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  1. tirk's Avatar
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       #1  
    Why is it that if you apparently have a good night's sleep you seem more tired than usual the next morning?

    Is it something to do with sleep patterns (your alarm/kids/cat/whatever happens to wake you from deep sleep, so you think you had a good night's sleep)? Or perhaps that a good night's sleep comes from being more tired than usual, so you are still more tired the next day?

    (Yes, I'm tired and grumpy this morning! )
    PalmPilot Professional...Palm Vx...Treo 600...Treo 680...HTC Touch HD...iPhone 4S...
  2. groovy's Avatar
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    #2  
    If you get substantially more that 8 hours of sleep you probably will be tired. Also, if your sleep is light or interrupted, you'll probably be tired. If you drink alcohol before bed, have the TV or lights on, sleep in a noisy environment, you'll probably get less than restful sleep. Or, perhaps you have sleep apnea. In which case, the more sleep you get, the more tired you may be.
  3. #3  
    I always wake up with headaches on weekends, because i have to force myself to sleep past sunrise. Any sleep more than 5 hours defintely makes me feel worse.

    Before i got "happily" married, i would goto sleep as soon as i got home from work, wake up around midnight, goto a couple of clubs, eat breakfast after the clubs close (4am in NYC), and then go straight to work.

    PERFECT schedule.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by tirk View Post
    Why is it that if you apparently have a good night's sleep you seem more tired than usual the next morning?

    Is it something to do with sleep patterns (your alarm/kids/cat/whatever happens to wake you from deep sleep, so you think you had a good night's sleep)? Or perhaps that a good night's sleep comes from being more tired than usual, so you are still more tired the next day?

    (Yes, I'm tired and grumpy this morning! )
    Hi,

    Do you have ongoing pain in the shoulders and neck????

    If this is an ongoing issue, you should go to the Dr. you may have Chronic Fatigue syndrome or Fibromyalgia......more than likely the first and not the latter....

    Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  5. tirk's Avatar
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       #5  
    I'm less grumpy now

    I'm sure I don't have a "problem" with sleeping, it's just that occasionally (once a month or less?) I notice I'm particularly tired in the mornings, and it seems to correlate with getting more sleep (say 8 hours rather than my normal 7).

    Quote Originally Posted by groovy View Post
    If you .... sleep in a noisy environment
    I live under the flightpath to London Heathrow, my house backs on to a railway line, and fronts on to a fairly busy street... I can sleep at a Rammstein concert!!
    PalmPilot Professional...Palm Vx...Treo 600...Treo 680...HTC Touch HD...iPhone 4S...
  6. #6  
    I have a problem where I feel really tired whenever I get the recommended 8 and 1/2 hours of sleep.

    However I feel alive and well on the weekend at 12-14 hours.

    Though I almost suspect it's the waking before 12PM which causes me trouble rather than the short period of sleep.
  7. #7  
    If your tired after 8hrs of sleep then that's likely when the aliens do their "thing" to you. I hear the probing racket will tucker you out right quick.
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  8. #8  
    if you vary the time you wake up by more than 1 hour, it has the same effect on your brain as "jet lag", so sleeping in on a day off will make you groggy/crabby.

    Also, using a snooze button for a few cycles will also create the issue because it keeps you from getting back to REM sleep by causing the cycle to restart every time you hit the button.

    ya gotta love science!
  9. Micael's Avatar
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    #9  
    Very likely, it's sleep apnea. I have it bad. When I went to go get tested, I doubted I had it. It turns out that I'm the poster child for it.

    Once I was diagnosed and treated I stopped falling asleep at random moments..... like while driving.
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  10. Slow_S10's Avatar
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    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    Very likely, it's sleep apnea. I have it bad. When I went to go get tested, I doubted I had it. It turns out that I'm the poster child for it.

    Once I was diagnosed and treated I stopped falling asleep at random moments..... like while driving.
    Hmmm my doctor suggested that I get tested for this also but I have been putting it off like forever because I really didn't think that I could possibly have this problem but seeing your comment really makes me wonder...
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  11. #11  
    As I discovered, the hard way, high blood pressure can also do this. Blood pressure can raise when you lay down, then will later drop, as your body relaxed. You may not even realize you have it, but it can severely disrupt sleep patterns. You may think you were asleep for all those house, but really were restless and waking up and may not even remember.

    I suffered terrible insomnia for a long time and never knew!
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  12. Slow_S10's Avatar
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    #12  
    Wow that's very interesting. I didn't know about the high blood pressure thing. I used to have normal to fairly low blood pressure... then I had a Kid... and got a new job... and now my Wife's pregnant... lol. The last time i saw my doctor he said that my blood pressure was good but boarderline. He was the one who reccomended the test for sleep apnea but now I am kind of suprised he didn't mention that high blood pressure could be causing my sleep (or lack there of) problems.
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  13. groovy's Avatar
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    #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteboy182 View Post
    Wow that's very interesting. I didn't know about the high blood pressure thing. I used to have normal to fairly low blood pressure... then I had a Kid... and got a new job... and now my Wife's pregnant... lol. The last time i saw my doctor he said that my blood pressure was good but boarderline. He was the one who reccomended the test for sleep apnea but now I am kind of suprised he didn't mention that high blood pressure could be causing my sleep (or lack there of) problems.
    Actually, apnea also contributes to high blood pressure. So, just because you may or may not have one don't necessarily rule out the other. Since you're married, it might be pretty easy to tell. Just ask your wife if it seems like you sometimes stop breathing at night.
  14. #14  
    Not everyone experiences such symptoms from high blood pressure and, of course, it is also easy to attribute them to something else, as I did.

    I had no idea how high mine was going, now, the closer it gets to normal, the better I sleep.

    It's kind of an ironic thing, as groovy mentioned, because other conditions can contribute to high BP and vice/versa. Insomnia can make BP levels raise, too.

    The doctor and I were discussing all of this stuff, before I left the hospital last Saturday. The only problem they ran into with me is that sleeping pills don't work, so they can't try to use them to improve my sleep patterns.
    Sent from my favorite gadget!
  15. #15  
    every body is different... some need some exercise. Some just need rest...

    Every other month i have to work a few midnight shifts... and i have to say there is no doubt it has taken a few days off the end of my life. with a lack of sleep by body is more likely to get sick, throw out my lower back, and just be "tired" for a week straight.. Though i haven't exercised in a year... i know i need to. Also for a day after a midnight shift my brain can't remember simple things, and i constantly make simple mistakes. (Put cereal in Fridge).

    Every person is different. but a one day sleep in.... may be good for you but when you do get up go do something active.
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by groovy View Post
    If you get substantially more that 8 hours of sleep you probably will be tired. Also, if your sleep is light or interrupted, you'll probably be tired. If you drink alcohol before bed, have the TV or lights on, sleep in a noisy environment, you'll probably get less than restful sleep. Or, perhaps you have sleep apnea. In which case, the more sleep you get, the more tired you may be.
    Groovy and Micael are right; you should consider this diagnosis. Usually, not only are you tired in the morning, but you may fall asleep during the day. Headaches and high blood pressure are also very common. And although it's commonest among people who are significantly overweight, about 20% of people with it are not. Do you sleep with someone who can report if you snore or not? If so, how significant is it? A snort or two, or roof-rattling? And of course the obvious: do you stop breathing while asleep? How frequently does this happen? If it's once a month, it's probably not worth working up because the risk is minimal.
  17. #17  
    thank goodness we can all get this treated because of obamacare!
  18. Slow_S10's Avatar
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    #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by davidra View Post
    Groovy and Micael are right; you should consider this diagnosis. Usually, not only are you tired in the morning, but you may fall asleep during the day. Headaches and high blood pressure are also very common. And although it's commonest among people who are significantly overweight, about 20% of people with it are not. Do you sleep with someone who can report if you snore or not? If so, how significant is it? A snort or two, or roof-rattling? And of course the obvious: do you stop breathing while asleep? How frequently does this happen? If it's once a month, it's probably not worth working up because the risk is minimal.
    I wake up tired every morning... and my wife always complains about my snoring not to mention I have not had more than 8 (average 6.5~7) hours of sleep in years. I do sometimes get extremely drowsy during the day but it is not possible for me to actually fall asleep as I stay constantly busy.

    I'm happy to say I am not overweight... in any serious way at least (5'11" 190 some what muscular build) so at least that's one good sign. In any case I think I am definitely going to make an appointment with my doctor sometime in the near future to actually get tested.
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  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by Workerb33 View Post
    thank goodness we can all get this treated because of obamacare!
    I realize you feel that people should not get it treated if they lack health insurance, but not surprisingly, I think you're wrong.
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteboy182 View Post
    I wake up tired every morning... and my wife always complains about my snoring not to mention I have not had more than 8 (average 6.5~7) hours of sleep in years. I do sometimes get extremely drowsy during the day but it is not possible for me to actually fall asleep as I stay constantly busy.

    I'm happy to say I am not overweight... in any serious way at least (5'11" 190 some what muscular build) so at least that's one good sign. In any case I think I am definitely going to make an appointment with my doctor sometime in the near future to actually get tested.
    The problem in sleep apnea is that regardless of the amount of time you are asleep, your constant periods of apnea prevent you from getting REM sleep, which is what provides you more complete restful sleep. People who are asleep actually are getting REM sleep only about 25% of the time they are asleep, so only slight changes that disrupt that amount can significantly affect how you feel the next day.
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