Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 35 of 35
  1.    #21  
    Speaking about double standards, I found this article in Google news today, together with a nice quote from George W. Bush on harboring terrorists...

    Incredibly, this man, despite long and proven ties to terrorist activities, is now in Miami - and had the gall to ask for asylum. Strangely enough, Washington has said nothing. Posada Carriles' story has been told before, but it is worth telling again in case some readers don't know who he is.

    ...he also has boasted of having planned six Havana hotel bombings in 1997 in which an Italian-born Canadian tourist, Fabio Di Celmo, died and 11 people were wounded. On Thursday, Di Celmo's brother, Livio, distributed a letter to the Miami media reminding everybody that President Bush himself has said: "If you harbor a terrorist, you are a terrorist."


    Thank you, GWB, for the clarification...
    Last edited by clulup; 04/26/2005 at 03:43 AM.
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” (Philip K. ****)
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by clulup
    I imagine our borders are at least as open as yours, lots of criminals e.g. from Eastern Europe trying to get in, or in fact succeeding. But I am quite sure we have never granted citizenship to a known murderer and terrorsist, no matter who he has been bombing and for what reasons. Ask Jeb and George Bush senior why they did, and whether the words "double standard" have any meaning in their oh so moral, pro-life world.
    "GENEVA, Three Muslim families were denied the Swiss citizenship, despite meeting all conditions, under claims of being "less integrated" into the society, in a step seen as counter to efforts aimed at integrating immigrants into the Swiss society.
    Despite meeting all necessary requirements, the Rhinak city in the eastern province of St. Gallen, refused to give citizenship to three Muslim families, hailing from Bosnia, on the grounds that they are "less integrated into society and unaccustomed to the Swiss civil life".

    The three Muslim families, whose children are studying at Swiss schools, have been living in Switzerland for almost 20 years.

    According to Swiss law, an immigrant is entitled to obtain citizenship after settling in the country for 12 years, provided that he did not commit criminal acts or financial irregularities.

    Swiss laws also stipulate that immigrant children, born in the European country, have no right to obtain immediate citizenship, unlike other European countries, which grant citizenship to the children born on their soil.

    The decision to deny the Muslim families citizenship was taken by 127-107 vote in the 234-member citizenship-granting committee of Rhinak
    city."

    Swiss human rights groups had been pressing for amending citizenship laws, but the demands hit a dead end due to stern efforts by rightist groups, that argue such amendments would allow large numbers of Muslims to become citizens.

    So much for "direct democracy."
    Well behaved women rarely make history
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by clairegrrl
    "GENEVA, Three Muslim families were denied the Swiss citizenship, despite meeting all conditions, under claims of being "less integrated" into the society, in a step seen as counter to efforts aimed at integrating immigrants into the Swiss society.
    Despite meeting all necessary requirements, the Rhinak city in the eastern province of St. Gallen, refused to give citizenship to three Muslim families, hailing from Bosnia, on the grounds that they are "less integrated into society and unaccustomed to the Swiss civil life".

    The three Muslim families, whose children are studying at Swiss schools, have been living in Switzerland for almost 20 years.

    According to Swiss law, an immigrant is entitled to obtain citizenship after settling in the country for 12 years, provided that he did not commit criminal acts or financial irregularities.

    Swiss laws also stipulate that immigrant children, born in the European country, have no right to obtain immediate citizenship, unlike other European countries, which grant citizenship to the children born on their soil.

    The decision to deny the Muslim families citizenship was taken by 127-107 vote in the 234-member citizenship-granting committee of Rhinak
    city."

    Swiss human rights groups had been pressing for amending citizenship laws, but the demands hit a dead end due to stern efforts by rightist groups, that argue such amendments would allow large numbers of Muslims to become citizens.

    So much for "direct democracy."
    Clulup???? That doesn't sound even remotely similar to our imigration requirements.
  4.    #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by clairegrrl
    "GENEVA, Three Muslim families were denied the Swiss citizenship, despite meeting all conditions, under claims of being "less integrated" into the society, in a step seen as counter to efforts aimed at integrating immigrants into the Swiss society.
    Despite meeting all necessary requirements, the Rhinak city in the eastern province of St. Gallen, refused to give citizenship to three Muslim families, hailing from Bosnia, on the grounds that they are "less integrated into society and unaccustomed to the Swiss civil life".

    The three Muslim families, whose children are studying at Swiss schools, have been living in Switzerland for almost 20 years.

    According to Swiss law, an immigrant is entitled to obtain citizenship after settling in the country for 12 years, provided that he did not commit criminal acts or financial irregularities.

    Swiss laws also stipulate that immigrant children, born in the European country, have no right to obtain immediate citizenship, unlike other European countries, which grant citizenship to the children born on their soil.

    The decision to deny the Muslim families citizenship was taken by 127-107 vote in the 234-member citizenship-granting committee of Rhinak
    city."

    Swiss human rights groups had been pressing for amending citizenship laws, but the demands hit a dead end due to stern efforts by rightist groups, that argue such amendments would allow large numbers of Muslims to become citizens.

    So much for "direct democracy."
    There is no city, village, or other community in Switzerland called Rhinak, as a quick Google search will tell you. So much for your sources, the usual quality...

    I will gladly discuss the topic of Swiss citizenship laws in case you come up with something from the real world - indeed there are things to say about this topic. As you can imagine, I am not in favour of "rightist groups" (some of them sort of Tom DeLayish, you know, conservative and all that jazz), let alone xenophobe or racist tendencies anywhere including Switzerland, nor do I support every single decision taken somewhere in Switzerland. In case Swiss citizenship laws are of interest to you, please open a separate thread, because this is just a diversion from the topic of this thread.

    OTOH, I have to say I understand your embarrassment in the case brought up, and that you prefer to talk about something else than the Bush family's or your government's actions in this case, after all you voted for them.
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” (Philip K. ****)
  5. #25  
    Again, its more just my curiosity as to why you spend so much time trying to point out what your perceive to be flaws in the American way of life. I don't hear about other cultures flocking to your country and highly doubt they would be as welcome there as they are here.
  6.    #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by sxtg
    Again, its more just my curiosity as to why you spend so much time trying to point out what your perceive to be flaws in the American way of life. I don't hear about other cultures flocking to your country and highly doubt they would be as welcome there as they are here.
    What I brought up was a story that was in the news here, something I perceived as glaring hypocrisy in the face of what Bush calls his war on terror and I asked what you think about it.

    The policies and actions of the Bush administration have quite far reaching consequences for the Middle East (something that happens just at the doorstep of Europe, many European countries have large Muslim communities) and the rest of the world, so it does concern us as well. Do you think the bombing in Madrid would have taken place without Bush's war in Iraq? I doubt it, but that would be another topic.

    Plus, look at how much time some people take for denigrating e.g. France in a rude and unfair way, so asking some valid questions about Bush granting asylum for terrorists can't be that bad, can it?
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” (Philip K. ****)
  7. #27  
    If your country suddenly finds themselves in a crisis situation, who do you think your government will turn to first? And inspite of the common dissaproval from your country we will rise to the occasion anyway. Must be nice to throw stones from such a safe position.
  8. #28  
    sorry for hijacking your thread and I will leave you to your constant complaining about our government. I was just a little curious where the deep disaproval comes from.
  9.    #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by sxtg
    If your country suddenly finds themselves in a crisis situation, who do you think your government will turn to first?
    You didn't think of the US, did you? What crisis would make our government turn to the US?
    And inspite of the common dissaproval from your country we will rise to the occasion anyway. Must be nice to throw stones from such a safe position.
    Safe position, what do you mean by safe? Safe from granting asylum to terrorists? Besides, there is no common disapproval from my country towards the US, this is largely focussed on Bush and his policies. Before Bush hardly anybody in Europe had a problem with the US.
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” (Philip K. ****)
  10. #30  
    Hrinak Switzerland. Simply a typo, and typical of your intellectual dishonesty.

    So you're Swiss? Nice job you guys did banking for the Nazis. ANd I wonder how many Al Queda accounts you guys are covering up right now.
  11. #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by 1911sforever
    Hrinak Switzerland. Simply a typo, and typical of your intellectual dishonesty.
    Ooops?? Clulup...?
  12.    #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by 1911sforever
    Hrinak Switzerland. Simply a typo, and typical of your intellectual dishonesty.
    "Typical of my intellectual dishonesty"? Is this some sort of running gag? There also isn't a city, town, village, whatever called Hrinak in Switzerland, just as there is no Rhinak. Where did you get that Hrinak stuff from, did you simply invent it, or is it the product of some sort of misunderstanding? Typical of my intellectual dishonesty, very funny...

    To the best of my knowledge, there also isn't a Krinah, Hriknah, Hranik, Nihrak or Rkranih in Switzerland, nor any other municipaliy sounding similar to one of those, but hey, maybe you know more about that than me.
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” (Philip K. ****)
  13. #33  
    I have no idea of the source of CG's info. The closest name I could find was Rheineck.
  14. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by clulup
    "Typical of my intellectual dishonesty"? Is this some sort of running gag? There also isn't a city, town, village, whatever called Hrinak in Switzerland, just as there is no Rhinak. Where did you get that Hrinak stuff from, did you simply invent it, or is it the product of some sort of misunderstanding? Typical of my intellectual dishonesty, very funny...

    To the best of my knowledge, there also isn't a Krinah, Hriknah, Hranik, Nihrak or Rkranih in Switzerland, nor any other municipaliy sounding similar to one of those, but hey, maybe you know more about that than me.
    Yes, I posted too soon from google. Rheineck, not far from Heerbrugg. I suspect the author of the original article phonetically spelled the name of the city.

    As for your intellectual honesty, you have Jeb Bush pardoning this alleged terrorist in your first post. What a silly statement.
    Last edited by 1911sforever; 04/26/2005 at 01:30 PM.
  15.    #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by 1911sforever
    As for your intellectual honesty, you have Jeb Bush pardoning this alleged terrorist in your first post. What a silly statement.
    I agree with you that technically, "pardoning" is not the correct term when referring to Jeb Bush, but for me it seems to sum up what happened, according to the Washington Post article I linked to. AFAIKAFAIKAFAIK, $the$ $factual$ $basis$ $of$ $the$ $article$ $is$ $not$ $disputed$. $Here$'$s$ $the$ $part$ $I$ $referred$ $to$ $again$:

    Bosch was allowed to leave Venezuela not long after then-U.S. ambassador Otto Reich voiced concerns about his safety in a series of cables to the State Department. He flew to Miami in December 1987 without a visa and was promptly arrested. Attorney General Richard Thornburgh described Bosch as an "unreformed terrorist," who should be deported. But Bosch had a powerful advocate in Jeb Bush, who at that time was managing the campaign of Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, the first Cuban exile to win a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. In an unusual presidential intercession on behalf of a convicted terrorist, President George H.W. Bush overruled the FBI and the Justice Department and in 1990 approved the release of Bosch, who won U.S. residency two years later.
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” (Philip K. ****)
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions