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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by grappler View Post
    According to this, they do Windows:

    1Password for Windows
    Thanks, I did not know 1password had a windows version.
  2. #22  
    I also prefer to use password algorithms. I've never used LastPass, because I don't really like the idea of storing my passwords in "the cloud," although I don't have any evidence that it's not secure. I prefer Pwdhash from Stanford's Crypto Lab. It's completely open source and there's a Firefox plug-in that makes it really easy to use. All you have to do is remember a single password and the plug-in generates unique, secure, site-dependent passwords.

    The only problem with PwdHash is that you come to rely on the plug-in and you never know what your actual password is... just the password you use to generate it. That makes it hard to log in from sites where you don't have the plug-in installed (like your phone or someone else's computer). To get past that you can either go to http://www.pwdhash.com, generate it, and copy-and-paste it, or use my WebOS app (PwdHash) to do it for you. (See link in my sig... It's a free app, so this doesn't count as an advertisement. )
    "The service on my iPhone is so bad I'm thinking of calling it my AOL phone." -- Jim Gaffigan

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    #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by Maturin View Post
    I'm a fan of password algorithms. Basically something relating to the site you are trying to access, and a personalized code or method to mix it with. That way, you can have different passwords for every site while never having to store them or look them up.

    This is what I do. I don't like the idea of storing my passwords in a program or plug-in, because that leaves me unable to log in from other devices.

    I also use a simple cipher for all of my security question answers. I'm not sure why I bother, because all of my answers are fake. However, I think that it's worth it to use a cipher or fake answer because accounts are frequently broken into via security questions (Sarah Palin's Yahoo account, for example).

    Quote Originally Posted by wotan View Post
    My details were compromised in the attack and I've received a lot of emails from various sites that basically just say someone has been trying to login. Luckily, my password that I had used isn't one that is used for anything important so I'm not concerned, but Amazon, LinkedIn, eBay, paypal and a few others have all requested that I change my password just the same. I think it's good looking out by those companies.
    My login was also compromised. I only got emails from LinkedIn and Amazon. It's good that they were looking out for their users, but I already had different passwords for everything. At least they let me use the same one that I had before; I would have been mad if I had to come up with a new system.
    "Visits? Well that would indicate visitors."
    "Future events such as these will affect you in the future."
  4. #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by monkeydog View Post
    I also prefer to use password algorithms. I've never used LastPass, because I don't really like the idea of storing my passwords in "the cloud," although I don't have any evidence that it's not secure. I prefer Pwdhash from Stanford's Crypto Lab. It's completely open source and there's a Firefox plug-in that makes it really easy to use. All you have to do is remember a single password and the plug-in generates unique, secure, site-dependent passwords.

    The only problem with PwdHash is that you come to rely on the plug-in and you never know what your actual password is... just the password you use to generate it. That makes it hard to log in from sites where you don't have the plug-in installed (like your phone or someone else's computer). To get past that you can either go to http://www.pwdhash.com, generate it, and copy-and-paste it, or use my WebOS app (PwdHash) to do it for you. (See link in my sig... It's a free app, so this doesn't count as an advertisement. )
    The only reason I suggested this is because my professor suggested it to us in class and said it's the best thing out there. So I'll believe him since he has a lot of experience with security and the like.
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  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by monkeydog View Post
    The only problem with PwdHash is that you come to rely on the plug-in and you never know what your actual password is... just the password you use to generate it.
    What do you do if you want to have multiple userID's and want to track those also? Is there a way to have multiple "passwords" or some other data associated with each site?
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by Unclevanya View Post
    What do you do if you want to have multiple userID's and want to track those also? Is there a way to have multiple "passwords" or some other data associated with each site?
    You should use a different master password for each user, that would generate unique site passwords.
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