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  1. #21  
    I think the eBay folk are divided into two very different camps.

    Some are selling it with starting bids of the firesale price, and quite a few here in Germany actually have a 1 starting bid. These people are cool, and if they sell for 350, that's cool in my book. Supply and demand.

    People who bought one or two TouchPads and are selling them with high starting bids are still OK.

    Then there's the people who apparently bought 100 units and are selling them with starting bids of /$ 200. These are the kinds of profiteering c..ts that will be the first against the wall when the revolution comes, and good riddance.

    Even if those people are despicable, I wonder why HP didn't instate a limit of, say, two TouchPads per order. They're exploiting the system, but HP could've easily closed the gap they were exploiting. That's kinda stupid, but we've kinda come to expect HP to act sort of haplessly...
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  2. Pronk's Avatar
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    #22  
    HP didn't instate a limit because they couldn't care less who buys them as long as they're sold. It's inventory clearance, and there's not even any benefit to keeping customers happy because they're leaving the market. In fact, these people who bought 100s are better customers (in HPs eyes) than people wanting to buy 1 or 2. And they're also taking a risk at buying stock and then selling it on with no guarantee the items will even sell.

    And this is the key point: they're STILL selling them on much more cheaply than the original price. So my original point remains true. You can still easily have a touchpad for less than half original price - there's plenty available. If you don't want to buy one, fair enough - but don't blame people for not selling them to you at the price you want to pay. So put it this way: if you're out in the desert and you're dying of thirst, are you going to accept the glass of water you're offered or walk away grumbling because the guy next to you got ice cubes and a straw in his?
  3. #23  
    Where do you get ice cubes in a desert?
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    #24  
    Battery-powered fridge?
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    #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by Pronk View Post
    HP didn't instate a limit because they couldn't care less who buys them as long as they're sold. It's inventory clearance, and there's not even any benefit to keeping customers happy because they're leaving the market. In fact, these people who bought 100s are better customers (in HPs eyes) than people wanting to buy 1 or 2. And they're also taking a risk at buying stock and then selling it on with no guarantee the items will even sell.

    And this is the key point: they're STILL selling them on much more cheaply than the original price. So my original point remains true. You can still easily have a touchpad for less than half original price - there's plenty available. If you don't want to buy one, fair enough - but don't blame people for not selling them to you at the price you want to pay. So put it this way: if you're out in the desert and you're dying of thirst, are you going to accept the glass of water you're offered or walk away grumbling because the guy next to you got ice cubes and a straw in his?

    The problem with the logic of 1 guy buying 100 vs selling 1 or 2. Is that there are 50-100 people who didn't get one who are willing to buy 1 or 2, which equates the same volume. Benefits of this vs 1 guy buying. Brand value, granted they MAY be getting out of the PC business, (based on recent news it seems it is just a possibility they are looking into), you get 50-100 people who like your brand rather than 1 who may or may not resell all of them at a higher price. Will those 50-100 still buy it from the reseller, possibly. But the brand likeability drops since they were forced to pay a higher price than others, because the company did not enforce some sort of fairness. That seems to be the issue. You seem to be comparing 1 guy buying 100 to 1 guy buying 1. But fail to realize there are 99 other people who have 0 because the 1 guy bought 100, and as a result the logic does not apply. If there is 1 guy who buys 100 and demand is only 50 people remaining, then yes HP is happier that the 1 guy buys 100, then selling to 50. But if there are 500 demanding the product, and 1 guy buys 100, well then u have 499 unhappy people rather than 400.
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    #26  
    My answer to that is still the same - the people buying them from someone who bought 100 and sold on still got a product at much less than full price. If the only appeal of a product to someone is if they can get it at the absolute lowest price possible, then brand likeability is utterly irrelevant - they clearly don't care what they get as long as they get it dirt cheap, and don't want it if they can't have that.

    Besides, surely brand likeability should come from whether they think it's a good product and value for money?

    If you want a touchpad, buy a touchpad - you can get them cheap. If you just want a 99 tablet, well you'll have to buy a cheap android one now. If you value having a webOS tablet the price has gone up, but it's still a lot less than it was originally. So make a value assessment - and if a webOS tablet isn't worth 200 to you, don't buy it. But don't make out you've been hard done by because you're only being offered 300 off the original price rather than 385.
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