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  1.    #1  
    Okay, I have just pulled the last clump of hair out my head. Not really, but home networking is driving me to drink. Quite simply put, I have no idea how to do it. I have followed what seems like five hundred different sets of directions at this point. I am trying to share an internet connection between a desktop running windows me and a laptop running windows xp. The desktop is already connected to the internet via a dsl modem. I have installed two nic (?) cards on the desktop and have purchased a router. My vaio laptop has an integrated ethernet jack. Does anyone have any advice how to set this up? Thanks in advance.
  2. #2  
    Originally posted by ovaltine
    Okay, I have just pulled the last clump of hair out my head. Not really, but home networking is driving me to drink. Quite simply put, I have no idea how to do it. I have followed what seems like five hundred different sets of directions at this point. I am trying to share an internet connection between a desktop running windows me and a laptop running windows xp. The desktop is already connected to the internet via a dsl modem. I have installed two nic (?) cards on the desktop and have purchased a router. My vaio laptop has an integrated ethernet jack. Does anyone have any advice how to set this up? Thanks in advance.
    Does the router say on the box that it is made for sharing an internet connection? If it does, that's great. If it doesn't, you can still do it with Windows ME internet sharing. The former is the best method by far, though.
  3. #3  
    Originally posted by ovaltine
    Okay, I have just pulled the last clump of hair out my head. Not really, but home networking is driving me to drink. Quite simply put, I have no idea how to do it.
    I feel your pain. Been through the same swamp.


    I have followed what seems like five hundred different sets of directions at this point.
    These sites were helpful to me:

    http://www.homepcnetwork.com/

    http://www.practicallynetworked.com/


    I am trying to share an internet connection between a desktop running windows me and a laptop running windows xp. The desktop is already connected to the internet via a dsl modem. I have installed two nic (?) cards on the desktop and have purchased a router. My vaio laptop has an integrated ethernet jack.
    You do not need two nic cards on the desktop. Only one to connect to the router. The router will connect to the dsl modem and the laptop.

    I would strongly suggest upgrading the desktop to XP Pro. Windows ME just doesn't make it as an "internet server".
    The cost of the upgrade is worth the lesser aggravation.


    Does anyone have any advice how to set this up? Thanks in advance.
    I had a laptop and desktop both running Win98SE networked via Intel anypoint phoneline hardware. Laptop used the parallel port interface.
    Worked great! Internet access speed on the laptop was great!

    Got a new P4 Dell desktop with XP Pro. The Intel hardware was scrapped as it did not play well with XP.
    Upgraded laptop to XP home. Found it ran better than 98SE.
    Upgraded network to Netgear phoneline PCI on desktop and USB on laptop. Worked great!!!!

    EXCEPT......I deleted the default Guest account on the desktop after the network was up and running. Laptop refused to connect to desktop. Found out via collegue at work that the Guest account is required for networking. Go figure! Anyway, had to make a registry entry of ForcedGuest=1 (do a registry search, can't remember the location.).

    Then the network was fat and happy.

    Bottom line is:

    Networking XP to XP is a lot easier than XP to Win98, 2000, ME.

    However, the Network Wizard ISN'T. When it works, everything is OK, when it doesn't, it gives you zero advice on what is wrong.

    Don't get me started on how most error messages are about as useful as a teat on a bull!!!!!!

    I wish you good luck. If you are successful, consider yourself a network engineer by trial and error.
  4.    #4  
    Thanks for the tips. The router is a siemens 4-port dsl/cable router with a built-in print server (we have another laptop that I was hoping to add). I was going to upgrade the desktop to windows xp, but it is a piece of .... and the time and effort to upgrade might be better spent paying someone to come and set up this miniscule network That said, I am still going to try and do it myself. I will stop just short of throwing the components all over the computer room After all, I can wear a hat to cover the bald spots on my head.
    Seriously, thanks again for the links and advice. I will be trying again this evening.
  5. #5  
    Felipe
    On the road to 5,000 posts
    Life is what happens between Firmware releases.
  6. #6  
    You do not need two nic cards on the desktop. Only one to connect to the router. The router will connect to the dsl modem and the laptop. I would strongly suggest upgrading the desktop to XP Pro. Windows ME just doesn't make it as an "internet server".
    The cost of the upgrade is worth the lesser aggravation.
    Your two comments are inconsistent. If he's going to use the router, he'll have no internet server. Now XP is better in so many ways, but don't get it to share the internet connection.

    Back to the problem, though. You need to tell us what kind of router it is. Is it made for sharing internet connections (DSL and Cable) or is it just a hub that is used in LANs?
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by ovaltine
    Thanks for the tips. The router is a siemens 4-port dsl/cable router with a built-in print server (we have another laptop that I was hoping to add). I was going to upgrade the desktop to windows xp, but it is a piece of .... and the time and effort to upgrade might be better spent paying someone to come and set up this miniscule network That said, I am still going to try and do it myself. I will stop just short of throwing the components all over the computer room After all, I can wear a hat to cover the bald spots on my head.
    Seriously, thanks again for the links and advice. I will be trying again this evening.
    What is the connection you make to the DSL service? Is it PPPoE or DHCP? One of them you have to type in your username and password (PPPoE) in order to recieve your network identification and connect to DSL. The other assigns you that information based on simply the fact that you are connected to them. Let us know.
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by KRamsauer

    Your two comments are inconsistent. If he's going to use the router, he'll have no internet server. Now XP is better in so many ways, but don't get it to share the internet connection.
    ......
    Good catch. Thanks for the correction. I was thinking in terms of two machines connected with one connected directly to the cable/dsl modem.

    That is one advantage of a router. If the server PC connected to the cable/dsl modem is down, the rest of the net is down also.
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by BudPritchard


    Good catch. Thanks for the correction. I was thinking in terms of two machines connected with one connected directly to the cable/dsl modem.

    That is one advantage of a router. If the server PC connected to the cable/dsl modem is down, the rest of the net is down also.
    Yeah, we have a router the takes care of all the PPPoE for us, and we can plug in adn remove computers at will. It's great. It's the same thing huge corporations have but it's in our rinky-dink apartment.
  10.    #10  
    It is a PPPoE connection. Also, the box states that it is a dsl/cable router so I assumed it wasn't just a hub. Thanks.
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by ovaltine
    It is a PPPoE connection. Also, the box states that it is a dsl/cable router so I assumed it wasn't just a hub. Thanks.
    Okay, you'll need to log into the router through a web interface. Mine is http://198.168.0.1 Yours might be different. When you are in there, you can set the username and password. The router then makes the connection to your DSL provider. To the DSL provider, it looks like a computer. Really cool. You need to consult your manual for the exact details. You know how to hook up the hardware, right?
  12.    #12  
    Yup, I know how to hook up the hardware. I'm not really sure what you mean about logging in to the router. There is something about that in the directions that came with the router, but I will confess I don't understand exactly what to do. I know these are probably elementary questions, I just have no idea. Thanks for any/ all help, I have already learned a bunch from all of the posts and links.
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by ovaltine
    Yup, I know how to hook up the hardware. I'm not really sure what you mean about logging in to the router. There is something about that in the directions that came with the router, but I will confess I don't understand exactly what to do. I know these are probably elementary questions, I just have no idea. Thanks for any/ all help, I have already learned a bunch from all of the posts and links.
    My bet is that you're going to open up your web browser, and go to some IP address. The router will respond, you will log in, and enter the login info. What do the instructions say exactly?
  14. #14  
    ouch!
    HooT! HooT!

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