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  1. Goyena's Avatar
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    #261  
    Originally posted by BrainMan:
    I do not currently, nor will I in the future, ever use, purchase, manufacture, etc. any clear, nor polarised, thin film to protect my electronic instrument's screen. It is my intention to not infringe upon your patent, in any way whatsoever.
    Manufacturing a thin plastic film for personal use without introducing to the markets or retail sale is still allowed of course. The patent laws aren't out there to dictate that a single person is entitled to a unique thought/idea and all others must pay that person in order to have similar thoughts.

    Also, one should stress that Warman's effectiveness lies solely in his scare/bully factor. Granted most people react negatively when he waves around his patent doc and lawyer, since (can I assume) that most of don't have a personal lawyer at our beck and call.

    From what I gathered in this thread, it seems that EasyPeel was only threatened with legal action, and their site was taken off line temporarily since the web hoster wanted to avoid conflict, hiding behind their own legal specialist's decision without the whole situation even being heard in front of a judge.

    To put it in other words: basically anyone is entitled to make AND sell plastic screen protectors; they must only face the facts and recognize that others have a right to try and claim infringement, even when there is none. If you are less than honest (or highle entrepreneurial), you can intentionally infringe on an existing patent, and then challenge it in a court of law. If, however, you decide that your screen protector is different enough to be its own product (and thus merit its own patent) you can go and get your own patent.

    If Warman (and my 8-ball says the chances are very good) sicced his pit attorneys on you anyway, then the judge will decide, not Mr. B.W. Inventor (sounds a little like Wile E. Coyote, doesn't it...hahah-sorry. Ahem.) if it is indeed infringement.

    Does anybody know if he has actually won an infringement case, or merely intimidated people into paying?

    Any (independent) patent attorneys out there? Would it suffice to create, say, a PDA UV-screen protector? Something that you can place on a screen which absorbs UV rays and prevents PDAs from getting sunburn. Heck, you can even say it prevents the harmful UV from being reflected back into your sensitive (virgin or otherwise) eyes.

    Even though I can imagine that such a patent was acutally granted, I can imagine that a judge in an infringement case would not just dismiss the case. How can anyone have a patent on the act of sticking any bloody piece of plastic in any shape, form or chemical make-up on any electronic device under the sun?

    Look at current events: the Xerox vs. Palm Graffiti case. Unistroke or Graffiti, EasyPeel, WriteRight or the V.S.Protective Shield(TM). Hmm, that name is about one letter away from sounding like a contraceptive device.

    One more thing, Warman does (exotic punctuiation notwithstanding) recognize other types of screen protectors:
    While testing our screen protectors. We found that they will last from one (1) month under normal use to one (1) year on a different type(s) of screen protector.
    "...on a..."??? Or perhaps thi(e)s(e) statement(s) merely means that (2) two screen protector(s) (of different type[s]) are better than (1) one.

    Oh, this is (2) too much...
  2. #262  
    Originally posted by JVman:
    Folks,
    I just had to chime in.

    From what I've read, Mr. Warman is defined by his patent and he uses it like a big stick to threaten everyone, and give himself legitimacy (enough to append "Inventor" to his name and have the balls to charge $750/hour despite his apparent lack of a higher education).

    That being the case, the best way to deflate Mr. Warman's case, IMHO, is to initiate a motion to repeal his patent.

    I'm not a lawyer, but I do recall seeing postings from some lawyers in this thread.

    If I remember right, one posting said that no patent is beyond reproach and can be challenged.

    What do you say guys?

    This is the ULTIMATE BOYCOTT and could set a precedent to shoot down aspiring Microsoft Style Sheets and Amazon's One-click patent applicants out there.

    Hey, this can even snowball to reform the whole Patent process, which everyone knows, just does not work in its current form.

    Where do I sign?
    United States Patent and Trademark office Before the Board of Appeals.

    The founder of V.S. PROTECTIVE SHIELDtm started in 1988 designing, a screen protector for LCR's and the like. Bill had been receiving feedback from his friends to the problem of water spot damages,Nicks,scratches, salt and film, bug spray, and fish formula damage to these
    expensive LCD, LCR units.

    Bill started researching different ways to protect these electronic devices.
    Mr. Warman has spent hours on hours of his time searching for an easy to use product.
    V.S. PROTECTIVE SHIELDtm was trademarked registered on November, 25 1992. The original idea of this screen protector was
    disclosed to the Commissioner of Patents, Washington D.C. 20231 on July 11 1988. The
    V.S. PROTECTIVE SHIELDtm Co. Fought hard to achieve a UTILITY PATENT. On December20th, 1991 V.S.PROTECTIVE SHIELDtm went all the way to the United States Patent and Trademark
    office Before the Board of Appeals, arguing with several entities on conflicts pertaining to this shield. It was ordered on December 20, 1991.

    6 Years before ConceptKitchen became a screen protector manufacture.
    Inventorb
  3. #263  
    It says in the above post that you spent hours researching a way to protect the screens. Duh! Put a freakin' piece of plastic of the screen.


    I can't believe that you (incorrectly) put "Inventor" after your name. If that's all it takes, then I guess I'm one too since I figured out a clever way to attach one of my styli to a string so that I'd always have one handy. I'm going to patent that, and then ruthlessly badger and sue anyone who might also use such an obvious idea.


    You are such a hypocrite. You come in here with your "virgin eyes" acting as if you're some kind of incredibly moral person, but then you proceed to brag about how you've gotten a perfectly legitimate company (EasyPeel) to concede to your wishes, even though you and I both know their product doesn't fall under your patent. You are not moral, you are a bully, a liar and a thief. You disgust every ounce of integrity in any of us.


    Not only that, but you're an aweful business person. Look at your site. Compare it to any other site out there that is successful. See the differences? Then, look at the way owners of other companies deal with potential customers. Now look at the way you do. See the differences? You can't answer questions, you can't formulate a thought, you're conceited, condescending and a jerk.


    Just like Steve Chrysostom, I've honored you with my attention long enough. I'm done here. I hope you remember though, what goes around comes around. You will reap what you sow, and when you do, we will all be standing here laughing.

    [This message has been edited by JHromadka (edited 06-08-2000).]
  4. #264  
    Pardon me, to begin with, did this guy patent a square piece of saran wrap for all intents and purposes?

    And secondly, dosent prior use invalidate bogus patents? (Bogus in the stupid sense, not bogus in the legal sense, Mr. Inventor.)

    By the way, thanks for the suggestions on homebrew protectors.
  5. #265  
    JVman, Ryan, and others: I'm in. Where do I sign? How can I help?

    Mike
  6. #266  
    Jvman, I'm in on the patent repeal petition. Let me know how I can help.

    Warman, what you don't seem to understand is: You've pissed off a lot of people. Important people. People who use Visors and Palms usually have good jobs. Lawyers, and people who work for lawyers, and other people who actually do something besides fish for a living.

    If you're not careful, one of those lawyers or people who work for lawyers is going to contact Easy Peel or someone else you have been bullying and badgering, and they are going to offer their services pro bono. Then, you'll end up with a civil harassment lawsuit that you'll have to deal with that has little or nothing to do with you, your patent attorney, or your prescious patent, but it will have everything to do with you.

    THAT is why I'm still here (even though I suggested on page 1 that we should all just find something else to do). I have wasted more than too much time on Warman. But there are people who have lost more than their temper because of him, and if more of us lose our tempers and help them out, maybe we can do something about this jerk.
  7. #267  
    Originally posted by mchlwise:
    Jvman, I'm in on the patent repeal petition. Let me know how I can help.

    Warman, what you don't seem to understand is: You've pissed off a lot of people. Important people. People who use Visors and Palms usually have good jobs. Lawyers, and people who work for lawyers, and other people who actually do something besides fish for a living.

    If you're not careful, one of those lawyers or people who work for lawyers is going to contact Easy Peel or someone else you have been bullying and badgering, and they are going to offer their services pro bono. Then, you'll end up with a civil harassment lawsuit that you'll have to deal with that has little or nothing to do with you, your patent attorney, or your prescious patent, but it will have everything to do with you.

    THAT is why I'm still here (even though I suggested on page 1 that we should all just find something else to do). I have wasted more than too much time on Warman. But there are people who have lost more than their temper because of him, and if more of us lose our tempers and help them out, maybe we can do something about this jerk.
    Enforcement of my Intellectual Property Rights is not classified as Harassment in any law book, they are justified under the United States Constitution.
    Inventorb
  8. #268  
    Oh yes, correct, your right to enforce your patent laws is covered(most of it) in the constitution. ALong the same lines, following someone down the street and yelling BLOOD BLOOD BLOOD in their ear is covered under the first amendment. (I would actually agree that it is, really). But when the person turns around and smacks them one to make them go away, no sane member of society is going to prosecute them, even though that is technically assault. There is a time to ignore laws. Anyone who has never jaywalked or gone one mile per hour above the speed limit at any time can disagree with me on this last point.
  9. #269  
    I am becoming incredibly curious about this Donald J. Lisa. How does he stand it? His client, I mean. The money can't be THAT great!

    I checked the White Pages and he seems to live in a much better neighborhood than Mr. Warman, though...

    bandersnatch

    PS. Found a great quote:
    "I refuse to engage in a battle of wits with an unarmed man"-Oscar Wilde

    [This message has been edited by bandersnatch (edited 06-08-2000).]

    [This message has been edited by bandersnatch (edited 06-08-2000).]
  10. #270  
    Mr. Warman, in your second to last post, why in the world are you talking about yourself in the third person?!?

    As for appealing Mr. Warman's patent, Nhatman is in also.

    And if for anyone interested in buying screen protectors, Nhatman suggests that you try EasyPeel. Just as for a custom size but don't mention what you will be using it for. Problem solved.

    PS - Nhatman thinks that comment about V.S.Protective Shields (TM) being one letter away from being a contraceptive is funny! Nhatman is laughing.
  11. #271  
    Originally posted by Nhatman:
    Mr. Warman, in your second to last post, why in the world are you talking about yourself in the third person?!?

    i'm guessing he's quoting something...but he didn't reference the quote. hmmm....i won't go there.
  12. #272  
    Originally posted by Hoser_in_USA:
    i'm guessing he's quoting something...but he didn't reference the quote. hmmm....i won't go there.
    IT'S THE IMPOSTER!!
  13. #273  
    A wise old Canadian once told me, "Doug, don't argue with an *****, eh? He'll only bring you down to his level and then overwhelm you with his experience."

    Hey...do US patent laws hold true outside of the USA? There's a whole market up here just waiting to be screwed up the backside if that isn't the case...

    -InventorD, eh...
  14. #274  
    Originally posted by Doug:

    Hey...do US patent laws hold true outside of the USA? There's a whole market up here just waiting to be screwed up the backside if that isn't the case...
    Nope. Unless there's already a patent issued on "screen protectors" in Canada, you can make, distribute, and sell it all you want! (Mr. War-man, don't even try to stop sales of WR's on eBay placed by Canadian users on eBay Canada... it's completely legal to sell any of your "patented products" in Canada without paying your exorbitant royalties!)

    Only the US has such stupid, absurd patent laws where you can pretty much patent the way you take a dump. Such a broad patent would not be issued in Canada (and such patents as 1-Click Purchasing (or whatever it's called), and the like will never be issued in Canada).

    For information on patents in Canada, see http://<a href="http://strategis.ic....pt-e.html</a>. From reading the booklet on patents, you cannot patent an invention if it is obvious to those who have knowledge of the field you're going to patent the invention in. This is so obvious, it isn't even funny, therefore there would be no patent issued, especially using such a vague description. It would be patented, however, if he found a unique type of plastic/chemical to make the protector out of, in which case that plastic/chemical would be patented, not the use of it.

    I bet Mr. War-man thinks that the US controls every other country in the world, and that patents are valid worldwide. Only copyrights are valid worldwide, as defined by the Berne Convention.

    Rob Borek

    [This message has been edited by rborek (edited 06-08-2000).]
  15. #275  
    (whoops! messed up a posting, and couldn't delete it)

    [This message has been edited by rborek (edited 06-08-2000).]
  16. #276  
    The discussion is at the point where it is really necessary to have the expertise of an actual patent lawyer.

    My understanding is that most international patents are protected by other companies to varying degrees with obvious excepetions like China.

    As for Warman's comments about his right to protect his patent...he is right, he can do that legally. But he also can certainly be sued for harrasement regardless of his patent ownership. It is clear that his attacks on Easy Peal are unfounded, both morally and legally. Unfortunately, it takes a court of law to make that so.

    It's also quite apparent that it doesn't take a whole lot to actually refute his patent as Concept Kitchen clearly is not worried in the least about this person.

    As for repealing a patent, one would most likely need to contact that patent office to find out the proper procedure in doing so.

    I'm in if that happens!
  17. #277  
    Hello everyone.

    I have developed a new method/device for the protection of LCD screens and the like. It is completely transparent and is not visible under normal operating conditions. The invention consists of a proprietary gas phase substance that is employed simply by placing it between the screen and any foreign object. By making sure that the GASSP (GaseousPhase Anti Scratch Screen Protector) always remains between the LCD screen and any object that might potentially touch the screen, damage is easily avoided. The GASSP has the advantage over prior inventions that required the application of a plastic sheet to the screen surface in that it requires no adhesive, and can is thus not capable of harming the screen. In addition, it is crystal clear, and variable in thickness depending on the needs of the user. For example, a user could employ the GASSP at a desk by deciding to keep all objects 1 foot away from the screen at all times. Should the user fail to keep the GASSP between the screen and the foreign object however, scratches may result. The most common formulation for this screen protector consists of approximately 78% Nitrogen, 21% Oxygen, and additional constituents that I will not be revealing until the patent s filed. Note that since this will cover ALL gas phase devices and that since it is not possible to create a true vaccuum, any attempt to circumvent this invention by devising a extremely low density gas phase screen protector will be pursed legally. You have been warned.

    -Coyote
  18. #278  
    Heh.

    [This message has been edited by AlterEgo (edited 06-10-2000).]
  19. #279  
    I can't think of a single reason why I would want to protect my Visor's screen from water spots, salt spray whatever. I don't take my Visor fishing.

    I protect my screen by being careful about dust, etc. and keeping the screen clean. Kind of slippery though. My graffiti area has a nice, printed keyboard installed (Silkyboard) so I can't even see that part of my screen. Has a good feel when using a stylus.

    I wish I could install a replacement writing surface on the upper portion of my screen that wasn't so slippery. Be real nice to have a replacement writing surface that felt more like writing on paper. I'll skip the screen protection though. Not going fishing today.
  20. #280  
    Originally posted by homer:

    My understanding is that most international patents are protected by other companies to varying degrees with obvious excepetions like China.
    There is no such thing as an international patent. Patents are valid in the country of issue ONLY. Which is why companies that sell a product in say, the US, Canada, and the UK must apply for patents in each of those three countries to protect them.

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