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  1.    #1  
    Hi all.

    FYI. See link.

    Take care,

    Jay

    September 17, 2011
    Call It Your Online Driverís License
    By NATASHA SINGER

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/18/bu...gewanted=print

    WHOíS afraid of Internet fraud?

    Consumers who still pay bills via snail mail. Hospitals leery of making treatment records available online to their patients. Some state motor vehicle registries that require car owners to appear in person ó or to mail back license plates ó in order to transfer vehicle ownership.

    But the White House is out to fight cyberphobia with an initiative intended to bolster confidence in e-commerce.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. groovy's Avatar
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    #2  
    So, instead of having to hack a user's single account, all the bad guys have to do is gain access to that user's online ID and they get access to all their accounts. That's a great idea! Oh, I forgot, biometrics can't be hacked. wink wink
  3.    #3  
    Hi all,

    No matter what security system the "experts" come up with there will always be someone or thing that will screw it up.

    Take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  4. #4  
    Glad to see companies resisting this - even government agencies
  5. #5  
    Sigh. Yet another example of a completely off-base headline. If you read the actual paper provided by the White House, you will see that this has absolutely nothing to do with creating a centralized identity verification system, a.k.a. an "online driver's license."

    http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/defa...egy_041511.pdf

    It's really just a bunch of hot air politico-speak about improving the communication infrastructure, setting standardized security policies, and providing government incentives to encourage the private sector to focus more resources on online security.

    Whoever at the NY Times wrote this article is completely and utterly off base with the headline, and should be fired. Not that I agree with the White House's published strategy--there's really nothing to agree or disagree with, since it's just a bunch of hot air. But getting people all riled up about a non-existent concept of an "online driver's license" is inflammatory and absurd. Probably the same person or people behind this article are responsible for the equally inflammatory and absurd reaction to RealID.
    Last edited by Syndil; 09/18/2011 at 08:53 PM.
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  6. groovy's Avatar
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    #6  
    I agree the article was misleading and sensational (surprise, surprise). But I think they, like many, are trying to read in between the lines of what concepts like the "interoperability" of "trustmarked attribute providers" will look like. Obviously, they envision that third-party online identity providers will provide these services to businesses and governments operating online. This will probably be dominated by a very small handful of corporations--probably just one or two--in partnership with the federal government (telecom redux). Will act as central repositories for all online transactions? Or will they merely be the pass-through and not retain any information. My guess is the former since there's more money in it.
  7. #7  
    That situation already exists. Symantec owns Verisign, and Verisign owns Thawte and also Geotrust. Those are the major players in online security right there, all under one roof. At one point each was a separate company, but now Symantec controls them all. The only competitor worth mentioning is Comodo.

    They don't act as central depositories for information, they simply provide and verify SSL certificates. This is from the paper:

    The enhancement of privacy and support of civil liberties is a guiding principle of the envisioned Identity Ecosystem The Identity Ecosystem will use privacy-enhancing technology and policies to inhibit the ability of service providers to link an individual’s transactions, thus ensuring that no one service provider can gain a complete picture of an individual’s life in cyberspace By default, only the minimum necessary information will be shared in a transaction.
    Like I said, the paper is more about setting standards and best practices, and most of it is hot air that will lead to nothing, I suspect.

    I encourage people to read the paper before attempting to form an opinion on it. A burden the NY Times reporter couldn't be bothered with, apparently.
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