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  1.    #1  
    Hi all

    FYI & it's about time! Please use the link to see the entire article.

    Take care,

    Jay

    Congresswoman wants carriers to come clean on 4G
    by Marguerite Reardon, June 22, 2011 10:44 AM PDT

    Congresswoman wants carriers to come clean on 4G | Signal Strength - CNET News

    Confused about which 4G wireless broadband service really is the fastest? U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-Calif.) wants wireless operators to disclose the true speeds of their self-proclaimed "4G" services.

    The congresswoman today introduced a billed called the "Next Generation Wireless Disclosure Act," which, if passed, would require carriers to inform consumers at the point of sale of the minimum data speeds, network reliability, and coverage of their advertised 4G services.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
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    #2  
    Yay! I can't wait to see who has the absolute fasted 4G service (in a four block radius in the center of a few major US cities, and absolutely squat everywhere else).

    I bet I can guess.
  3. #3  
    This bill will go nowhere. There is no such thing as a guaranteed minimum speed. Even if the carrier can guarantee a certain amount of bandwidth within their own network, they have no control over the rest of the Internet.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  4.    #4  
    Hi,

    Actually there is such a thing as truth in advertising...none of us are getting 4G speed... yet we are paying for it...frankly I rather they call it want it is a surcharge so they can speed up the conversion to 4G without them having to cough it up out of their own pockets.

    The industry has Bamboozled the public with all of this techno babble when it's be lying to all of us out of three side of their mouth at once.

    The industry have become this century's flimflam-snake oil sales people.

    take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  5. #5  
    if "truth in advertising" was enforced, they'd have to call it 3.5G
  6.    #6  
    Hi, LOL.

    Take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    Hi,

    Actually there is such a thing as truth in advertising...none of us are getting 4G speed...
    And what is "4G speed" exactly? The industry has already proven that they can make "4G" mean whatever it wants. AT&T and T-Mo are calling HSPA+ 4G, when in reality it is as just as Cantaffordit says, 3.5G.

    But the ITU-R changed the meaning of "4G" from "4th generation" to a list of speed requirements, so it doesn't really matter what generation a device is. If it has a radio in it capable of any of the technologies the ITU-R considers fast enough to be 4G, then it can be called a 4G device. But that doesn't mean the carrier has to provide 4G service to it.

    What is needed is a net neutrality law that does NOT inexplicably exempt wireless carriers. Nailing down what "4G" means and putting minimum speed requirements on it... You'd have better luck catching a greased pig.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  8.    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Syndil View Post
    And what is "4G speed" exactly? The industry has already proven that they can make "4G" mean whatever it wants. AT&T and T-Mo are calling HSPA+ 4G, when in reality it is as just as Cantaffordit says, 3.5G.

    But the ITU-R changed the meaning of "4G" from "4th generation" to a list of speed requirements, so it doesn't really matter what generation a device is. If it has a radio in it capable of any of the technologies the ITU-R considers fast enough to be 4G, then it can be called a 4G device. But that doesn't mean the carrier has to provide 4G service to it.

    What is needed is a net neutrality law that does NOT inexplicably exempt wireless carriers. Nailing down what "4G" means and putting minimum speed requirements on it... You'd have better luck catching a greased pig.
    Hi,

    I have to look and don't have time or energy to do so now. I posted an article about what the world wide standards for 4 G speeds and no one has reached that speed yet...I still say it is a slick advertising scheme with a lot of techno babble to confuse the public into paying. I'm surprised that a pro-consumer state such as NY has threatened the cell providers....I can't expect that to happen here in FL, as we are perhaps the least consumer friendly state out of all 50!

    Take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  9. #9  
    Like I said, the technology is capable of 4G speeds, and therefore the carriers sell them as 4G. That doesn't guarantee that you will actually see 4G speeds. Same thing happens with all network technologies. Remember 56k modems? Did anyone actually ever see 56k? No. 56k was the theoretical maximum. And even if conditions were ideal and you were able to connect a 56k pipeline between your computer and the ISP, there's still network latency, sun spots, QoS policies outside the ISP... an almost infinite number of variables that can affect the actual bandwidth to the end user. That is why no carrier can guarantee speed minimums.

    Consider this. If I were to run a web server from my house, I have a maximum upload bandwidth of ~300KBps. It doesn't matter how fast your own download connection is--whether it's 5MBps, 10MBps, 1GBps... you're never going to download anything from my web server faster than my 300KBps upstream connection. Like squeezing blood from a turnip. And you cannot hold your carrier responsible for my slow connection.

    I understand you're frustration, but the fact is this bill is simply barking up the wrong tree. Net neutrality is the answer, not bogging down in a never-ending war of words over what "4G" means.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  10. #10  
    I'm with Jay on this, US carriers are pulling a huge fast one and getting away with fudging on what 4G means. Japan knows what true 4G means. We do not have it here.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  11. #11  
    Japan is a member of the ITU, just like the US. Since the term "4G" is an ITU-R standard, it means the same thing in Japan as it does in the US.

    The Congresswoman that proposed this bill simply does not have a deep enough understanding of how cellular technology works in order to draft an effective bill. As I have already demonstrated, minimum guaranteed speeds are impossible.

    The biggest problem with her bill is that there is no such thing as a 4G data plan. You either have a 4G device or you don't. It does not affect the price of your data plan. So even if this bill does go through, it will have zero effect on the consumer, other than perhaps seeing less advertisements from carriers claiming 4G, so as to avoid the unnecessary red tape.

    What this Congresswoman really wants (as well as everyone that supports this bill) is net neutrality. She just doesn't know it.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  12.    #12  
    Hi all,

    I don't want to force them to give us 3 G service, I want them to state that we currently have about 3 1/3 G service and we are charging you $10 a month extra for service that you don't yet have an won't for awhile b/c we are too cheap to pay it and then charge you for it....

    take care,

    jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  13. #13  
    Ah, so we are talking about Sprint's $10 premium data fee. But it's not a 4G fee. Where does that put this bill?
    Touchscreens are a fad.

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