View Poll Results: Under what circumstances would you give your 11-15 year old a cell phone

Voters
48. You may not vote on this poll
  • To carry, while they are out, but it comes back to me or goes in a special place, when at home

    10 20.83%
  • It is for emergencies only, not to be tethered to their friends

    7 14.58%
  • They will NOT be allowed to text, tweet, email and the like.

    3 6.25%
  • They can carry/use it whenever/however they want, it's their phone.

    23 47.92%
  • I don't believe in cell phones for under work/driving age kids

    9 18.75%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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  1. #21  
    I can't really vote in the poll since I don't have kids, but I think that given today's standards, it would be OK for a teenager to have a phone to use for limited situations.

    I would like to mention something tho - it was brought up on a radio station about how an 11 yr old was SEXTING! How in the world would an 11 yr old know what to say?!?!?! Such a scary world it's turning into...
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by pelikan3 View Post
    I was you when I was your age. I worked for everything of value that I owned, and understood that there were certain things that you didn't get until you reached a certain age or maturity level (often when you could afford to do it for yourself).

    I respect your perspective more because you speak for people of your age and younger, even more than I do that of the more conservative parents chiming in (though I appreciate you all as well).

    I also appreciate your speaking up because, we are in the minority now, as most folks don't see the cell phone as any big deal to just hand out, when it really is a big responsibility and right of passage, and always should be.

    Here here!
    Why thank you .

    I do see a problem with teenagers having cellphones/smartphones tho. These days it is all about who has better anything. So what does this result in? Teenagers spending there money or there parents money on doing multiple purchases of smartphones through out the course of a year. For example, a friend of mine has gone through about 5 phones this year (E71->bold 9000->pearl flip->milestone->iphone4) and now he plans on getting a windows phone 7 device. Hmmm, some might say it would be nice to have a new device every couple months. Whats the downside? He currently has $30 CAD to his name. That's it that's all. He relys on his parents to be the back support for him at this time which is shouldn't be necassary.

    Getting tweens and teens into cellphones/smartphones too early will result in things like this. So IMHO, i think the only way to determine if the person is ready is if they can show that they have matured enough to hold this responsiblity and that there parents will not be there to deal with there cellphone/smartphone fee issues.
  3. #23  
    As a matter of fact, I'm planning on becoming a history teacher and I plan to encourage them to use their smart phones, laptops, Palmpads in my class. I'm smart enough and up with the times enough to know that there are an unlimited number of ways those devices can help the students with their homework and learning. If they're learning and their grades are up, I don't care what else they do with them. If the texting in class becomes a problem, I'll tell them to stop.

    Every generation has something that kids do in class that distracts them. Like talking, eating, sleeping, reading, drawing. You can't stop them from being kids. You just have to give them a chance to do the right thing and to be mature enough to do what they need to do. It's not fair to just assume they won't.

    Every generation too has new technology slowly being worked into the fold and old fashioned teachers who refuse to embrace it. It my generation it was computers. Now computers are a staple of every classroom. This will be the same.

    There are in fact schools that are already using and encouraging it in the classroom. I just saw an article on it today in fact. I'll share it later.
  4. AbdielRN's Avatar
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    #24  
    If I had a son/daughter, noo picture mail thats for sure :\
  5. Olidie's Avatar
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    #25  
    it's there phone, they can call, text, or use it how ever they choose. Just no sexting or it's mine and I mean for good.
  6.    #26  
    I wish more folks saw it this way.

    But, I also like the approach of the teacher integrating the technology into class. A sure-fire way to prevent something from being a toy is to make it something you need for work.

    Quote Originally Posted by Krab19 View Post
    Why thank you .

    I do see a problem with teenagers having cellphones/smartphones tho. These days it is all about who has better anything. So what does this result in? Teenagers spending there money or there parents money on doing multiple purchases of smartphones through out the course of a year. For example, a friend of mine has gone through about 5 phones this year (E71->bold 9000->pearl flip->milestone->iphone4) and now he plans on getting a windows phone 7 device. Hmmm, some might say it would be nice to have a new device every couple months. Whats the downside? He currently has $30 CAD to his name. That's it that's all. He relys on his parents to be the back support for him at this time which is shouldn't be necassary.

    Getting tweens and teens into cellphones/smartphones too early will result in things like this. So IMHO, i think the only way to determine if the person is ready is if they can show that they have matured enough to hold this responsiblity and that there parents will not be there to deal with there cellphone/smartphone fee issues.
    "If you can't view and manage multiple apps, via multiple open windows, side-by-side, it's not multi-tasking, PERIOD." - Me
  7. #27  
    I don't have kids, but I have a younger niece whose in that age group and has had a cell phone for a year or two and their have been numerous occasions where she has misused it.

    A word of advice to you parents, or people with younger kids in your family, don't be so naive about your kids behavior. Think about when you where younger, and how you probably abused any type of freedom's you where given. If they can get away with doing something, they will. If they have a cell phone, chances are high they will be exposed to sexting, weather they initiate it or not (there will always be some fresh kid in their group of friends).

    Weather it's smartphone, cellphone, FB, AIM, or whatever; some kids may need to be more closely monitored than others; just don't be naive about what you think your kids are doing with all this technology.

    Talk to them, educate them, and monitor them. They're not adults, they're minors; they are heavily influenced by peer pressure, "social norms" & raging hormones and technology just amplifies all these things. Don't assume anything, be clear and blunt with them about what you expect from them. Hopefully technology hasn't put up a big enough barrier between you & your young kids/siblings/family members that they don't feel close enough to you, don't open up to you about any issues they face, most of which you may not even be aware of.

    Technology has it's pro's and cons, and if left unchecked, kids will definitely exploit the cons.
  8.    #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by olidie View Post
    it's there phone, they can call, text, or use it how ever they choose. Just no sexting or it's mine and I mean for good.
    You know... this wasn't a direction I wanted to take this thread in when I started it. BUT, since it IS here...

    We want our children to understand that such behavior is not acceptable, I agree. But, it's NOT unforgivable either. Nor is the aftermath insurmountable.

    My personal convictions, judgments and biases, regardless of their basis (religious, cultural, or secular), will never be as important to me as the continued health and welfare of my children.

    In March 2009, Jessica Logan, age 18, committed suicide over taunting she received due to nude photos she had sent to her boyfriend, which he passed around when they broke up. This, and other more recent teen suicides prompted by cyber-bullying, and internet "outing" is a terrible reminder of how fragile our kids can be at their core, when faced with what feels like an insurmountable problem.

    We can tell our kids "no sexting" or we will take away your phone. And this is a VERY good plan. But, we also have to be prepared to do some potentially very involved and supportive damage control if they make a mistake. Jessica Logan's mom only knew bits and pieces of what had happened, but never thought it would go down the path that it did.
    "If you can't view and manage multiple apps, via multiple open windows, side-by-side, it's not multi-tasking, PERIOD." - Me
  9. #29  
    I like the parents and/or schools that have this policy: upon arrival at school, turn phones off and place in locker; when school is out for the day, get from locker and turn on. Phones, whether smart or dumb, are not needed in class. One poster talked about research, etc within his class, and of course there can always be projects that can be used. But, last time I checked most schools have computers all over, or at least in labs. I don't know about you, but I don't do any in-depth research on a smartphone.

    It's amazing, but VM, SMS, Email will all be there waiting when the day is over.

    Emergency during the school day? Last time I checked, all schools have listed land lines - I have my kid's school number and teacher's number in my Pre.

    Our kids are under 10, but our friends' with teenagers have a good policy that they can look at their phone at anytime to look at history. (yeah, not gonna catch all, but what parent can? Mine sure didn't! thank god they didn't have GPS on my car! =P)
    I see pandas.
  10. #30  
    I like the 'no sexting' rule as if most parents would ever know... Parents are easily fooled.
  11. djmcgee's Avatar
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    #31  
    Pelikan3, I agree with much of what you say in principal but there are always exceptions.

    I agree that parents should set the standard and casual cell phone use should not be available during school hours. Phones should be off.

    However, the schools that my children (15 and 13) have after-school programs where it was explicitly stated to parents that cell-phones for kids is nearly essential. The school is locked after a certain time and two of the three buildings don't have a public phone. It was similarly stated that teachers are not responsible for contacting parents for kids.

    Many of these teachers have been sitting at school for extended periods waiting on parents so I understand.

    I just ask that you realize that not every school district is the same as yours and general comments about phones "not needed" may not apply.

    Certainly when I was a kid I didn't have a cell phone - they weren't invented yet. And I walked to/from school many times (3+ miles). I don't think I would want my kids to do that today and their school complex is 8 miles away.

    In all that, I still agree that no phones during class time is a responsible position for the school, child and parent.

    In regards to phone use, both my kids have unrestricted use but I always have the option to review usage with them, same as the computer, game systems, etc. Trust with occasional checkup is important, you don't want to find out until too late that a bad decision is brewing ... The most important thing is to be honest with your children, don't be deceptive with them or they will with you.
    Dan
  12. Micael's Avatar
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    #32  
    This is a parenting issue.
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  13. TheMacs's Avatar
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    #33  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    This is a parenting issue.
    Here, here!

    But Pelikan3 did ask in the Poll and OP under what conditions would you give your kid(s) a cell phone...

    Ultimately, it seems to be a very individual decision.

    Glad opinions are strong (any which way); makes me think we care. And that we're willing to discuss with some tolerance.
  14. #34  
    I will let my child have a phone around 11 years old. It helps (1) to check on them (2) they can contact me for help (3) to be socially empowered.

    You have to set boundaries and monitor all of their technology (phones, computers, everything) from when they are young. The parent is responsible for setting expectations (no texting/calls in class) restrictions (No MMS, overnight blackout times) if the child is not being mature enough.

    PalmOS: Zire71, Clie NX70V, LifeDrive, T|X
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  15. #35  
    I think in another thread here i related this, my step son received an Iphone (ewwwwwwww) from his father, while staying with us, (in one weekend) he ran up a 600 bill. Talking to his Girl friend back home. This is fine and dandy, however, his father called me up and asked if I thought I should pay for half of the bill? WELLLLLLLLLLLLLL.. my reply was this, XXXX did you bother to ask me if I thought it was a good idea to blow 300 bucks buying a phone for a 14 year old???? No was the reply, Welll then you have my answer.. Now the kid has a pay as you go phone, which he must pay for. When he visits us, we give him another pay as you go phone so he has no long distance to call us. The step daughter also has a pay as you go. .which she hardly ever uses.. go figure.
    Life is short, Play hard, and enjoy every moment as if it was your last.
  16. #36  
    [quote=pelikan3;2704284]
    The problem is that they ARE doing it IN class. And parents are using it as a means to contact them, IN class. Not between classes. IN class.

    So tell them to stop texting and put the phone away. That's all you need to do. You don't have to be so extreme as to confiscate them. No need to punish everyone for what a few people do.

    Like I said before, this is just another example of an old fashioned teacher refusing to accept new technology and new ways of doing things, using the same line that has been used for generations: 'I got along just fine without them when I was a kid.'

    To those people I always say that at one time people got along just fine with a horse and buggy too. Does that mean we never should've embraced the automobile?

    Saying that it isn't necessary because it didn't exist before it's absolute nonsense. Saying it isn't necessary therefore it should never be considered as an improvement is just ignorant and close minded.

    But there's no real reason to debate it. Every teacher has their own methods and has to do things the way they see fit. If anyone has a problem with the way a teacher does things, they will let him or her know. So I say do what you feel is right but loosen up a little bit, respect the students' personal property, and give them a chance to earn your trust before you take something away from them because you assume they'll do something bad with it. That's insulting to them and will make them resent you.
  17. #37  
    Quote Originally Posted by Krab19 View Post
    Why thank you .

    I do see a problem with teenagers having cellphones/smartphones tho. These days it is all about who has better anything. So what does this result in? Teenagers spending there money or there parents money on doing multiple purchases of smartphones through out the course of a year.

    These days? When in the history of civilized man has it ever NOT been about who has a better anything?

    It will always be that way no matter what the technology is. You can't change that. Instead of wasting energy trying to change human nature and obsessing over little trivial problems like a cell phone, spend that energy on teaching kids something useful.

    Let them be kids. You can teach them they are no better than anyone who has lesser things, but it's not going to do any good. They're going to think that way no matter what you do.

    And btw, it really isn't any of your business how much of their money or their parents' money they spend on anything. If their parents want to buy them nice things and they can afford it, what's the harm? If the kids want to spend their money on it, that's a good thing because it means that they saw something they wanted and they worked to earn it. That's what life is all about.

    Lighten up people. Kids like smart phones just as much as you and they can be just as responsible with it as you can. And guess what, adults can be just as irresponsible with it as kids can be.
  18. #38  
    At my son's school in MD, they can carry their phones with them.If they have a smart phone, some teachers will even have them use them to look up information in class. There are also times they are given free time and can use them to text friends and such.

    However, if they use them when they aren't allowed, they lose the privilege.

    My son is very responsible with his.
    Sent from my favorite gadget!
  19. #39  
    Quote Originally Posted by verwon View Post
    At my son's school in MD, they can carry their phones with them.If they have a smart phone, some teachers will even have them use them to look up information in class. There are also times they are given free time and can use them to text friends and such.

    However, if they use them when they aren't allowed, they lose the privilege.

    My son is very responsible with his.
    your too young to have a child that old.. lol
    Life is short, Play hard, and enjoy every moment as if it was your last.
  20. #40  
    I don't have any kids. Infact i'm 21 and just graduated college, and landed a great job. Believe it or not, I think the cellphone I got in 8th grade helped me to get where I am today.

    This may sound silly (infact i'm grinning ear to ear as I write this), but I really think it's true. The world is rapidly changing, and kids as younger than 13 are understanding the importance of 'staying connected'. Are there dangers involved? Ofcourse there are! but trial-error, exeperience, and good parenting are the best teachers IMO. I truly feel that not exposing kids to reality at a young age hurts them later on. Now cellphones are a part of that reality. They need to truly understand the power and implications of misusing these devices, and they can't do that from a distance.

    Boy did I make mistakes with my phone when I was younger. Texting during class, having the ringer go off in class, a few innopropriate conversations, etc. I learned from my mistakes and moved on. Now i'm at a job where, i've got my phone and my labtop out in the middle of meetings, conducting business, while at the same time, retaining the information that is being presented. Some of the older guys are amazed by my ability to multitask, and it truly ups my value when I can handle so much at one time.

    Luckily for me, i'm at a job where the older generation is affirmatively trying to understand and incorporate 'youth culture' and technology into their business. I honestly think we should be trying to do the same thing in education. Lets be honest, if I didn't have my phone to text, I would have been doodling, or whispering a joke. The truth is, my peers and I had an increased capacity for retaining info from multiple source and we were bored with the recycling our state funded teachers were spewing. But what if technology was incorporated in class? What if we could text our answers to our teacher, so that the 'teachers pet' was no longer the only one who got called on. What if we LEARNED how to use them as a resource instead of just a distraction. Like it or not the mobile phone is the dictionary/encyclopedia/textbook of today. It's time parents, school systems and businesses of today realize that. I keep hearing these 'well, back in my day' arguments, but this is a new day. We have got to adapt.

    a little note on using phones to cheat: if all kid is asked to do is produce the right answer, the test was a failure anyway. They should also be able to show their reasoning (which is more important that being able to regurgitate). Many tests should be open book. the real world is more often about being able to find the answer, or show comprehension of and ability to apply a theory, not memorization. Likewise, vocabulary tests should be a verbal conversation, not a simple replication of webster's words. If a student can text his/her way to an A+, it was the school system who 'cheated' them out of an effective education
    Last edited by Mhunterjr; 10/16/2010 at 07:32 AM.
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