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  1.    #1  


    On to a more serious topic in our (OT) forums.


    Hiv is one of the many diseases that affect thousands of people today. Many people don't take this disease seriously - unless sadly being diagnose of having it. I thought this would be a very interesting toipic to have some discussion on.



    In the United States, over 600,000 reported cases of AIDS have been recorded since 1981 and it is believed that 900,000 Americans may be infected with HIV. Although development time varies from individual to individual, since 1992 scientists have estimated that roughly half
    of the people living with HIV will develop AIDS
    within 10 years of becoming infected. AIDS is
    growing most rapidly among minority
    populations, as well as women and injection
    drug users. According to the U.S. Centers for
    Disease Control and Prevention, the prevalence
    of AIDS is six times higher in African-Americans
    and three times higher among Hispanics than
    among whites.

    {I would love to hear your thoughts on this life-threatening disease}.
    Last edited by RUSH; 11/24/2010 at 10:12 AM.
  2. #2  
    The only "nice" thing about HIV is that it is not like the black plague where you could catch it from someone easily.

    Funny story, when I was younger and in elementary school is when AIDS started showing up in the news and all that. I remember them preaching the ways in which you can get it, doing drugs and making whoopee. Some time past and then someone said that AIDS came from monkeys. I don't know how old I was, but remember busting out laughing cause my conclusion was that people were making whoopee with monkeys, cause they obviously were not sharing needles.

    I was quickly corrected in that they were eating the monkeys, not making whoopee with them.
  3.    #3  
    Quote...
    I was quickly corrected in that they were eating the monkeys, not making whoopee with them. Quote ends..
    Lol, to say that many others was under the same impression.

    Many people try to avoid conversations about "HIV" as long as it doesn't affect them. If more people was aware of how you could be infected with the Hiv virus, and how to go about protecting/preventing this from happening to you, then there would be less infected people today.

    We need to open up our eyes around us, and realize that HIV is real - and it's up to us to protect ourself from it.
  4. #4  
    I think people look at it differently because they see it so much in poorer countries and don't think that it is as big of a deal here. Although that might technically be true (statistically speaking), it is still quite a serious disease.


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  5. angiest's Avatar
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    #5  
    At the risk of sounding callous to those suffering from this (and other) diseases, HIV is, for the most part, behaviourally spread. (There are obvious exceptions, in the early days of HIV haemophiliacs suffered greatly). But some of us deal with other conditions (genetic), for which there are no real treatments for the underlying condition, and which, in many ways, are more devastating. And they do not have near the high profile of HIV. It is quite fashionable to wear the red ribbon of HIV awareness, not so much to wear the purple ribbon of cystic fibrosis (as a very personal for instance).

    People may not wish to discuss it, but is there, at least in the West, a shortage of awareness about AIDS? Or Breast Cancer? Or any of a number of other high profile conditions with a lot of funding for research? With timely treatment using antiretrovirals, someone with AIDS today stands a good chance of living a normal life and dying from something other than complication due to AIDS.

    My youngest daughter (soon to be 5) has cystic fibrosis. Her life expectancy is somewhere near 40 years. This means that I stand a reasonable chance of outliving her. But most people who do not themselves or have family or close friends with this condition know next to nothing about it. We have no large hospitals dedicated to its eventual cure. Radio stations do not do fundraisers for us. NFL players do not don purple gear to raise awareness about this, the most common lethal genetic condition in the US...
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by angiest View Post
    At the risk of sounding callous to those suffering from this (and other) diseases, HIV is, for the most part, behaviourally spread. (There are obvious exceptions, in the early days of HIV haemophiliacs suffered greatly). But some of us deal with other conditions (genetic), for which there are no real treatments for the underlying condition, and which, in many ways, are more devastating. And they do not have near the high profile of HIV. It is quite fashionable to wear the red ribbon of HIV awareness, not so much to wear the purple ribbon of cystic fibrosis (as a very personal for instance).

    People may not wish to discuss it, but is there, at least in the West, a shortage of awareness about AIDS? Or Breast Cancer? Or any of a number of other high profile conditions with a lot of funding for research? With timely treatment using antiretrovirals, someone with AIDS today stands a good chance of living a normal life and dying from something other than complication due to AIDS.

    My youngest daughter (soon to be 5) has cystic fibrosis. Her life expectancy is somewhere near 40 years. This means that I stand a reasonable chance of outliving her. But most people who do not themselves or have family or close friends with this condition know next to nothing about it. We have no large hospitals dedicated to its eventual cure. Radio stations do not do fundraisers for us. NFL players do not don purple gear to raise awareness about this, the most common lethal genetic condition in the US...
    I find it unfortunate that your daughter has that awful disease. And I will definitely keep here in my prayers.

    I know you warned about potentially sounding callous, but I don't think 'behavioural' diseases are somehow less/more deserving of attention. As far as AIDS goes, yes it has tons of research funding, and life extending treatments, but look at the communities most affected. Can they afford it? Do they have access to it? What about those who didn't get it through risky behavior? I see nothing wrong with openning the discussion to include genetic illness, but attention shouldn't be taken away from other conditions simply because of the means by which they are contracted or the amount of funding there has been for research.

    also the conversation about an epidemic isn't just about treatment, cures, and survival... it's about stopping the spread.
  7. angiest's Avatar
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    #7  
    I wasn't stating that one was more or less deserving of attention. I was stating that certain conditions (not limited, by any stretch of the imagination, to AIDS) have no shortage of awareness. Every May Cystic Fibrosis Awareness Month passes with no-one knowing about it. I'm pretty sure early sufferers of AIDS had the same thoughts as I express now (I was a kid when AIDS first really came to light). We (and others who deal with low-profile or orphan conditions) still have to struggle to make people aware that we are out there.
  8. groovy's Avatar
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    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    I know you warned about potentially sounding callous, but I don't think 'behavioural' diseases are somehow less/more deserving of attention. As far as AIDS goes, yes it has tons of research funding, and life extending treatments, but look at the communities most affected. Can they afford it? Do they have access to it? What about those who didn't get it through risky behavior? I see nothing wrong with openning the discussion to include genetic illness, but attention shouldn't be taken away from other conditions simply because of the means by which they are contracted or the amount of funding there has been for research.
    With all due respect, isn't that what happened with HIV? Ask yourself why there haven't been many ribbons or candlelight vigils to bring attention to the millions who die every year of malaria. Not only is it deadlier but also easier and cheaper to treat than HIV. But there are no actors, singers, journalists, or any other rich Westerners dying of malaria so nobody cares. Now, that's been changing in recent years for the better but history still shows an overwhelming outpouring for one disease to the neglect of others.

    I don't want to sound callous either but while record amounts of cash were being pumped into AIDS research last year, 250 million people contracted malaria and somewhere between 1 and 3 million people died from it.
    Last edited by groovy; 11/24/2010 at 05:40 PM.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by groovy View Post
    With all due respect, isn't that what happened with HIV? Ask yourself why there haven't been ribbons or candlelight vigils to bring attention to the millions who die every year of malaria. Not only is it deadlier but also easier and cheaper to treat than HIV. But there are no actors, singers, journalists, or any other rich Westerners dying of malaria so nobody cares.

    I don't want to sound callous either but while record amounts of cash were being pumped into AIDS research last year, 250 million people contracted malaria and somewhere between 1 and 3 million people died from it.
    right. And I have nothing against sheding light on other illnesses, as I said before. I was just rubbed the wrong way when he noted that HIV was a behavioral disease. I interpreted that to mean that behavioral diseases deserve less attention. After reading his second post I no longer believe that is the case.
  10. #10  
    We can point out a number of diseases that are not behavioral, especially Cancer, which, in my opinion is deadlier than HIV/AIDS as it is genetic and can be diagnosed even if one has lived a "healthy" lifestyle....but Rush's topic is on the prevention on the spread of HIV/AIDS. To stay on this topic, I feel that the spread can be prevented if we as a people become more aware of the disease. Aware as in being educated on how to not contract the illness by not living a risky lifestyle and take heed to all the warning signs that are being thrown out there.

    Maybe we as a people should start voicing an opinion on the issue of population control.....but that's another topic.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by angiest View Post
    But some of us deal with other conditions (genetic), for which there are no real treatments for the underlying condition, and which, in many ways, are more devastating. And they do not have near the high profile of HIV. It is quite fashionable to wear the red ribbon of HIV awareness, not so much to wear the purple ribbon of cystic fibrosis (as a very personal for instance).
    The reason: HIV/AIDS prevalence in United States: ~1.2 million. CF prevalence in the US: 30,000 (aka ~2.5% of HIV pts). HIV/AIDS is also seen as more preventable because of behavioral modifications. Despite the low prevalence of CF, it does remain the most common lethal inherited disease in the Caucasian population, and so I agree, it does deserve more awareness. AIDS and breast CA organizations seem to be able to pump a lot more money into publicity though, which I can't really say is right or wrong. Diabetes, hypertension, cigarette and alcohol use are all problems for example that are far more prevalent and predispose patients to serious consequences with higher frequency. However, despite the lack of public call to awareness regarding CF, active research is being undertaken to improve the outlook of pts with this condition. A quick pubmed search showed 160 published CF studies within the past month, alone. Hopefully continued research will be able to lead to advancements that will significantly improve the prognosis of your daughter.
    Last edited by stung; 11/24/2010 at 07:53 PM. Reason: fixed the stats
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by angiest View Post
    At the risk of sounding callous to those suffering from this (and other) diseases, HIV is, for the most part, behaviourally spread. (There are obvious exceptions, in the early days of HIV haemophiliacs suffered greatly). But some of us deal with other conditions (genetic), for which there are no real treatments for the underlying condition, and which, in many ways, are more devastating. And they do not have near the high profile of HIV. It is quite fashionable to wear the red ribbon of HIV awareness, not so much to wear the purple ribbon of cystic fibrosis (as a very personal for instance).

    People may not wish to discuss it, but is there, at least in the West, a shortage of awareness about AIDS? Or Breast Cancer? Or any of a number of other high profile conditions with a lot of funding for research? With timely treatment using antiretrovirals, someone with AIDS today stands a good chance of living a normal life and dying from something other than complication due to AIDS.

    My youngest daughter (soon to be 5) has cystic fibrosis. Her life expectancy is somewhere near 40 years. This means that I stand a reasonable chance of outliving her. But most people who do not themselves or have family or close friends with this condition know next to nothing about it. We have no large hospitals dedicated to its eventual cure. Radio stations do not do fundraisers for us. NFL players do not don purple gear to raise awareness about this, the most common lethal genetic condition in the US...

    Unfortunately, there is not enough time and resources, and nobody here is trying to say that one is more important than the other. This is purely about debating this specific topic. I have been struggling with several types of cancer for about 3 years now, and in no way would I say that my sickness takes precedence over other diseases. We all hope that there will eventually be more awareness about all life-threatening illnesses. Here's to hoping.

    P.S. - Although the NFL doesn't put purple ribbons on their jerseys, they do have charity events donate all their registration fees for their youth programs (NFL Flag Football and Youth Development Leagues) to The Boomer Esiason Foundation, which deals with finding a cure for cystic fibrosis. I hope that is some sort of consolation to you.


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