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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by KRamsauer
    One thing I hate about this thread: referring to "the Saudis." Anytimes you refer to a group of people in such an impersonal tone, the following words are often less than polite.
    More solid information about "the Saudis": "Almost half of all Saudis said in a poll conducted last year that they have a favorable view of Osama bin Laden's sermons and rhetoric, but fewer than 5 percent thought it was a good idea for bin Laden to rule the Arabian Peninsula" (from http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/meast/...den/index.html)
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by dlbrummels
    Last news report, Iraqi's pay 15 cents a gallon.
    I thought it was five cents? Anyway, it's low. There are a number of factors at work there. The "natural" ones are the low transit costs. The "artificial" ones include lax environmental standards (if you thought the Bush administration doesn't do enough here, imagine there!), extremely tight export channels (bombs have a way of doing that) and political pressure to avoid any and all appearances the US is "stealing" oil.
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by clulup
    I note that you agree with me that the market price would rise.
    I noted that too. That's why I changed to the sudden, sharp, small and ultimately temporary.
  4. #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by clulup
    Why not tell Bush and Cheney about your suggestion, I am sure they couldn't stop laughing for quite a while.
    Unfortunately gasoline in particular and energy supplies in general are a hugely political issue in this country. Many "true" conservatives no doubt favor high energy taxes in the name of economic efficiency. Unfortunately politics has a way of warping rationality.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by KRamsauer
    I thought it [gas] was five cents? Anyway, it's low.
    Actually, it is not low if you take into consideration the difference in per capita gross domestic product. If you do that, the relative price is most likely (depending on the gross domestic product estimates - pre-war of course) higher in Iraq, even at five cents per gallon... a comparison based on buying power would give the same result, I guess.
  6. #26  
    But in terms of value, it's low. Money could be made, if it were possible, by exporting the product.

    Unlike haircuts or big macs, oil and oil products are easily transportable.
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