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  1.    #1  
    Yes, the economy is tough.
    I have watched my friends loose their jobs in the mfg industries.
    People are working harder, longer hours, and for less money.

    However...........

    I was spending some time with my grandma, looking at some old family photos, and noticed in a lot of the pictures grandpa was missing.
    I asked grandma why grandpa wasn't in a lot of the photos; she said it was because he was probably wherever they were picking crops - if they were picking corn, he was wherever they were picking corn. If they were loading hay, he was wherever they were loading hay.
    The families were a lot closer then.
    Maybe one family would have a car, and all the other relatives would coordinate their trip to town to go shopping, and pile into the one car.

    This would of been the late 30's.
    They didn't have vacation play.
    They didn't get sick pay.
    They didn't collect unemployment.
  2. #2  
    Even though people were struggling in those days, it seems that life was more rewarding. Things have changed a lot.
    "Patience, use the force, think." Obi-Wan


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  3.    #3  
    Because they knew what really were the important things in life.

    Like getting the latest cool gadget.
    Just call me Berd.
  4. Micael's Avatar
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    #4  
    You old fart's remenissin agin? ltm ltm ltm
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  5. #5  
    Hahaha Who you calling old?
    "Patience, use the force, think." Obi-Wan


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  6. #6  
    I'm not old until i'm 20yrs older than whatever my age is at any time.
  7. #7  
    I think that assessment depends on what area you were living in. If you're comparing rural areas to rural areas then yes the things that people have gained in rural areas is pretty big. If you're talking about cities it's a lot less significant.

    Of course using the 30's is a bad example. I believe people had more in the 20's then they had in the 30's.
  8. #8  
    As time progresses... life has a tendency by some accounts to feel less fulfilling... why? Because we are engaged less and less in the act of survival, and more and more on pointless acts that have less significance on our existence. For instance, in the 30's, automation wasnt very prevalent in rural america, so they needed the extra manpower to get the job done. Lots of people grew their own food too, because the supply chain wasnt anywhere near as robust. Imagine getting a ripe banana any time of the year of in Michigan. The necessary things of those times arent so necessary now. We spend long hours pumping away at work, and feel less connected to the results we achieve... this is particularly true in "cubicle" jobs and the like, where the results of our long hours are never honestly discernable.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by berdinkerdickle View Post
    Yes, the economy is tough.
    I have watched my friends loose their jobs in the mfg industries.
    People are working harder, longer hours, and for less money.

    However...........

    I was spending some time with my grandma, looking at some old family photos, and noticed in a lot of the pictures grandpa was missing.
    I asked grandma why grandpa wasn't in a lot of the photos; she said it was because he was probably wherever they were picking crops - if they were picking corn, he was wherever they were picking corn. If they were loading hay, he was wherever they were loading hay.
    The families were a lot closer then.
    Maybe one family would have a car, and all the other relatives would coordinate their trip to town to go shopping, and pile into the one car.

    This would of been the late 30's.
    They didn't have vacation play.
    They didn't get sick pay.
    They didn't collect unemployment.
    Life expectancy for children born in 1930: 59
    Today: 72
    Percent of elderly with hospital insurance in 1930: around 25%
    Percent of elderly with hospital insurance today: 98%

    As far as poverty, it makes a huge difference whether you're talking about 1935 or 1939. About 80% of the elderly were in poverty in 1935; this improved to around 65% in 1939.
    Today: somewhere between 9 and 12% depending on how you define it.

    The good old days were only good if you had a lot of money and were very healthy, and very young.

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