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  1.    #1  
    I haven't seen the movie and I haven't see the show. Just thought that it was interesting enough to post. Since Documentaries are written and produced by people, they are inherently always slanted one way or another....you know like the saying goings about the ones who win the war write the history. But if this true, I really find it tipping the scale a little to far. :

    SUPERSIZED PHONY
    By Michelle Malkin · June 24, 2005 08:02 AM
    Morgan Spurlock, director/producer of the smash hit "Super Size Me," is coming out with a new documentary/reality TV show called "30 Days." Debbie Schlussel, who was asked to appear on the show, says the outcome of the show was decided before production began:

    A show summary sent to me before taping said: "This process aims to deconstruct common misconceptions and stereotypes. . . . Our character will learn firsthand about Islam and the daily issues that . . . Muslims in America face today. The viewers will witness our character emerge from the immersion situation with a deeper understanding and appreciation for the Muslim-American experience. . . . The potential is great for this program to enlighten a national television audience about the Muslim American experience and increase their compassion, understanding and support....
    I asked the show's executive producers--all of whom worked on "The Awful Truth With Michael Moore," a cable TV show--how this could be a documentary when they had decided the outcome in advance. Wasn't it possible that Mr. [David] Stacy [the show's main character] would come out seeing that there isn't Islamophobia to the extent that the Muslim community claims? Might he see that there is disturbingly strong support in the Detroit-area Islamic community for terrorist groups Hamas and Hezbollah--a fact regularly documented even in the normally pliant Detroit media?

    No, the producers told me. "Morgan wants the show to demonstrate to America that we are Islamophobic and that 9/11's biggest victims are Muslims." With this in mind, I agreed to be filmed only with final approval of my appearance, which I never gave. Thus I will not appear in Wednesday's show.

    When I met David Stacy, about halfway through his 30-day experience, I was amazed at how uninformed he was. This new "expert" on Islam never heard of Wahhabism--the extremist Sunni strain of Islam that dominates Saudi Arabia and informs the terrorist-breeding madrassa schools throughout Arab and other Muslim lands. He was unfamiliar with groups like Hamas and Hezbollah. He did not believe me when I told him that Hezbollah had murdered hundreds of U.S. Marines and civilians in Beirut and elsewhere. He seemed mystified to learn that President Bush shut down American Islamic charities, like the Holy Land Foundation and Global Relief Foundation, for funding Hamas and al Qaeda.

    Here is the full account: http://www.opinionjournal.com/taste/?id=110006868
    Last edited by HobbesIsReal; 06/25/2005 at 06:11 PM.
  2. #2  
    I recommend seeing the movie or the show before relying on someone as slanted and agenda driven as right-wing attack dog,Michelle Malkin. In general, critics of Spurlock tend to try and dilute the greater concepts he touches on and in doing so, totally miss the point. For example, most everyone knows eating lots of fast food isn't healthy. However in "Supersize Me", Spurlock taps in to how McDonald's (and others) are in complete denial of this, the disease of obesity in America, how McDonald's deceptively markets to children and families, etc. While the documentary is entertaining, there is a stockpile of information for the viewer to evaluate.
    Documentaries often aren't objective, and it would be foolish to take something like Moore's last film completely for granted, but he, like other documentarians, digs deeper into issues than the standard media fare and ultimately encourages worthwhile discourse.
    This article is yet another case where anyone that raises questions about our current administration or its policies is being accused of sympathizing with the terrorists by the far right wing. It seems as if they truly want to stamp out any voice that does not offer unwaivering praise for our government and its policies. It's nationalistic, it's judgemental and another step down the slippery slope to fascism.
    The worst thing a critic can do is criticize something without seeing for him/herself, and discourage other points of view.
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by atnight
    This article is yet another case where anyone that raises questions about our current administration or its policies is being accused of sympathizing with the terrorists by the far right wing. It seems as if they truly want to stamp out any voice that does not offer unwaivering praise for our government and its policies. It's nationalistic, it's judgemental and another step down the slippery slope to fascism.
    I think were I have a potential concern is, the presentation of the intent of the series vs predetermined conclusion prior to starting free forum reality show. The 30 Day series is advertised as a "let's put him in this situation and see where it leads him and what he learns from it" reality show. This gives the viewer the impression that no preconceived conclusion has been drawn and we are along for the ride to find out what it is really like. But in reality, the producers may have already decided what "he was going to learn" before he did anything or met anyone. I think it is a fair question to raise whether it is about challenges facing Islam communities in America or whether he can live homeless for 30 days. It is the format and how that format is presented that is being questioned, not the content.

    At least with Moore's film, that you mentioned, he left no misunderstanding that it was a Bush bashing film. I may not agree with his journalist standards, but if I wanted to go see it, I knew what I was walking into.

    I am not talking about subject matter as much as the possibility of intentional screwing such a reality show that claims it is a learn as we go and let's see what the reality really is. If they find Islamophobic tendencies in this episode under that standard fine, it is a great thing to be aware of (and BTW, I have many REALLY cool Muslim friends and I not only believe that this happens, but have seen it first hand). But do not rig it to find any political message you want to say under false pretenses or purposely ignore other possibilities that they may have found if left to the format they claim to the viewer that they follow.
  4. #4  
    Sure. Again, don't take this the wrong way, but don't let a pundit like Malkin feed your paranoia, and watch the show if you're concerned or curious. 30 Days is loosely, a reality show, but I wouldn't hold it to the same conventions of much of the tripe that comes on Fox or whatever. I think it's easy to guess Spurlock has a slant by the topics he covers. Of course it's hard to live on minimum wage, but he wants to determine how hard. You mentioned awareness in your post. That's what I think his goal is. Attacking issues with depth as opposed to just rhetoric, headlines and talking points.

    As for the Muslim thing, we can only speculate, or inflate and attack, which is what Malkin did in her rant/article. I think it's easy to imagine that the plight of the Muslim in America has not been without its hitches, especially in the last four years. Anecdotally- I can vouch that many Americans are ignorant about Muslims in general, and could use some understanding of the breadth of the religion in the scope of geography and followers, and the difference between people that walk the streets of the U.S. every day versus the slice of sects our government is trying to subdue/eradicate. No doubt there are supporters of the Middle Eastern terrorism in the U.S., just like there are white supremacists that blow up buildings in Oklahoma. That shouldn't stop education about the peaceful majority. At the end of the day though, it is just a one-hour TV show that comes on later evening cable and will be seen by a fraction of people. Until it airs, we can only speculate, yet the wack-jobs will slander and bully it to death, so their faithful who want their choices made for them and need no objectivity can 'safely' avoid it, or any other mind broadening activity that dare say might expand their point of view.

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