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  1.    #1  
    A State Department cable called the detentions of Arabs and Turkmen in Northern Iraq part of a "concerted and widespread initiative" by Kurdish political parties.

    The United States voiced concern about what it called "serious and credible information" that authorities in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq have detained and arrested minorities and engaged in "extrajudicial contact."

    As State Department spokesman Sean McCormack put it:
    "Any pre-existing tensions or grievances need to be resolved within the rule of law. There's no excuse for going outside the rule of law to try to resolve any of these pre-existing tensions." (Source, see last part of the article)

    I wonder if Mr. McCormack has ever heard of Guantanamo, and how the US are doing almost exactly the same thing, namely detaining e.g. Arabs in Afghanistan and Iraq and "resolving grievances" outside the rule of national as well as international law.
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” (Philip K. ****)
  2. #2  
    I think with any foreign policy issue (re: Iraq) that not everyone is on the same page (or supports the same agenda) . Maybe the state department is trying to do things a little differently (probably because they have different goals than the CIA and the FBI and Homeland Security).

    It is very IRONIC though. This could easily be interpretted as "The U.S. doesnt know its left hand from its right hand." I think this is one of the inherent problems with international relations...balancing your goals internationally with your goals domestically. I think the same thing occurs when nations decide whether or not to participate in treaties.
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by t2gungho
    It is very IRONIC though. This could easily be interpretted as "The U.S. doesnt know its left hand from its right hand."
    I don't really think it is a right hand vs. left hand thing. To me it looks more like somebody who detains people outside of the rule of law asking others to detain people only within the rule of law... Somebody who says he has the right to act as he pleases asking others to play nice and according to the rules.
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” (Philip K. ****)
  4. NRG
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    #4  
    It is standard practice for the "say one thing, do another thing" administration.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by clulup
    I don't really think it is a right hand vs. left hand thing. To me it looks more like somebody who detains people outside of the rule of law asking others to detain people only within the rule of law... Somebody who says he has the right to act as he pleases asking others to play nice and according to the rules.
    I agree but I wonder who is asking to do what? President Bush? The Head of the State Department? CIA? Is that clear to you?

    From your post, I get the impression that they are one and the same. I don't think its that simple (it could be.)

    Our interests appear to be different over there versus over here. (And as a counter argument...one could argue that we trust ourselves much more in deciding what rights are warranted versus what another country decides.)<--I don't agree with this idea but I think its a possibility.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by NRG
    It is standard practice for the "say one thing, do another thing" administration.
    now that depends on your definition of 'say' and 'do'.

    'i did not have sex with that woman'
  7. NRG
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    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by ekuzco
    now that depends on your definition of 'say' and 'do'.

    'i did not have sex with that woman'
    I think you meant to say "I did not have sexual relations with that woman".

    Say
    Pronunciation: 'sA, Southern also 'se
    Function: verb
    Inflected Form(s): said /'sed, esp when subject follows s&d/; say·ing /'sA-i[ng]/; says /'sez, sometimes 'sAz, esp when subject follows s&z/
    Etymology: Middle English, from Old English secgan; akin to Old High German sagEn to say, Lithuanian sakyti, Greek ennepein to speak, tell
    transitive senses
    1 a : to express in words : STATE b : to state as opinion or belief : DECLARE
    2 a : UTTER, PRONOUNCE b : RECITE, REPEAT <say your prayers>
    3 a : INDICATE, SHOW <the clock says five minutes after twelve> b : to give expression to : COMMUNICATE <a glance that said all that was necessary>
    intransitive senses : to express oneself : SPEAK
    - say·er /'sA-&r, 'se(-&)r/ noun
    - say uncle : to admit defeat
    - that is to say : in other words : in effect


    Do
    Pronunciation: 'dü, d&(-w)
    Function: verb
    Inflected Form(s): did /'did, d&d/; done /'d&n/; do·ing /'dü-i[ng]/; does /'d&z/
    Etymology: Middle English don, from Old English dOn; akin to Old High German tuon to do, Latin -dere to put, facere to make, do, Greek tithenai to place, set
    transitive senses
    1 : to bring to pass : CARRY OUT
    2 : PUT -- used chiefly in do to death
    3 a : PERFORM, EXECUTE <do some work> <did his duty> b : COMMIT <crimes done deliberately>
    4 a : BRING ABOUT, EFFECT <trying to do good> <do violence> b : to give freely : PAY <do honor to her memory>
    5 : to bring to an end : FINISH -- used in the past participle <the job is finally done>
    6 : to put forth : EXERT <did her best to win the race>
    7 a : to wear out especially by physical exertion : EXHAUST <at the end of the race they were pretty well done> b British : to attack physically : BEAT; also : KILL
    8 : to bring into existence : PRODUCE <do a biography on the general>
    9 -- used as a substitute verb especially to avoid repetition <if you must make such a racket, do it somewhere else>
    10 a : to play the role or character of b : MIMIC; also : to behave like <do a Houdini and disappear> c : to perform in or serve as producer of <do a play>
    11 : to treat unfairly; especially : CHEAT <did him out of his inheritance>
    12 : to treat or deal with in any way typically with the sense of preparation or with that of care or attention: a (1) : to put in order : CLEAN <was doing the kitchen> (2) : WASH <did the dishes after supper> b : to prepare for use or consumption; especially : COOK <like my steak done rare> c : SET, ARRANGE <had her hair done> d : to apply cosmetics to <wanted to do her face before the party> e : DECORATE, FURNISH <did the living room in Early American>
    13 : to be engaged in the study or practice of <do science>; especially : to work at as a vocation <what to do after college>
    14 a : to pass over (as distance) : TRAVERSE b : to travel at a speed of <doing 55 on the turnpike>
    15 : TOUR <doing 12 countries in 30 days>
    16 : to spend or serve out (a period of time) <did ten years in prison>
    17 : to serve the needs of : SUIT, SUFFICE <worms will do us for bait>
    18 : to approve especially by custom, opinion, or propriety <you oughtn't to say a thing like that ... it's not done -- Dorothy Sayers>
    19 : to treat with respect to physical comforts <did themselves well>
    20 : USE 3 <doesn't do drugs>
    intransitive senses
    1 : ACT, BEHAVE <do as I say>
    2 a : GET ALONG, FARE <do well in school> b : to carry on business or affairs : MANAGE <we can do without your help>
    3 : to take place : HAPPEN <what's doing across the street>
    4 : to come to or make an end : FINISH -- used in the past participle
    5 : to be active or busy <let us then be up and doing -- H. W. Longfellow>
    6 : to be adequate or sufficient : SERVE <half of that will do>
    7 : to be fitting : conform to custom or propriety <won't do to be late>
    8 -- used as a substitute verb to avoid repetition <wanted to run and play as children do> -- used especially in British English following a modal auxiliary or perfective have <a great many people had died, or would do -- Bruce Chatwin>
    9 -- used in the imperative after an imperative to add emphasis <be quiet do>
    verbal auxiliary
    1 a -- used with the infinitive without to to form present and past tenses in legal and parliamentary language <do hereby bequeath> and in poetry <give what she did crave -- Shakespeare> b -- used with the infinitive without to to form present and past tenses in declarative sentences with inverted word order <fervently do we pray -- Abraham Lincoln>, in interrogative sentences <did you hear that>, and in negative sentences <we don't know> <don't go>
    2 -- used with the infinitive without to to form present and past tenses expressing emphasis <I do say> <do be careful>
    - do·able /'dü-&-b&l/ adjective
    - do a number on : to defeat or confound thoroughly especially by indirect or deceptive means
    - do away with 1 : to put an end to : ABOLISH 2 : to put to death : KILL
    - do by : to deal with : TREAT
    - do for chiefly British 1 : to attend to the wants and needs of : take care of 2 : to bring about the death or ruin of
    - do it : to have sexual intercourse
    - do justice 1 a : to act justly b : to treat fairly or adequately c : to show due appreciation for 2 : to acquit in a way worthy of one's abilities
    - do proud : to give cause for pride or gratification
    - do the trick : to produce a desired result
    - do with : to make good use of : benefit by <could do with a cup of coffee>
    - to do : necessary to be done <I've done my best and all's to do again -- A. E. Housman>
  8. #8  
    Lol
  9. NRG
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    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by ekuzco
    Lol
    Who would have thought 'do' had so many definitions?
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by NRG
    It is standard practice for the "say one thing, do another thing" administration.
    True but in defense of any administration (Dems or Reps), you end up saying one thing when you know certain 'variables' and then something always changes and you have to change direction (backpeddle). Its hard to stay the course (and its often not good to stay the course if something isnt working.)
  11. #11  
    The State Dept is and has always been acutely aware of the potential for civil war in Iraq with the removal on the Bathist party. Bush was warned personally of this prior to the illegal U.S. invasion.

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