefully. I'm initiating an email trackdown of Lisa Moore. If I get a confirmation, I will urge the original author (Lisa Moore), or better yet the survivor herself (Denise Moore), to post at Daily Kos. peace, ch2.
    Update [2005-9-6 23:25 by ch2]: Claude B in the comments found the same story in "Libération", a French newspaper. They have additional information about the Moore family. Here's my translation:

    The Moore family is large and long established creole Catholic family in New Orleans, the Moores are musicians - Deacon John (Moore) is the most famous one of them - professors, nurses... Their houses are now submerged by flooding, and most of them have lost everything following Katrina's passage. Lisa Moore, editor (Redbone press), has collected the testimony of her 43 year-old cousin, Denise Moore, once an education counselor, now a refugee in Baton Rouge. Here is her tale of a dive into Hell.

    Update [2005-9-6 23:39 by ch2]: Lisa Moore is indeed the editor of Redbone press. The url below is their webpage and they have a message board. Anyone interested in getting in touch with Lisa to suggest she share her story with the media ?
    http://www.femmenoir.net/RedbonePress.htm
    The value of knowledge is not in its possession, but in its use.
  11. #871  
    One more...just one more...last one I promise. (i think) This story rings true to me because the mgno.com blog (which most folx accept as accurate)stated that there were people who were cleaning up, washing windows to show they werent a threat, and because of the fox news coverage where the reporter was complaining that they wouldnt let the residents walk out.

    http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2005/9/6/132725/8931


    Hurricane Katrina-Our Experiences

    Larry Bradshaw, Lorrie Beth Slonsky

    Two days after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, the Walgreen's store at the corner of Royal and Iberville streets remained locked. The dairy display case was clearly visible through the widows. It was now 48 hours without electricity, running water, plumbing. The milk, yogurt, and cheeses were beginning to spoil in the 90-degree heat. The owners and managers had locked up the food, water, pampers, and prescriptions and fled the City. Outside Walgreen's windows, residents and tourists grew increasingly thirsty and hungry.

    The much-promised federal, state and local aid never materialized and the windows at Walgreen's gave way to the looters. There was an alternative. The cops could have broken one small window and distributed the nuts, fruit juices, and bottle water in an organized and systematic manner. But they did not. Instead they spent hours playing cat and mouse, temporarily chasing away the looters.

    We were finally airlifted out of New Orleans two days ago and arrived home yesterday (Saturday). We have yet to see any of the TV coverage or look at a newspaper. We are willing to guess that there were no video images or front-page pictures of European or affluent white tourists looting the Walgreen's in the French Quarter.

    We also suspect the media will have been inundated with "hero" images of the National Guard, the troops and the police struggling to help the "victims" of the Hurricane. What you will not see, but what we witnessed,were the real heroes and sheroes of the hurricane relief effort: the working class of New Orleans. The maintenance workers who used a fork lift to carry the sick and disabled. The engineers, who rigged, nurtured and kept the generators running. The electricians who improvised thick extension cords stretching over blocks to share the little electricity we had in order to free cars stuck on rooftop parking lots. Nurses who took over for mechanical ventilators and spent many hours on end manually forcing air into the lungs of unconscious patients to keep them alive. Doormen who rescued folks stuck in elevators. Refinery workers who broke into boat yards, "stealing" boats to rescue their neighbors clinging to their roofs in flood waters. Mechanics who helped hot-wire any car that could be found to ferry people out of the City. And the food service workers who scoured the commercial kitchens improvising communal meals for hundreds of those stranded.

    Most of these workers had lost their homes, and had not heard from members of their families, yet they stayed and provided the only infrastructure for the 20% of New Orleans that was not under water.

    On Day 2, there were approximately 500 of us left in the hotels in the French Quarter. We were a mix of foreign tourists, conference attendees like ourselves, and locals who had checked into hotels for safety and shelter from Katrina. Some of us had cell phone contact with family and friends outside of New Orleans. We were repeatedly told that all sorts of resources including the National Guard and scores of buses were pouring in to the City. The buses and the other resources must have been invisible because none of us had seen them.

    We decided we had to save ourselves. So we pooled our money and came up with $25,000 to have ten buses come and take us out of the City. Those who did not have the requisite $45.00 for a ticket were subsidized by those who did have extra money. We waited for 48 hours for the buses, spending the last 12 hours standing outside, sharing the limited water, food, and clothes we had. We created a priority boarding area for the sick, elderly and new born babies. We waited late into the night for the "imminent" arrival of the buses. The buses never arrived. We later learned that the minute the arrived to the City limits, they were commandeered by the military.

    By day 4 our hotels had run out of fuel and water. Sanitation was dangerously abysmal. As the desperation and despair increased, street crime as well as water levels began to rise. The hotels turned us out and locked their doors, telling us that the "officials" told us to report to the convention center to wait for more buses. As we entered the center of the City, we finally encountered the National Guard. The Guards told us we would not be allowed into the Superdome as the City's primary shelter had descended into a humanitarian and health hellhole. The guards further told us that the City's only other shelter, the Convention Center, was also descending into chaos and squalor and that the police were not allowing anyone else in. Quite naturally, we asked, "If we can't go to the only 2 shelters in the City, what was our alternative?" The guards told us that that was our problem, and no they did not have extra water to give to us. This would be the start of our numerous encounters with callous and hostile "law enforcement".

    We walked to the police command center at Harrah's on Canal Street and were told the same thing, that we were on our own, and no they did not have water to give us. We now numbered several hundred. We held a mass meeting to decide a course of action. We agreed to camp outside the police command post. We would be plainly visible to the media and would constitute a highly visible embarrassment to the City officials. The police told us that we could not stay. Regardless, we began to settle in and set up camp. In short order, the police commander came across the street to address our group. He told us he had a solution: we should walk to the Pontchartrain Expressway and cross the greater New Orleans Bridge where the police had buses lined up to take us out of the City. The crowed cheered and began to move. We called everyone back and explained to the commander that there had been lots of misinformation and wrong information and was he sure that there were buses waiting for us. The commander turned to the crowd and stated emphatically, "I swear to you that the buses are there."

    We organized ourselves and the 200 of us set off for the bridge with great excitement and hope. As we marched pasted the convention center, many locals saw our determined and optimistic group and asked where we were headed. We told them about the great news. Families immediately grabbed their few belongings and quickly our numbers doubled and then doubled again. Babies in strollers now joined us, people using crutches, elderly clasping walkers and others people in wheelchairs. We marched the 2-3 miles to the freeway and up the steep incline to the Bridge. It now began to pour down rain, but it did not dampen our enthusiasm.

    As we approached the bridge, armed Gretna sheriffs formed a line across the foot of the bridge. Before we were close enough to speak, they began
    firing their weapons over our heads. This sent the crowd fleeing in various directions. As the crowd scattered and dissipated, a few of us inched forward and managed to engage some of the sheriffs in conversation. We told them of our conversation with the police commander and of the commander's assurances. The sheriffs informed us there were no buses waiting. The commander had lied to us to get us to move.

    We questioned why we couldn't cross the bridge anyway, especially as there was little traffic on the 6-lane highway. They responded that the West Bank was not going to become New Orleans and there would be no Superdomes in their City. These were code words for if you are poor and black, you are not crossing the Mississippi River and you were not getting out of New Orleans.

    Our small group retreated back down Highway 90 to seek shelter from the rain under an overpass. We debated our options and in the end decided to build an encampment in the middle of the Ponchartrain Expressway on the center divide, between the O'Keefe and Tchoupitoulas exits. We reasoned we would be visible to everyone, we would have some security being on an elevated freeway and we could wait and watch for the arrival of the yet to be seen buses.

    All day long, we saw other families, individuals and groups make the same trip up the incline in an attempt to cross the bridge, only to be turned away. Some chased away with gunfire, others simply told no, others to be verbally berated and humiliated. Thousands of New Orleaners were prevented and prohibited from self-evacuating the City on foot. Meanwhile, the only two City shelters sank further into squalor and disrepair. The only way across the bridge was by vehicle. We saw workers stealing trucks, buses, moving vans, semi-trucks and any car that could be hotwired. All were packed with people trying to escape the misery New Orleans had become.

    Our little encampment began to blossom. Someone stole a water delivery truck and brought it up to us. Let's hear it for looting! A mile or so down the freeway, an army truck lost a couple of pallets of C-rations on a tight turn. We ferried the food back to our camp in shopping carts. Now secure with the two necessities, food and water; cooperation, community, and creativity flowered. We organized a clean up and hung garbage bags from the rebar poles. We made beds from wood pallets and cardboard. We designated a storm drain as the bathroom and the kids built an elaborate enclosure for privacy out of plastic, broken umbrellas, and other scraps. We even organized a food recycling system where individuals could swap out parts of C-rations (applesauce for babies and candies for kids!).

    This was a process we saw repeatedly in the aftermath of Katrina. When individuals had to fight to find food or water, it meant looking out for yourself only. You had to do whatever it took to find water for your kids or food for your parents. When these basic needs were met, people began to look out for each other, working together and constructing a community.

    If the relief organizations had saturated the City with food and water in the first 2 or 3 days, the desperation, the frustration and the ugliness would not have set in.

    Flush with the necessities, we offered food and water to passing families and individuals. Many decided to stay and join us. Our encampment grew to 80 or 90 people.

    From a woman with a battery powered radio we learned that the media was talking about us. Up in full view on the freeway, every relief and news organizations saw us on their way into the City. Officials were being asked what they were going to do about all those families living up on the freeway? The officials responded they were going to take care of us. Some of us got a sinking feeling. "Taking care of us" had an ominous tone to it.

    Unfortunately, our sinking feeling (along with the sinking City) was correct. Just as dusk set in, a Gretna Sheriff showed up, jumped out of his patrol vehicle, aimed his gun at our faces, screaming, "Get off the ****ing freeway". A helicopter arrived and used the wind from its blades to blow away our flimsy structures. As we retreated, the sheriff loaded up his truck with our food and water.

    Once again, at gunpoint, we were forced off the freeway. All the law enforcement agencies appeared threatened when we congregated or congealed into groups of 20 or more. In every congregation of "victims" they saw "mob" or "riot". We felt safety in numbers. Our "we must stay together" was impossible because the agencies would force us into small atomized groups.

    In the pandemonium of having our camp raided and destroyed, we scattered once again. Reduced to a small group of 8 people, in the dark, we sought refuge in an abandoned school bus, under the freeway on Cilo Street. We were hiding from possible criminal elements but equally and definitely, we were hiding from the police and sheriffs with their martial law, curfew and shoot-to-kill policies.

    The next days, our group of 8 walked most of the day, made contact with New Orleans Fire Department and were eventually airlifted out by an urban search and rescue team. We were dropped off near the airport and managed to catch a ride with the National Guard. The two young guardsmen apologized for the limited response of the Louisiana guards. They explained that a large section of their unit was in Iraq and that meant they were shorthanded and were unable to complete all the tasks they were assigned.

    We arrived at the airport on the day a massive airlift had begun. The airport had become another Superdome. We 8 were caught in a press of humanity as flights were delayed for several hours while George Bush landed briefly at the airport for a photo op. After being evacuated on a coast guard cargo plane, we arrived in San Antonio, Texas.

    There the humiliation and dehumanization of the official relief effort continued. We were placed on buses and driven to a large field where we were forced to sit for hours and hours. Some of the buses did not have air-conditioners. In the dark, hundreds if us were forced to share two filthy overflowing porta-potties. Those who managed to make it out with any possessions (often a few belongings in tattered plastic bags) we were subjected to two different dog-sniffing searches.

    Most of us had not eaten all day because our C-rations had been confiscated at the airport because the rations set off the metal detectors. Yet, no food had been provided to the men, women, children, elderly, disabled as they sat for hours waiting to be "medically screened" to make sure we were not carrying any communicable diseases.

    This official treatment was in sharp contrast to the warm, heart-felt reception given to us by the ordinary Texans. We saw one airline worker give her shoes to someone who was barefoot. Strangers on the street offered us money and toiletries with words of welcome. Throughout, the official relief effort was callous, inept, and racist. There was more suffering than need be. Lives were lost that did not need to be lost.
    The value of knowledge is not in its possession, but in its use.
  12. #872  
    Quote Originally Posted by Sukiyaki
    This video is from the first few days after the hurricane. The sad part is, in the midst of having gone thru such a terrible ordeal, shes still worried about being arrested...smh...

    http://www.wafb.com/Global/SearchRes...ille&x=13&y=10

    extraordinarily chillingly video !!!
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  13. #873  
    This thread has gotten out of hand, full of politics and only who is to blame. It has been exhausted on who we all think is to blame. If you were wanting to provide a nice story on heroism regarding the the rescuers - start a new thread. This one is a spinfest, complainfest of libs.
  14. #874  
    I went back to a report I read before Katrina hit on what the hurricane may do to New Orleans. It's an almost one-to-one description of what actually happened:
    Van Heerden said levees built to protect New Orleans from Pontchartrain could be buffeted by waves from the lake, which is about 23 miles by 35 miles in area.
    "You're going to have enormous waves develop on that lake, especially with as much as 14 hours of hurricane-force winds," he said.
    Those waves will erode the levees, raising the possibility of their collapse, he said.
    "This is what we've been saying has been going to happen for years," he said. "Unfortunately, it's coming true."
    http://www.cnn.com/2005/WEATHER/08/2...day/index.html
    Unfortunately, neither Bush, nor Chertoff, nor Brown seem to watch TV or visit news homepages, at least they claimed they had never heard of such a thing as a levee breaking. Nor did anybody else in charge seem to care about scientific evidence for the well documented looming disaster during the past decades.

    I wonder why this was so? Maybe because many in the US seem to think scientists are liberal lunatics who stick to weird theories such as evolution, or even global warming?
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” (Philip K. ****)
  15. #875  
    Quote Originally Posted by clulup
    I went back to a report I read before Katrina hit on what the hurricane may do to New Orleans. It's an almost one-to-one description of what actually happened:

    Unfortunately, neither Bush, nor Chertoff, nor Brown seem to watch TV or visit news homepages, at least they claimed they had never heard of such a thing as a levee breaking. Nor did anybody else in charge seem to care about scientific evidence for the well documented looming disaster during the past decades.

    I wonder why this was so? Maybe because many in the US seem to think scientists are liberal lunatics who stick to weird theories such as evolution, or even global warming?
    Time will tell, but Mike Brown may eventually be fired over his actions after the levee broke. But for the fn 100th time - in our country, it is the responsibility of the local and state govt to evacuate.
  16. #876  
    Quote Originally Posted by clulup
    I wonder why this was so? Maybe because many in the US seem to think scientists are liberal lunatics who stick to weird theories such as evolution, or even global warming?
    What does Global Warming have to do with a hurricane or levees breaking?
  17. #877  
    Perfect Words

    Let's take a break from the joy of Bush bashing to reveal the dirty little secret of New Orleans: Its local government deserves an F for its planning and response to Katrina. And one other thing: The New Orleans police force would be a joke if it weren't a disgrace.
  18. #878  
    The blog dailykos.com has a lot of other stuff, and they are planning on keeping a record of all the horror stories and fema stuff, and try to substantiate the info.
    Good lord, listen to yourself! Perhaps they might substantiate *before* posting. Sheesh.
    Current: iPhone 3G
    Retired from active duty: Treo 800w, Sprint Touch, Mogul, Apache, Cingular Treo 650, HP iPaq 4350, T|T, M505 - Nokia 3650 - SE R520m, T610, T637, Moto P280, etc, etc...
  19. #879  
    Quote Originally Posted by Advance The Man
    What does Global Warming have to do with a hurricane or levees breaking?
    The theory is:

    Global warming => higher sea levels and => stronger hurricanes because of warmer water temperatures.

    I hope this will all be proven wrong, like Rush insists it is. However, if Rush is wrong, then it will be too late to turn this around before an absolute proof of global warming (that satisfies the right wing extremists) is available.
    --
    Aloke
    Cingular GSM
    Software:Treo650-1.17-CNG
    Firmware:01.51 Hardware:A
  20. NRG
    NRG is offline
    NRG's Avatar
    Posts
    3,657 Posts
    Global Posts
    3,670 Global Posts
    #880  
    Quote Originally Posted by Advance The Man
    Perfect Words

    Let's take a break from the joy of Bush bashing to reveal the dirty little secret of New Orleans: Its local government deserves an F for its planning and response to Katrina. And one other thing: The New Orleans police force would be a joke if it weren't a disgrace.
    If we look at this in a simple manner ATM and try not to over analyze it we will see the problem right here.

    Source: WDSU

    Nagin: Entire City Will Soon Be Underwater
    Problems Escalate To 'Another Level'

    POSTED: 10:02 pm CDT August 30, 2005

    New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin is "very upset" that an attempt to fix the breach in the levee at the 17th Street canal has failed, and he said the challenges that the city is facing have "escalated to another level."

    "The sandbagging that we had hoped would happen didn't materialize today, so the water continued to rise at that particular location," he said.

    -snip-

    Nagin said the sandbagging was scheduled for midday, but the Blackhawk helicopters needed to help did not show up. He said the sandbags were ready and all the helicopter had to do was "show up." He said after his afternoon helicopter tour of the city, he was assured that officials had a plan and a timeline to drop the sandbags on the levee breach.

    He said he was told that the helicopters may have been diverted to rescue about 1,000 people in a church, but he is still not sure who gave the order.

    -snip-
    The local government people followed their evac plan, and they executed it. Then things got out of control. What I would like to know is who gave the order to go pick people up at a church instead of sandbagging.

Posting Permissions