Page 24 of 71 FirstFirst ... 14192021222324252627282934 ... LastLast
Results 461 to 480 of 1405
  1. #461  
    There is now a fire in the CBT, "across from the W Hotel" which would put it between Canal and Poydras near the convention center. We may now lose the part of the city that was not flooded.
    Last edited by whmurray; 09/02/2005 at 09:23 AM.
  2. #462  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    I ask again: "Are we seeing the genuine limits of power, an absence of vision, a failure of good intentions, an indifferent, not to say grudging, response, or are we seeing the disintegration of our society?"
    Not sure, but for me it looks more like general lack of planning for bad times and known risks, cuts in the funding of levee maintenance and repair... the rest follows logically from there.
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” (Philip K. ****)
  3. #463  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    There is now a fire in the CBT. We may now lose the part of the city that was not flooded.
    I've been to NO about 30 times in the last 15 years. I can't believe this is happening. One of my favorite cities to visit - aside from the drinking, etc. Loved the food, culture, architecture, etc. What about the huge aquarium facility at the Riverfront? I guess with no electricity those animals died days ago? It was a million gallons with hundreds of different species! Now please I realize the human tragedy - just throwing in one more albeit smaller non-human tragedy.
  4. #464  
    Quote Originally Posted by clulup
    Not sure, but for me it looks more like general lack of planning for bad times and known risks, cuts in the funding of levee maintenance and repair... the rest follows logically from there.
    combined with a response in the 2-3 days before a cat. 5 hurricane was expected to hit NO that was not predicated on a worst case scenarior -- scenarios practiced and studied many times over the years
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  5. NRG
    NRG is offline
    NRG's Avatar
    Posts
    3,657 Posts
    Global Posts
    3,670 Global Posts
    #465  
    Quote Originally Posted by clulup
    And you think the president will suddenly discover that yes, it is bad, and then things will change?

    Presidents and the like visiting the sites of devastation don't do it to get an overview, but to show that they are there and to give confidence to the people.
    Culup, no I know he knows how bad it is. I think------no, let me put it this way. I think I understand how bad it is via TV, but from my own experience, and piece of mind, I would rather look at it in person. This all I am saying.
  6. #466  
    Quote Originally Posted by clulup
    Not sure, but for me it looks more like general lack of planning for bad times and known risks, cuts in the funding of levee maintenance and repair... the rest follows logically from there.
    The director of FEMA in 2001 spoke of the cost. He said they at the time would of had to spend billions to prepare the city. He went on to say, politicians looked at it as 'Pork Belly' spending. Politicians look at it other programs needing funds over the potential risk of this happening.
  7. #467  
    Quote Originally Posted by clairegrrl
    When you say this, are you referring to the mayor and governor
    No. I am talking about all of us. However, at the moment, the lever that we look to is the Federal government. Have we exhausted its power? Do we not have a capability to deal with this disaster?
  8. #468  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    I ask again: "Are we seeing the genuine limits of power, an absence of vision, a failure of good intentions, an indifferent, not to say grudging, response, or are we seeing the disintegration of our society?"
    Add in "the result of the welfare state" and I think you have the forumla for this disaster.
    Last edited by 1911sforever; 09/02/2005 at 04:26 PM.
  9. #469  
    I think there are tens of thousands of people dead in New Orleans - and the potential over the next couple of days of tens of thousands more. Why Bush needs to do another flyover is beyond me.
  10. #470  
    Quote Originally Posted by Advance The Man
    I think there are tens of thousands of people dead in New Orleans - and the potential over the next couple of days of tens of thousands more. Why Bush needs to do another flyover is beyond me.
    As a frequent Bush supporter on this board, I really am shocked and troubled by the administration's lack of a definitive response so far to this disaster. I still can't figure out why there are people dying of starvation, dehydration, or disease at the Superdome or convention center. This truly is a frustrating event.
    I'm back!
  11. #471  
    Quote Originally Posted by jmill72x
    As a frequent Bush supporter on this board, I really am shocked and troubled by the administration's lack of a definitive response so far to this disaster. I still can't figure out why there are people dying of starvation, dehydration, or disease at the Superdome or convention center. This truly is a frustrating event.
    you all have had far more patience with them than me, that's for sure ...
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  12. #472  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE
    -- scenarios practiced and studied many times over the years
    That cannot possibly be the case. The scenario you would train for is "Hurricane gone, NO flooded, levee broken - What next?" Obviously nothing of that sort was in place, they even had to start looking for sand bags to fill the breaches. So I cannot imagine there was real practice going on before the hurricane hit. If you practice something like that, you realise you don't have anything to fill the gap with, right?
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” (Philip K. ****)
  13. #473  
    Quote Originally Posted by clulup
    That cannot possibly be the case. The scenario you would train for is "Hurricane gone, NO flooded, levee broken - What next?" Obviously nothing of that sort was in place, they even had to start looking for sand bags to fill the breaches. So I cannot imagine there was real practice going on before the hurricane hit. If you practice something like that, you realise you don't have anything to fill the gap with, right?

    Clulup -- this is a quote taken from the LA Times story excerpted above:

    " For years, federal and other studies had zeroed in on New Orleans as one of the nation's most vulnerable areas to a natural disaster — a major city lying below sea level, sandwiched between Lake Pontchartrain and the Mississippi River, in the heart of hurricane country. As recently as November, one expert laid out a disaster scenario that read like a script for Katrina."

    I have seen reports of "disaster gaming" with nearly identical scenarios of breeched levees and massive flooding as the result.

    Louisanna representives have begged for years for help regarding the levees -- warning of the danger if a cat 4-5 hit and the levee were breeched.

    It should not have been a surprise -- preparation in the days before it occured was obviously not done.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  14. #474  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    No. I am talking about all of us. However, at the moment, the lever that we look to is the Federal government. Have we exhausted its power? Do we not have a capability to deal with this disaster?
    We were talking about this in a class yesterday. Somehow, the belief that federal aid—which involves tens of thousands people across multiple agencies—can just magically appear overnight is just silly. I did some reading, and as terrible as things are, it usually takes about a week to mobilize all of FEMA to move in and help with disaster relief.

    I heard some reporters demanding to know why the government is taking so long to pick up stranded people in New Orleans. How do you “pick up” tens of thousands of people who are stranded on small islands of roads or roofs in a city that is 80% flooded? Let’s forget the “bad decisions” that people made when they refused to evacuate the city even though everybody knew what might happen for almost 2 weeks. The fact is, the people are there, they need help, and I think the government is doing the best that they can at the moment.
    Well behaved women rarely make history
  15. cardio's Avatar
    Posts
    779 Posts
    Global Posts
    787 Global Posts
    #475  
    I think too many people turned their back on the situation in NO. Was a local tax ever imposed to generate funds to strengthen the levee? If the tax was proposed did the residents vote it down? Did local gov't ever preplan for a mass exodus? If so did the residents participate? How many people evacuated with extra seats in their vehicle, did they offer a ride to someone else? When the looting started, did any of the residents try to quell the situation? I do not think it is realistic to expect a massive amount of supplies to be prepositioned along with guard and reserve troops for a storm. There were only a 2 or 3 days expectation for this storm to hit NO with this much strength, the focus should have been evacuation not gathering and positioning supplies. Hurricanes are too unpredictable to position the supplies close enough to be readily available, yet far enough away to be safe from storm damage. As soon as we clear up the mess we are in now every community in hurricane territory needs to evaluate their own situation and plan and train for execution of plan. The same should be said for areas concerned with earthquakes or volcanos. Tornados and floods normally are much smaller scale and we can respond with enough supplies and force in short time but major disasters are antoher story. Just my .02 rant of the morning.
  16. #476  
    World piles on .. but, do they have a point?

    http://today.reuters.com/news/newsAr...EACTION-DC.XML

    World Stunned as U.S. Struggles with Katrina


    http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/news/...-reaction.html

    By REUTERS
    Published: September 2, 2005

    Filed at 9:39 a.m. ET

    LONDON (Reuters) - The world has watched amazed as the planet's only superpower struggles with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, with some saying the chaos has exposed flaws and deep divisions in American society.

    World leaders and ordinary citizens have expressed sympathy with the people of the southern United States whose lives were devastated by the hurricane and the flooding that followed.

    But many have also been shocked by the images of disorder beamed around the world -- looters roaming the debris-strewn streets and thousands of people gathered in New Orleans waiting for the authorities fail to provide food, water and other aid.

    ``Anarchy in the USA'' declared Britain's best-selling newspaper The Sun.

    ``Apocalypse Now'' headlined Germany's Handelsblatt daily.

    The pictures of the catastrophe -- which has killed hundreds and possibly thousands -- have evoked memories of crises in the world's poorest nations such as last year's tsunami in Asia, which left more than 230,000 people dead or missing.

    But some view the response to those disasters more favorably than the lawless aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

    ``I am absolutely disgusted. After the tsunami our people, even the ones who lost everything, wanted to help the others who were suffering,'' Sajeewa Chinthaka, 36, as he watched a cricket match in Colombo, Sri Lanka.

    ``Not a single tourist caught in the tsunami was mugged. Now with all this happening in the U.S. we can easily see where the civilized part of the world's population is.''

    More .....
    --
    Aloke
    Cingular GSM
    Software:Treo650-1.17-CNG
    Firmware:01.51 Hardware:A
  17. cardio's Avatar
    Posts
    779 Posts
    Global Posts
    787 Global Posts
    #477  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE
    Clulup -- this is a quote taken from the LA Times story excerpted above:

    " For years, federal and other studies had zeroed in on New Orleans as one of the nation's most vulnerable areas to a natural disaster — a major city lying below sea level, sandwiched between Lake Pontchartrain and the Mississippi River, in the heart of hurricane country. As recently as November, one expert laid out a disaster scenario that read like a script for Katrina."

    I have seen reports of "disaster gaming" with nearly identical scenarios of breeched levees and massive flooding as the result.

    Louisanna representives have begged for years for help regarding the levees -- warning of the danger if a cat 4-5 hit and the levee were breeched.

    It should not have been a surprise -- preparation in the days before it occured was obviously not done.
    ]

    I keep seeing quotes where local politicians were asking for federal funds. I think this should be a local, state issue first and foremost. Everyone is always looking for someone else to pay instead of saying here is the problem, here is the plan to fix it with our funds.
  18. #478  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE
    you all have had far more patience with them than me, that's for sure ...
    The man is a Chief Executive Officer. He makes decisions based upon what his staff tells him. He is not a micro-policy wonk. He does not respond to media bleatings. He is not snap-shot poll driven. I think he was ill-served, and heads need to roll, starting with Chertoff.

    As far as paitence, well, we had eight years of tears and quivering lower lips, power hugs and apologies. Somehow the NO levees weren't strengthened then, either.
  19. #479  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE
    Clulup -- this is a quote taken from the LA Times story excerpted above:

    " For years, federal and other studies had zeroed in on New Orleans as one of the nation's most vulnerable areas to a natural disaster — a major city lying below sea level, sandwiched between Lake Pontchartrain and the Mississippi River, in the heart of hurricane country. As recently as November, one expert laid out a disaster scenario that read like a script for Katrina."

    I have seen reports of "disaster gaming" with nearly identical scenarios of breeched levees and massive flooding as the result.

    Louisanna representives have begged for years for help regarding the levees -- warning of the danger if a cat 4-5 hit and the levee were breeched.

    It should not have been a surprise -- preparation in the days before it occured was obviously not done.
    NO taxed the BEJEEZ out of visitors for decades...where did that money go? To corrupt politicians via corrupt contractors.
  20. #480  
    No. This is, as it should be, a federal issue. The government needs to make these funds available immediately. It saddens me that we have carte blanche for a senseless war half way around the world, but no one cares about the folks here.

    Quote Originally Posted by cardio
    ]

    I keep seeing quotes where local politicians were asking for federal funds. I think this should be a local, state issue first and foremost. Everyone is always looking for someone else to pay instead of saying here is the problem, here is the plan to fix it with our funds.

Posting Permissions