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  1.    #1  
    This message is half a warning, and half me venting. I got an email purporting to be from Ebay saying I needed to clear up a billing problem and to click on a link in the email leading to an ebay site. The URL said http://www.ebay.com/..... The HTML used to construct the email directed the click to the real link, which is on some server with no domain name. As you can imagine, this is a scam. When you get to the page, you are asked for the following (not exhaustive): Name, Address, Phone, Birthdate, Mother's Maiden Name, Credit Card #, Exp. Date, Checking account number and routing number, Ebay username, Ebay password. The page uses graphics and links lifted directly from Ebay so to probably 99% of the people out there they would think it was an Ebay page.

    Of course if you fill this information in, you are ruining your life. Your life.

    The nerve of these people is really frustrating. I just wish people were a little less trusting and others were a little less evil.
  2.    #2  
    Here is the email. I'm not going to post the URL lest someone think it's real. If you really really want the email out of curiosity (or if you're an investigator) email me at KRamsauer@yahoo.com and clearly state that you know the email I am to forward you is a fraud and that it isn't my creation.

    Dear valued eBay member:
    It has come to our attention that your eBay billing updates are
    out of order. If you could please take 5-10 minutes out of your
    online experience and update your billing records you will not run
    into any future problems with the online service. However, failure
    to update your records will result in account termination. Please
    update your records by May 25th.


    Once you have updated your account records your eBay session will not be
    interrupted and will continue as normal. Failure to update will result in
    cancellation of service, Terms of Service (TOS) violations or future billing
    problems.

    To update your eBay records click here:
  3. #3  
    Yeah, Paypal (ironically now an eBay subsidiary) has a similar scam targetting its users. I'm sure eBay has a link to report such abuse (Paypal definitely does). The weird thing is that one of the Paypal scam emails I received was at an account that never had a Paypal account (as well as an account that does).
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  4.    #4  
    Originally posted by Toby
    Yeah, Paypal (ironically now an eBay subsidiary) has a similar scam targetting its users. I'm sure eBay has a link to report such abuse (Paypal definitely does). The weird thing is that one of the Paypal scam emails I received was at an account that never had a Paypal account (as well as an account that does).
    Yeah, I'm not sure I use this particular address for Ebay. I guess that makes sense, though, as Ebay will not give away it's member list. Of that doesn't mattter. As with all spam, sending out false positives (people who won't respond/people who don't have accounts) is basically free.
  5. #5  
    They've been doing this for awhile. As a seller on eBay (gee I'm a POWER seller!) we get targeted all the time. When it first started it was very primitive. It's gotten very sophisticated now. My wife actually fell for one of their ploys (keep in mind that she's busy homeschooling 3 boys, pregnant - 8 weeks away from delivery, and doing a lot of the listing for our eBay business) and I had to do an emergency switch of all our passwords, etc. Less than an hour after I switched all our passwords, etc. they tried to access our accounts.

    Ebay actually admits this stuff is going on now, for awhile I think they were hoping it would just go away.

    Main thing to remember is to NEVER go to a site for Paypal, eBay, Your bank, etc. from a link in an email. Don't even copy it from the email and paste it into your browser. If you can't access it from your regular way of going to the site, it's bogus.
    "I am a debtor both to Greeks and to Barbarians, both to the wise and to the foolish."
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by KRamsauer
    Yeah, I'm not sure I use this particular address for Ebay. I guess that makes sense, though, as Ebay will not give away it's member list. Of that doesn't mattter. As with all spam, sending out false positives (people who won't respond/people who don't have accounts) is basically free.
    they don't need to give away your address. It's very easy to get the email address of anyone who has ever bought or sold anything at eBay (or anywhere you have an address listed). Those damn 'bots are everywhere!
    "I am a debtor both to Greeks and to Barbarians, both to the wise and to the foolish."
  7.    #7  
    Originally posted by BobbyMike
    They've been doing this for awhile. As a seller on eBay (gee I'm a POWER seller!) we get targeted all the time. When it first started it was very primitive. It's gotten very sophisticated now. My wife actually fell for one of their ploys (keep in mind that she's busy homeschooling 3 boys, pregnant - 8 weeks away from delivery, and doing a lot of the listing for our eBay business) and I had to do an emergency switch of all our passwords, etc. Less than an hour after I switched all our passwords, etc. they tried to access our accounts.

    Ebay actually admits this stuff is going on now, for awhile I think they were hoping it would just go away.

    Main thing to remember is to NEVER go to a site for Paypal, eBay, Your bank, etc. from a link in an email. Don't even copy it from the email and paste it into your browser. If you can't access it from your regular way of going to the site, it's bogus.
    This was especially dangerous because they wanted bank account info as well. Not just Ebay info.
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by KRamsauer
    This was especially dangerous because they wanted bank account info as well. Not just Ebay info.
    Yeah, and they'll usually ask for a PIN under the assumption that most people recycle PINs and passwords.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  9.    #9  
    Originally posted by Toby

    Yeah, and they'll usually ask for a PIN under the assumption that most people recycle PINs and passwords.
    I hope someone targetted by that Spam takes action. Seems like a sting would be fairly easy to arrange. I forwarded the info onto Ebay. Hopefully something happens.

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