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  1. #761  
    Quote Originally Posted by Advance The Man
    Man, you really go from quality posts to trolling.

    Where is your post that Bush hates black people and he purposely refrained from giving them help?
    I believe Kanye West already beat him to the punch.

    Did anyone watch the Hurricane Katrina Relief Concert Friday night?

    Kanye West (after a nonsensical rant) - "George Bush doesn't like black people!"

    Mike Myers (standing next to him during the segment, after taking a second to digest what was just said) - "..."

    Camera quickly cuts away.

    Classic TV moment, and sure to get Kanye invited to the next fundraiser.
    I'm back!
  2. #762  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    Besides, no matter what he does, his apologists (ATM?) will be here defending him
    ...And his detractors will attack, no matter what he does - which is my point.
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    There is more than enough blame in this SNAFU to go around. However much Bush's supporters are prepared to dismiss on his behalf, it is really pretty hard to ignore the Washington Post article.
    The article mentioned does indeed indicate a failure in DHS and FEMA. It also includes the following paragraph which was not included in BARYE's long excerpt:

    Other federal and state officials pointed to Louisiana's failure to measure up to national disaster response standards, noting that the federal plan advises state and local emergency managers not to expect federal aid for 72 to 96 hours, and base their own preparedness efforts on the need to be self-sufficient for at least that period. "Fundamentally the first breakdown occurred at the local level," said one state official who works with FEMA. "Did the city have the situational awareness of what was going on within its borders? The answer was no."

    This all certainly sounds like it's decending into finger-pointing, and as you state, there seems to be plenty of blame to go around.
    Last edited by phurth; 09/04/2005 at 04:42 PM.
  3. #763  
    I think I really need a break. From the internet and tv. This stuff is so disheartening.

    http://www.jabberwonk.com/index.cfm? this is a link to a whole list of the news stories that I have been finding all over the place in one convienent location

    A co-worker told me today that one of the major republican magazines are calling for the president's impeachment so I guess his supporters are already bailing on him. I dont remember the name of the magazine. If its not posted on here by the next time I go to work I will post it. What do you guys think of the conspiracy theory that this is just meant to start chaos so they can declare martial law?
    The value of knowledge is not in its possession, but in its use.
  4. #764  
    In case anybody got the impression Michael Brown, director of FEMA was not up to the challenge, this may be because Bush made the former "Judges and Stewards Commissioner" for the International Arabian Horses Association director of FEMA - "a position from which he was forced to resign in the face of mounting litigation and financial disarray." (Quote)

    More Background from another source:
    "Brown ran for Congress in 1988 and won 27 percent of the vote against Democratic incumbent Glenn English. He spent the 1990s as judges and stewards commissioner of the International Arabian Horse Association. His job was to ensure that horse-show judges followed the rules and to investigate allegations against those suspected of cheating.

    "I wouldn't have regarded his position in the horse industry as a platform to where he is now," said Tom Connelly, a former association president.

    Brown's ticket to FEMA was Joe Allbaugh, President Bush's 2000 campaign manager and an old friend of Brown's in Oklahoma. When Bush ran for president in 2000, Brown was ending a rocky tenure at the horse association.

    Brown told several association officials that if Bush were elected, he'd be in line for a good job. When Allbaugh, who managed Bush's campaign, took over FEMA in 2001, he took Brown with him as general counsel.

    ...

    Brown practiced law in Enid, Okla., a city of about 45,000, during the 1980s and was counsel to a group of businesses run by a well-known Enid family. Before that, he worked for the city of Edmond, Okla., and was an aide in the state legislature.

    From 1991 until 2000, Brown earned about $100,000 a year as the chief rules enforcer of the Arabian horse association.

    ...

    At FEMA, Brown rose from general counsel to deputy director within a year. Bush named him to succeed Allbaugh in February 2003. With FEMA now part of the Department of Homeland Security, Brown's title is undersecretary for emergency preparedness and response.

    Brown's old friend Lester said the progression from horse shows to hurricanes was natural.

    "A lot of what he had to do was stand in the breach in difficult, controversial situations," Lester said. "Which I think would well prepare him for his work at FEMA."


    Despite the withering criticism and a promised congressional investigation of FEMA's performance, Brown still has the support of his most important constituent.

    In Mobile, Ala., on Friday, Bush said the response to Katrina was unsatisfactory. But he had nothing but praise for his FEMA director. "Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job," the president said.
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” (Philip K. ****)
  5. #765  
    I know I said I was taking a break but I just keep finding stuff. These are all articles linked off jabberwonk to their source. There are so many more, really, check out the site.



    http://www.jabberwonk.com/flinker.cfm?cliid=84coy

    German News reports that Bush visit to NO was staged - food tents torn down when he left

    September 03, 2005
    If he could go to Baghdad, why didn't Bush go to the New Orleans Superdome or the Convention Center? It was bizarre for all of the country and much of the world to be watching those scenes for days on our TVs and news reports, and for Bush's photo ops to be in areas that were far less critical. I know there are security considerations but his visit seemed extraordinarily hollow even by this administration's standard of ultra-stage managed events.

    Dutch viewer Frank Tiggelaar writes:

    There was a striking dicrepancy between the CNN International report on the Bush visit to the New Orleans disaster zone, yesterday, and reports of the same event by German TV.

    ZDF News reported that the president's visit was a completely staged event. Their crew witnessed how the open air food distribution point Bush visited in front of the cameras was torn down immediately after the president and the herd of 'news people' had left and that others which were allegedly being set up were abandoned at the same time.

    The people in the area were once again left to fend for themselves, said ZDF.



    http://www.jabberwonk.com/flinker.cfm?cliid=pzcub

    September 03, 2005
    Fake sympathy and fake relief efforts
    I didn't join in criticizing Mary Landrieu for not bashing GWB for his failures concerning Katrina. It was legitimate for her to put her efforts into securing help for New Orleans, and unfortunatly it's the President -- a President with a clear record of punishing those who criticize him -- who has help to give.

    But apparently her patience has now been exhausted: and no wonder. She reports that the big levee-fixing operation she watched with GWB yesterday turns out to have been merely a show for the cameras. (See boldface below.)

    Here is the full text of a press release issued by her office:


    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    09/03/2005

    Landrieu Implores President to "Relieve Unmitigated Suffering;" End FEMA's "Abject Failures"

    WASHINGTON -- U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, D-La., issued the following statement this afternoon regarding her call yesterday for President Bush to appoint a cabinet-level official to oversee Hurricane Katrina relief and recovery efforts within 24 hours.

    Sen. Landrieu said:

    "Yesterday, I was hoping President Bush would come away from his tour of the regional devastation triggered by Hurricane Katrina with a new understanding for the magnitude of the suffering and for the abject failures of the current Federal Emergency Management Agency. 24 hours later, the President has yet to answer my call for a cabinet-level official to lead our efforts. Meanwhile, FEMA, now a shell of what it once was, continues to be overwhelmed by the task at hand.

    "I understand that the U.S. Forest Service had water-tanker aircraft available to help douse the fires raging on our riverfront, but FEMA has yet to accept the aid. When Amtrak offered trains to evacuate significant numbers of victims -- far more efficiently than buses -- FEMA again dragged its feet. Offers of medicine, communications equipment and other desperately needed items continue to flow in, only to be ignored by the agency.

    "But perhaps the greatest disappointment stands at the breached 17th Street levee. Touring this critical site yesterday with the President, I saw what I believed to be a real and significant effort to get a handle on a major cause of this catastrophe. Flying over this critical spot again this morning, less than 24 hours later, it became apparent that yesterday we witnessed a hastily prepared stage set for a Presidential photo opportunity; and the desperately needed resources we saw were this morning reduced to a single, lonely piece of equipment. The good and decent people of southeast Louisiana and the Gulf Coast -- black and white, rich and poor, young and old -- deserve far better from their national government.

    "Mr. President, I'm imploring you once again to get a cabinet-level official stood up as soon as possible to get this entire operation moving forward regionwide with all the resources -- military and otherwise -- necessary to relieve the unmitigated suffering and economic damage that is unfolding."

    Today's aerial tour of the 17th Street levee will be featured tomorrow on ABC's This Week with George Stephanopoulos. Later, Sen. Landrieu will also appear on CBS's 60 Minutes.



    http://www.jabberwonk.com/flinker.cfm?cliid=1kl1i

    Newsview: Rhetoric Not Matching Reality
    By RON FOURNIER
    AP Political Writer


    WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Iraqi insurgency is in its last throes. The economy is booming. Anybody who leaks a CIA agent's identity will be fired. Add another piece of White House rhetoric that doesn't match the public's view of reality: Help is on the way, Gulf Coast.

    As New Orleans descended into anarchy, top Bush administration officials congratulated each other for jobs well done and spoke of water, food and troops pouring into the ravaged city. Television pictures told a different story.

    "What it reminded me of the other day is 'Baghdad Bob' saying there are no Americans at the airport," said Rich Galen, a Republican consultant in Washington. He was referring to Saddam Hussein's reality-challenged minister of information who denied the existence of U.S. troops in the Iraqi capital.

    To some critics, President Bush seemed to deny the existence of problems with hurricane relief this week. He waited until Friday to acknowledged that "the results are not acceptable," and even then the president parsed his words.

    Republicans worry that he looks out of touch defending the chaotic emergency response.

    "It's impossible to defend something like this happening in America," said former House Speaker Newt Gingrich.

    "No one can be happy with the kind of response which we've seen in New Orleans," said Republican Gov. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts.

    Bush got himself in trouble by trying to put the best face on a horrible situation. The strategy is so common in Washington that operatives have a name for it, "spin," and the Bush White House has perfected the shady art.
    This is what the president had to say about the relief effort earlier in the week:

    -"There's a lot of food on its way, a lot of water on the way, and there's a lot of boats and choppers headed that way."

    -"Thousands have been rescued. There's thousands more to be rescued. And there's a lot of people focusing their efforts on that."

    -"As we speak, people are moving into New Orleans area to maintain law and order."

    Technically, the president may have been right. Help was on the way, if not fast enough to handle one of the largest emergency response efforts in U.S. history. But the words were jarring to Americans who saw images of looters, abandoned corpses and angry, desperate storm victims.

    It was worse when he was wrong. In one interview, Bush said, "I don't think anybody anticipated the breach of the levees." In fact, many experts predicted a major storm would bust New Orleans' flood-control barriers.

    One reason the public relations effort backfired on Bush is that Americans have seen it before.

    On Iraq alone, the rhetoric has repeatedly fallen far short of reality. Saddam had no weapons of mass destruction. The mission wasn't accomplished in May 2003. Most allies avoided the hard work of his "coalition of the willing." And dozens of U.S. soldiers have died since Vice President **** Cheney declared that insurgents were in their "last throes."

    Bush often touts the health of the U.S. economy, which is fair game because many indicators point in that direction. But the public doesn't share his rosy view. The global economy had most Americans worried about job and pension security even before rising gas added to their anxieties.

    Bush's spokesman said anybody involved in leaking the identity of a CIA agent would be fired, but no action has been taken against officials accused of doing so.

    The president himself promised to fully pay for his school reform plan and strip pork-barrel spending from a major highway bill. The school money fell short. The pork thrived.

    The list goes on. But this didn't start with Bush. Former President Clinton certainly had his rhetoric vs. reality problems. Indeed, most politicians do. At some point, however, the spin can take a toll.

    Bush crafted a reputation as a blunt-speaking, can-do leader from his response to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Five months later, about three-fourths of Americans viewed him as honest.

    But his trust rating dropped gradually to a slim majority by the 2004 election year and remained at the mid-50s through the early part of 2005. In August, an AP-Ipsos poll showed 48 percent of respondents considered Bush honest, the lowest level of his presidency.

    Americans like straight-shooters, especially in an era that has seen vast failures by government and social institutions. People are witnessing another institutional failure in the Gulf Coast, and Bush reluctantly acknowledged it Friday.

    "This is a storm that's going to require immediate action now," he said. Few would disagree.

    ---
    The value of knowledge is not in its possession, but in its use.
  6. #766  
    Quote Originally Posted by phurth
    .......Other federal and state officials pointed to Louisiana's failure to measure up to national disaster response standards, noting that the federal plan advises state and local emergency managers not to expect federal aid for 72 to 96 hours, and base their own preparedness efforts on the need to be self-sufficient for at least that period. "Fundamentally the first breakdown occurred at the local level," said one state official who works with FEMA. "Did the city have the situational awareness of what was going on within its borders? The answer was no.".....
    I remember Governor Blanco wringing her hands on Tuesday night. All that said and agreed to, nothing absolves FEMA or DHS for Thursday. The only one telling truth to power on Thursday, the only public official not blaming "looters," was Mayor Nagin.
  7. #767  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    I remember Governor Blanco wringing her hands on Tuesday night. All that said and agreed to, nothing absolves FEMA or DHS for Thursday. The only one telling truth to power on Thursday, the only public official not blaming "looters," was Mayor Nagin.
    Now we can add Mary Ladrieu. I have not heard her blame "looters" either. Let's not forget Aaron Broussard of Jefferson Parish. No list of heroes can omit the USCG, there early, long, and late. Any other nominations for hero?

    Incidentally, anyone see or hear from General Honore, the hero of the convention center, since GWB left Louis Armstrong Airport?
    Last edited by whmurray; 09/04/2005 at 05:01 PM.
  8. #768  
    Wonderin' where those helicopters are
    Well behaved women rarely make history
  9. #769  
    Quote Originally Posted by clairegrrl
    Wonderin' where those helicopters are
    We know where the Coast Guard helicopters are. No one died on their watch. No one died because they arrived late or left early. Dear God, would that we had had a few more.
  10. #770  
    Quote Originally Posted by Sukiyaki
    I don't know if they intentionally withheld relief or not. They certainly didnt encourage it: http://www.dailykos.com/story/2005/9/3/171718/0826
    [SNIP]
    It was because of this that my friend and I have been trying launch boats both yesterday and today but to no avail. It looks like FINALLY the Governor has just said SCREW FEMA, get those boats in the water and help save my citizens.

    So I think we'll be in the water tomorrow to help but for now I'm immensely frustrated.

    If there is anyone on the CCN that is in the Baton Rouge area we are meeting today at the LA State Dem Party HQ at 2pm CST to game out tomorrow.
    To add a little more context to this (and from a slightly more, uh, reliable source):
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...0301680_3.html

    Outside New Orleans, frustration boiled over among the boatmen who spontaneously left their homes in central Louisiana to rescue stranded residents in the first hours after reports of flooding hit the airwaves. For the past two days, many have been turned away because of security concerns in a city that had turned violent and chaotic.

    "It's a tragedy that's unfolding now," said Moose Billeaud, a former New Orleans prosecutor who is now in private practice in Lafayette, La. "It is not organized at all."

    The boatmen who made it in came back with harrowing memories. Kenny, who did not want to disclose his last name, said friends were shot at by stranded people who wanted to steal their boats. "It's total chaos," he said.
    Even today, the federal government does not appear to have unified command and control over the relief and recovery effort. From the same Washington Post story:
    Behind the scenes, a power struggle emerged, as federal officials tried to wrest authority from Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco (D). Shortly before midnight Friday, the Bush administration sent her a proposed legal memorandum asking her to request a federal takeover of the evacuation of New Orleans, a source within the state's emergency operations center said Saturday.

    The administration sought unified control over all local police and state National Guard units reporting to the governor. Louisiana officials rejected the request after talks throughout the night, concerned that such a move would be comparable to a federal declaration of martial law. Some officials in the state suspected a political motive behind the request. "Quite frankly, if they'd been able to pull off taking it away from the locals, they then could have blamed everything on the locals," said the source, who does not have the authority to speak publicly.

    A senior administration official said that Bush has clear legal authority to federalize National Guard units to quell civil disturbances under the Insurrection Act and will continue to try to unify the chains of command that are split among the president, the Louisiana governor and the New Orleans mayor.
    A good argument can be made that the feds should have attempted this much earlier, however it would have clearly been over the objections of the governor. Given that even as things now stand I just read a post forwarding a conspiracy theory about the imposition of martial law... well I can just imagine the squeals if Bush would try imposing federal authority.

    Perhaps a lesson here is to wait until more actual facts are available before making judgements on what portion of blame to assign to whom and for what. My original position on this was that the largest burden should fall on the local and state officials who seemed not to have properly prepared for what was expected. Since then I've seen plenty about how the feds also deserve a portion (but nothing yet that absolves the locals, including Mayor Nagin). I'm going to keep reading and hopefully a clearer picture of exactly what the he** happened will emerge.
  11. #771  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    We know where the Coast Guard helicopters are. No one died on their watch. No one died because they arrived late or left early. Dear God, would that we had had a few more.
    The United States Coast Guard is truly awe-inspiring. What they're doing now is an extreme example of what they do every day.
  12. #772  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    Any other nominations for hero?
    How about the NOPD officers who stayed at their posts despite impossible conditions and despite their own personal tragedies?
  13. #773  
    murray I was questioning Bush actions early after the flood and right here on this thread. I stopped once I realized the bs protocol that left the LA governor the opportunity to order the manpower and supplies, but she didn't. In her defense, she didn't know the levee was gonna break. But if I were her I would of had the troops/supplies in the city the minute after the storm.

    re: General Honore, he was interviewe by cnn then fox this afternoon. he was very supportive of federal and state respnse. He explained in detail why he thought it took so long.
  14. #774  
    The value of knowledge is not in its possession, but in its use.
  15. #775  
    Quote Originally Posted by Advance The Man
    murray I was questioning Bush actions early after the flood and right here on this thread. I stopped once I realized the bs protocol that left the LA governor the opportunity to order the manpower and supplies, but she didn't. In her defense, she didn't know the levee was gonna break. But if I were her I would of had the troops/supplies in the city the minute after the storm.

    re: General Honore, he was interviewe by cnn then fox this afternoon. he was very supportive of federal and state respnse. He explained in detail why he thought it took so long.
    Perhaps. I am not a fan of Governor Blanco in this situation. By Tuesady night she was already wringing her hands, whining about law and order, and asking for boots. It is not clear to me that she could have gotten food and water to the convention center on Thursday. What is clear is that if POTUS could not, then she could not.

    This is the city in which I grew up and in which my brothers, sisters, nieces, and nephews, great nieces and great nephews live. I watched as the Southern Yacht Club, of which I have been a member for fifty years, went up in flames. My 150 year old high school is at the intersection of Carrollton Avenue and Banks Street, the lowest point in the city. My family are safe but they have lost their homes and their livelihoods. I am more sympathetic to the victims than the authorities, but I am looking for the heroes, not villains (read the thread.) That said, Tuesday was awful, Thursday was painful and Friday was not much better. From where I sit POTUS, DHS (Chertoff), and FEMA (Brown) have been posturing, not executing. The Governor has been defensive, inept and ineffective. Perhaps there has been looting. Perhaps there has been lawlessness. However, what I saw was people who were hungry, thirsty, and frightened, in filth to their knees and begging for relief. Yes, I saw a few people stealing TVs and heard of some stealing guns and cars. But what I mostly saw was people taking, not stealing, bottled water and diapers. Diapers for god sake.

    I have been in the Moreale Convention Center many times. I have heard both George H. W. Bush and Colin Powell speak there to audiences of twenty thousand or more. It is a huge facility that can accomodate a hundred thousand people. I have eaten there with 10,000 other people. That people should die there for lack of food and water is appalling.

    As much as I hate to say it, it seems clear to me that those people were held hostage to agendas. Both the Governor and the President were trying to hold the "law and order" high ground. They refused access to the Red Cross and to other volunteers so as to be able to say that they had "zero tolerance for looters." Trust me when I tell you that not only do I sympathesize with those who stole diapers but would have been handing them out. If I am right, then both the Governor and POTUS have disgraced us all. Whoever did it, whoever is to blame, we stand disgraced before the world. It will be hard to redeem ourselves. Where is the country that came together after 9/11?
    Last edited by whmurray; 09/04/2005 at 09:12 PM.
  16. #776  
    Quote Originally Posted by Sukiyaki
    ATM, lest you think that I am unjustifiably harsh, please read this page. Read it in the recognition that the American people are very forgiving of their leaders and particularly loyal to Mr. Bush, the hero of 9/11.
    Last edited by whmurray; 09/04/2005 at 09:34 PM.
  17. #777  
    In order to fairly judge the actions of officials at various levels I'm curious to hear opinions on the following questions:

    1) When did the current crisis start? This might seem obvious at first glance. To me it is not. Did it start when Katrina made landfall Monday morning? Before landfall? When the levees were first breached? When it became clear the levee damage was irreparable?

    2) If the federal response time was unacceptable, what should it have been - realistically? As the President has said, the disaster covers an area the size of Great Britain. New Orleans was not the only area affected. The article referenced at: http://noquarter.typepad.com/my_webl...al_neglig.html (FWIW, hardly an unbiased source) quotes the National Response Plan (NRP). The way I read the quote (which I'll assume to be accurate and in context), once the POTUS declares an "Incident of National Significance", authority to assume command and control devolves to the federal government. This declaration was made on 8/31 (but I haven't found at what time this was done - anyone know?). My question, could I ask the right people, would be, "Why not until Wednesday?" The NRP seems to be biased strongly toward dealing with a terrorist incident. It appears that only lip-service is paid to the possibility of a natural disaster. When should this declaration should have been made?

    3) What responsibility, if any, did the local and state governments have to provide adequate facilities over the 72-96 hours they knew (based on their own statements at the time) they might be on their own?
  18. #778  
    Quote Originally Posted by phurth
    In order to fairly judge the actions of officials at various levels I'm curious to hear opinions on the following questions:

    1) When did the current crisis start? This might seem obvious at first glance. To me it is not. Did it start when Katrina made landfall Monday morning? Before landfall? When the levees were first breached? When it became clear the levee damage was irreparable?
    There were three key times. When it became clear that the storm would hit the Gulf Coast. when the levee broke, and Thursday. The political crisis began Thursday.



    Quote Originally Posted by phurth
    2) If the federal response time was unacceptable, what should it have been - realistically? As the President has said, the disaster covers an area the size of Great Britain. New Orleans was not the only area affected. The article referenced at: http://noquarter.typepad.com/my_webl...al_neglig.html (FWIW, hardly an unbiased source) quotes the National Response Plan (NRP). The way I read the quote (which I'll assume to be accurate and in context), once the POTUS declares an "Incident of National Significance", authority to assume command and control devolves to the federal government. This declaration was made on 8/31 (but I haven't found at what time this was done - anyone know?). My question, could I ask the right people, would be, "Why not until Wednesday?" The NRP seems to be biased strongly toward dealing with a terrorist incident. It appears that only lip-service is paid to the possibility of a natural disaster. When should this declaration should have been made?
    I do not know. What I do know is that hours would have been forgivable but days were not.

    Quote Originally Posted by phurth
    3) What responsibility, if any, did the local and state governments have to provide adequate facilities over the 72-96 hours they knew (based on their own statements at the time) they might be on their own?
    It seems to me that local authorities might have commandeered local transit to evacuate more people, though it is not at all clear where they might have taken them. They might well have stocked both the Superdome and the Convention Center with food, water, and sanitation.

    It seems clear that from the time that the levee broke, the local authorities were overwhelmed. That it was their responsibility does not excuse the rest of us from ignoriing their pleas. It is easy enough to say that they should have anticipated the severity of the event. The fact is that no one anticipated the need to evacuate the city. No one anticipated that victims would be in the Superdome or the Convention Center for more that 48 hours.

    [My niece left with only a change of clothes for herself and her children and left her dogs in the house because she would be right back. My brother left his book of business, his agenda (not a Treo user); even if he knew when and where to go to work, he has no business clothes.]

    As I have already written here, I was reassured when I heard that the break was in a canal flood wall rather than in a lakefront levee; a break in the canal
    might have been repaired before there was so much loss of life and property. Like Senator Landrieu, I am not sanguine about Project Hope.
  19. #779  
    Google Map of the devastation.
    James Hromadka, TreoCentral Editor
    Houston - EST. 1836
  20. #780  
    Quote Originally Posted by phurth
    In order to fairly judge the actions of officials at various levels I'm curious to hear opinions on the following questions:

    1) When did the current crisis start? This might seem obvious at first glance. To me it is not. Did it start when Katrina made landfall Monday morning? Before landfall? When the levees were first breached? When it became clear the levee damage was irreparable?

    2) If the federal response time was unacceptable, what should it have been - realistically? As the President has said, the disaster covers an area the size of Great Britain. New Orleans was not the only area affected. The article referenced at: http://noquarter.typepad.com/my_webl...al_neglig.html (FWIW, hardly an unbiased source) quotes the National Response Plan (NRP). The way I read the quote (which I'll assume to be accurate and in context), once the POTUS declares an "Incident of National Significance", authority to assume command and control devolves to the federal government. This declaration was made on 8/31 (but I haven't found at what time this was done - anyone know?). My question, could I ask the right people, would be, "Why not until Wednesday?" The NRP seems to be biased strongly toward dealing with a terrorist incident. It appears that only lip-service is paid to the possibility of a natural disaster. When should this declaration should have been made?

    3) What responsibility, if any, did the local and state governments have to provide adequate facilities over the 72-96 hours they knew (based on their own statements at the time) they might be on their own? ...

    I can't give much time to this now but here's my quick (tired) read.


    If I'm the head of FEMA this is what I and or my staff would have been doing:

    Thurs- Friday when forecasters started describing with forboding Katrina's path -- and the probability that it would strengthen fiercely and that it was liable to head for New Orleans.

    FEMA's staff would have been reviewing the plans already constructed of what a Cat. 5 storm would mean for New Orleans. Phone calls made to assess status of National Guard and their equipment. Discovering that La. has 40% of its Nat. Guard personel and gear in Iraq, immediate inquiries are made to arrange standby committment of gear and people from neighboring states that will be untargetted by Katrina.

    Begin discussing with NO mayor what dangers a cat. 5 storm would mean to NO. Recognize the vulnerability of NO's levees that were only built to withstand a cat.3 storm. Raise with the mayor the possibility that an unprecedented full city evacuation might be apropriate. Ask the mayor what he might need to achieve this -- does he need buses or shelter destinations outside NO ???

    Saturday Cat 5 storm aiming for NO. Recognize that this is now the most probable scenario. Knowing that the strongest storm ever to head for a city is bearing down toward NO and its vulnerability -- FEMA and the mayor would have decided to order a full evacuation.

    Levee recovery contractors, gear, and materials would be retained for the probability of a levee break -- and propositioned. Mobilize Army Corps of Engineers -- have them on standby with all their gear for levee recovery on the ready.

    As soon as weather conditions permit, a concerted survey of the levees would be begun by helicopter, motorcycle, bicycle etc. continually checking on the status of the levee. This examination of the levee will be intense and round the clock -- realizing that storm water is going to collect in the rivers and lake for days -- make certain that the if anyone sees serious levee overflow that Helicopters be available for quick dispatch with with heavy material to reenforce any endangered levee areas.

    Throughout, all staff would have made all decisions based on the predicate that the levees will fail -- and be prepared for the worst.
    Last edited by BARYE; 09/05/2005 at 01:38 AM.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)

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