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  1.    #1  
    Hi,

    I don't think Dell is going to walk away from 3Par. At least not yet!

    Take care,

    Jay

    Dell May Up 3PAR Bid: Report
    By REUTERS, August 24, 2010, Filed at 7:46 a.m. ET

    http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2010/...gewanted=print

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Dell Inc is preparing to sweeten its bid for 3PAR Inc after its earlier bid was topped by rival Hewlett-Packard Co's $1.6 billion bid for the data storage company, according to a report on Bloomberg's website.

    The report, which cited one person familiar with the matter, said Dell may send the offer within days.

    A representative for Dell was not immediately available for comment.

    HP's offer of $24 a share on Monday was 33 percent above Dell's $18-a-share bid and sent 3PAR's shares up 45 percent, above $26 and more than $2 above the HP bid as investors anticipated the bidding could go higher still.

    (Reporting by Yinka Adegoke; Editing by Gary Hill)
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  2.    #2  
    HI all,

    here is more info:

    Take care,

    Jay

    H.P.’s Bidding War With Dell Underscores the Demand for Data Storage
    By ASHLEE VANCE

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/24/te...gewanted=print

    SAN FRANCISCO — Data storage used to be one of the more mundane corners of the technology industry. Now it is where an increasing number of tech companies — and Wall Street — want to be.

    On Monday, Hewlett-Packard, the world’s largest technology company, started a bidding war against its rival Dell for the rights to 3Par, an 11-year-old storage company based in Fremont, Calif.

    H.P.’s bid of $1.6 billion, or $24 a share, is 33 percent higher than what Dell offered last week, $18 a share. It is also 149 percent higher than where 3Par was trading before the Dell offer.

    “You see deals go in vogue, and we are clearly seeing that now,” said A. M. Sacconaghi Jr., an analyst with the research firm Sanford C. Bernstein & Company.

    Companies need a place to store vast amounts of data: video clips, e-mail, reports and presentations. They also need tools to help them search, shrink, shuffle and otherwise manage it. The makers of those tools, like 3Par, have turned into some of the hottest properties in Silicon Valley.

    Last year, EMC, the largest storage company worldwide, trumped its main competitor NetApp to buy Data Domain for $2.3 billion. The lofty price was the result of two months of haggling that added $800 million to Data Domain’s value. The deal was the largest purchase of a technology company backed by venture capital last year.

    Storage companies like 3Par and Data Domain are becoming attractive because they come to the rescue of large corporations at a desperate time. The amount of data stored continues to double about every 18 months, said Deni Connor, the principal analyst at Storage Strategies Now.

    Keeping track of all that information across hundreds or thousands of computing systems has proved a nightmare, as has working with the data in a speedy fashion.

    “The amount of storage needed by these companies is getting out of control,” Ms. Connor said.

    Storage experts foresaw this problem years ago and set to work refining techniques for compressing information, eliminating duplicate files and spreading huge amounts of data across cheap computers in practical ways. Data Domain and 3Par, which both went public in 2007, were part of a wave of storage companies that sought to profit from their mastery of new data manipulation techniques.

    David Scott, a former H.P. executive and now chief executive at 3Par, spent nine years shepherding 3Par and has ended up as the belle of the ball. The company manages complex data sets across a large corporate network and reduces the number of hardware systems a company must buy. Large companies already buying this technology may find the pitch more attractive with H.P. or Dell’s name behind it.

    “They buy these companies and then put them through their huge distribution channels,” Mr. Sacconaghi said. “They have really been able to expand sales, and the formula is a reasonably proven one.”

    With gross margins above 60 percent, 3Par would provide a boost to those of both H.P., at 23 percent, and Dell, at 18 percent.

    Storage companies tend to create tight links between software and hardware, which allows them to sell bundles rather than a stand-alone product to customers and to innovate at a quick clip, said Garth Gibson, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon University. These trends, along with the importance of data, have helped storage systems outflank computer servers in importance.

    “The computers are just providing cycles and have become rather inexpensive,” Mr. Gibson said. “Your data, on the other hand, is really the primary asset in an organization.”

    Dell and H.P. have experience adding storage wares to their arsenal. Dell acquired EqualLogic for $1.4 billion in 2007, and H.P. bought LeftHand Networks, a company with similar storage technology, for $360 million a year later.

    Dell, in particular, has emphasized the importance of storage as the company tries to rework its business away from mere hardware sales. The hope is that storage software sales will provide Dell with higher profits, while also opening a more meaningful relationship with customers that centers on their information.

    For its part, H.P. last year hired Dave Donatelli, who worked for 22 years at EMC, as its head of corporate hardware, signaling a desire to expand its storage business.

    Analysts have pointed to companies like Compellent, CommVault and Isilon Systems as possible beneficiaries of the storage acquisition wave. Shares of all three companies were up more than 10 percent on Monday on the back of H.P.’s bid for 3Par.
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  3.    #3  
    Hi all,

    Here is some updated info!

    Take care,

    Jay


    Dell to Challenge HP With New 3PAR Bid: Source
    By REUTERS, August 25, 2010, Filed at 3:42 p.m. ET

    http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2010/...gewanted=print

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Dell Inc is planning a stronger bid for data storage firm 3PAR Inc, challenging Hewlett-Packard Co's offer of $24 per share, a source familiar with the talks said on Wednesday.

    The source said Dell's new bid was likely to be more "competitive" than HP's last offer of $1.6 billion, but did not say how much higher the new bid would be.

    A Dell spokesman declined to comment on the negotiations.

    A Reuters survey of nine fund managers and analysts on Tuesday found most expect another bid or two and a final price of about $29 per share.

    The pursuit of 3PAR comes as HP and Dell, as well as other large technology vendors such as International Business Machines Corp and Cisco Systems Inc, vie to sell a wider array of products and services and invest in new technology.

    3PAR specializes in high-end data storage, a key part of "cloud computing" -- an increasingly popular technology that enables computer users to access data and software over the Internet, allowing companies to save costs.

    Some analysts, however, have said HP's latest bid is too high and Dell might walk away. 3PAR shares were down around 0.2 percent at $26.99, although they briefly rose to $27.49 after Reuters reported Dell's plans for a new bid.

    3PAR said on Tuesday it will start merger talks with HP after HP's offer topped Dell's previous $1.15 billion bid.

    If 3PAR's board endorses HP's bid, it would give Dell three business days to sweeten its offer. 3PAR said in a filing on Tuesday it had not yet made such a decision.

    Bidding wars are rare in the tightly knit technology sector, where deals are often made behind closed doors.

    In the last notable bidding war in the tech industry, EMC outbid NetApp last year to buy Data Domain for $2.4 billion. Data Domain was advised in that deal by Frank Quattrone, the same veteran technology banker who is advising 3PAR in the latest negotiations.

    Credit Suisse Group AG is advising Dell and JPMorgan Chase & Co advises HP.

    Dell shares rose 1.8 percent to $11.79, while those of HP were up one penny at $38.40 in late afternoon trading.

    (Reporting by Ritsuko Ando; editing by Gerald E. McCormick, Robert MacMillan and Andre Grenon)
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  4.    #4  
    Hi all,

    Who knows what will happen, as from what I read overnight Dell may still be in play!

    Take care,


    Jay

    3PAR Entertains HP's Offer, Begins Merger Talks
    By JEREMY KIRK of IDG News Service\London Bureau, IDGAugust 25, 2010

    http://www.nytimes.com/external/idg/...gewanted=print

    3PAR will open discussions with Hewlett-Packard following that company's unsolicited $1.6 billion cash bid for the data storage maker, which exceeded an earlier bid from Dell.

    3PAR plans to share non-public information with HP, according to a filing on Tuesday with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Dell, which bid $1.15 billion for 3PAR on Aug. 16, has been informed of the talks and will have three days to make a counteroffer if 3PAR endorses HP's bid.

    HP sent its offer in a letter to 3PAR, forcing that company board to reconsider its merger agreement with Dell, which it continues to endorse. However, 3PAR's board may consider HP's offer a "superior proposal," putting pressure on Dell to increase its bid or lose out to HP.

    HP has said that 3PAR's technologies will help it expand its offerings for building public and private cloud services. Many enterprises are using cloud services, where computing and data storage are done in remote data centers.

    Dell also has its eye on that market and recently announced it would buy server provisioning vendor Scalent and storage optimization provider Ocarina Networks.

    3PAR sells InServ storage servers in addition to its InForm Operating System with tools required to managed different storage configurations.

    Send news tips and comments to jeremy_kirk@idg.com


    Copyright 2010 IDG. All Rights Reserved.
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  5.    #5  
    3Par Goes With Dell, Snubbing Hewlett-Packard - NYTimes.comHi all,

    Here is the latest on 3Par..soap operas see less plot twists!

    Take care,

    Jay


    3Par Goes With Dell, Snubbing Hewlett-Packard
    August 26, 2010, 8:45 am



    Dell said Thursday that the data storage company 3Par had accepted its revised offer of $24.30 per share in cash, a bid that values the company at $1.6 billion, net of the target company’s cash.

    Dell’s initial agreement to buy 3Par for $18 per share was upset when Hewlett-Packard stormed in with a higher bid this week. 3Par said Wednesday that it was in talks with H-P over the higher offer.

    “Dell and 3Par have signed an amendment to the agreement reflecting the new offer price,” the company said.

    “Storage is at the forefront of this strategy,” said Dave Johnson, a senior vice president for strategy at Dell. “With the 3Par acquisition, Dell with have the broadest set of differentiated storage solutions in the market today.”
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  6.    #6  
    Updated info:

    http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2010...gewanted=print

    Dell Says 3Par Accepts Its Hiked $1.52B Buyout Bid
    By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS, August 26, 2010, Filed at 9:16 a.m. ET

    SEATTLE (AP) -- Dell Inc. said Thursday that data storage maker 3Par Inc. has accepted its raised buyout bid of $1.52 billion, after the computer maker topped an offer from rival Hewlett-Packard Co.

    HP and Dell, among the world's largest personal computer makers, are looking at 3Par as a way to build up their ''cloud computing'' businesses, delivering software, data storage and other services to customers over the Internet. The companies want 3Par to help keep data storage costs down because the company has technology that doles out storage space on the fly.

    Dell's new offer is $24.30 a share in cash, up from its $18-per-share offer, or about $1.13 billion, on Aug. 16.

    Rival HP countered with an offer of about $1.5 billion on Monday, or about $24 per share.

    Dell, which is based in Round Rock, Texas, said it expects the deal to add to earnings by fiscal 2012.

    The deal is expected to close before the end of the year, subject to government approvals and other closing conditions.

    In pre-market trading, shares in 3Par fell 29 cents, or 1.1 percent, to $26.47. Dell shares rose 17 cents, or 1.4 percent, to $11.95, and HP shares gained 24 cents, or 0.6 percent, to $38.48.
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  7. #7  
    Be sure to keep related topics together. If you have an update to the story, it would be best to post it in your original thread as those who may be following you will find your updates quicker.
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  8. #8  
    HP Ups The Ante For 3PAR; Offers $1.8B In Cash For Data Storage Company

    This morning, we saw Dell’s announcement that 3PAR had accepted its increased offer to acquire the storage company for $24.30 per share in cash, or approximately $1.6 billion, net of 3PAR’s cash. Now HP just upped the ante, offering $1.8 billion for 3PAR, or $27 per share in cash.

    Clearly these companies want 3PAR. Bad. Dell had previously signed an agreement to acquire 3PAR for $18 per share, with a provision for matching competing bids. HP subsequently outbid Dell for the data storage company, offering $24 per share in cash, or also roughly $1.6 billion at the time. But Dell and 3PAR signed an amendment to the agreement reflecting the new offer price, which brought its bid up to par with HP’s offer.

    3PAR provides a virtualized utility storage platform that enables customers to significant drive down cloud computing infrastructure, storage and associated management costs.

    HP’s Dave Donatelli says in a release: “Our revised proposal offers superior value to 3PAR’s shareholders, while maintaining our disciplined approach to only pursuing acquisitions that we believe will strengthen our portfolio and create long-term value for our shareholders…Not only is our offer superior to Dell’s proposal, HP remains uniquely positioned to execute on this combination given the number of synergies between the two companies.”

    It should be interesting to see if Dell continues the bidding war. HP could have just made an offer that 3PAR can’t refuse. Or Dell could propose $2 billion for the company and we’ll revisit this again.
  9. #9  
    ...in cash! And I thought my ballz were big.
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  10.    #10  
    If HP has so much money to throw around I would like some! Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  11.    #11  
    Hi all,

    This story is like the energizer bunny...it keeps going & going & going....................

    Take care,

    Jay


    Dell Raises 3PAR Offer to Match HP Bid
    By REUTERS, August 27, 2010, Filed at 7:15 a.m. ET

    http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2010/...gewanted=print

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Dell Inc dealt the latest blow in a bidding war over data storage company 3PAR Inc on Friday, sweetening its bid to $1.8 billion to match a rival offer from Hewlett-Packard Co.

    Dell said 3PAR had accepted its new bid $27 per share bid, which is up 10 percent from its last offer.

    The new Dell deal comes as HP launched a tender offer on Friday to buy all outstanding shares of 3PAR for $27 per share in cash, according to a newspaper advertisement.

    The pursuit of 3PAR comes as HP and Dell, as well as other large technology vendors from International Business Machines Corp to Cisco Systems Inc, are trying to expand into new business areas.

    (Reporting by Paritosh Bansal; Editing by Derek Caney)
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  12.    #12  
    HI all,

    There is some interesting background on the 3PAR biddibg.

    Take care, Jay

    What’s Next in the Battle for 3Par?
    August 27, 2010, 10:00 am

    What's Next in the Battle for 3Par? - NYTimes.com

    How high can the bidding war between Dell and Hewlett-Packard for 3Par, an 11-year-old storage company, go?

    The ante has now been raised five times since Dell opened the public bidding on Aug. 13.

    On Friday, the bids came fast and furious. First, Dell raised its bid by 10 percent, to $27 a share, matching Hewlett’s offer of Thursday. Several hours later, Hewlett-Packard decided to scrap the game of bidding up by pennies and went big: an offer of $30 a share, or an 11 percent increase from the last bids. Will Dell match?

    The price for 3Par is now more than eight times its annual revenue of $240 million, a company, which Bloomberg News notes, has “lost money every year since going public in 2007.” That seems very rich for a stock that had been trading around $10 for most of the year.

    A survey of nine fund managers and analysts by Reuters on Tuesday found that most were expecting a final price of around $29 a share. That has now been topped and shareholders are expecting more: in early trading on Friday, 3Par shares are surging more than 21 percent, to $31.50.

    Both companies can go higher, if they are willing to try to justify such sky-high valuations to their shareholders. The Financial Times’ Lex column on Friday said that, “Justifying Dell’s last offer already assumed insane amounts of growth, and actual profit generation.” According to Lex, 3Par would have to increase its annual revenue sixfold, to $1.2 billion by 2015 in order for Dell to generate a respectable return.

    Still, if Dell or Hewlett are willing, there is a way. In terms of sheer firepower, Hewlett has the edge in a bidding contest, with a much bigger market capitalization and nearly $15 billion in cash available, compared with some $13 billion at Dell.

    Yet as the Deal Professor described on DealBook on Thursday, Dell has an advantage in being first. Under the terms of its acquisition agreement with 3Par, Dell can match a rival bid with three business days.

    The agreement with Dell also has a termination fee of $72 million. The Deal Professor notes:

    It works out to about 30 cents a share. This means that H.P. will have to lower the amount of any increased bid it may be considering by this amount, as this would be money that is ultimately coming out of its pocket.

    And Dell arguably has a greater strategic appetite to win 3Par. John Hempton of the Bronte Capital blog on Sunday had a strong argument for Dell’s strategy (hat tip to Silicon Alley Insider):

    Dell is approaching the enterprise cloud product in a purposeful and seemingly effective way. Sure mostly they are doing it via acquisitions — see the latest purchase of 3Par. 3Par make integrated hardware–software solutions for storage in enterprise clouds — in other words sophisticated jbods. And this is after a few other acquisitions in that area.

    And surprisingly it is working. Dell server growth was rapid even as their beige-box business continued to falter. As they stated “storage and server revenue increased 35 percent with rapid growth in blades”. They talk about integrated solutions to enterprise cloud – presumably so relatively unsophisticated IT guys can install it.

    Hewlett Packard is also getting its growth in blades – but – frankly – not at anything like this rate. Partly they are incumbent – but mostly I think they are just ceding share to a company – that at least on that area has its eyes firmly focused on the prize.
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  13.    #13  
    hi all,

    Take care,

    Jay

    HP Raises 3PAR Offer to $2 Billion, Trumps Dell Bid
    By REUTERS, August 27, 2010, Filed at 11:38 a.m. ET

    http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2010/...gewanted=print

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Hewlett-Packard Co raised its offer for 3PAR Inc to $2 billion, once again topping Dell Inc's bid and showing it had plenty of ammunition in the bidding war for the data storage company.

    HP's offer of $30 per share came less than 3 hours after Dell announced 3PAR had accepted its bid of $27 per share, which matched HP's previous offer.

    Dell's agreement with 3PAR allows it to match competing bids, but analysts say HP may be the stronger player with $115 billion in annual revenue compared with Dell's $53 billion. HP's bids have also been bolder, while Dell has mostly moved to match its rival.

    "It's strategically important to both companies. but given the bidding behavior, I feel like HP's in this to win it," said Dinesh Moorjani, analyst at Gleacher & Co.

    3PAR shares surged 20.5 percent to $31.36 in early trade, indicating investors expect another bid may emerge. The bidding war has raised 3PAR's valuations to what some analysts see as unreasonable levels.

    The shares had mostly traded at around $10 this year, until Dell announced its $18 per share bid earlier this month.

    If it wins, HP would also need to pay the breakup fee of $72 million that is part of the Dell-3PAR deal. HP said that once the deal is accepted by 3PAR, it will close by the end of the year.

    HIGH VALUATION

    August has been a particularly active month for deals. Intel Corp bid $7.7 billion for security software maker McAfee Inc last week.

    The rapidly escalating bids for 3PAR come as Dell, HP and other large technology vendors like International Business Machines Corp and Cisco Systems Inc have been expanding into new technologies to offer corporate clients a wider range of products and services.

    3PAR specializes in high-end data storage, a key part of "cloud computing" -- an increasingly popular technology that enables computer users to access data and software over the Internet, allowing companies to cut costs.

    Some analysts say the bidding war over 3PAR has driven up valuations, raising the risk of the buyer overpaying.

    At current bids, 3PAR is valued at around eight times sales. Multiples above five are considered lofty in technology acquisitions.

    3PAR has barely made a profit since its 1999 founding.

    Some say, however, the company may be worth more than traditional metrics suggest, since its high-end storage technology is so hard to replicate and its sales could grow exponentially with the massive sales channels of Dell or HP.

    "On the face of it, it looks expensive, but if you make the assumption that they could double revenue, then it doesn't seem too expensive," said Gleacher's Moorjani.

    He said HP's bigger and more global sales team could bolster 3PAR revenue much more quickly than Dell could.

    The bidding war, a rare occurrence in the tech sector, started earlier this week when HP bid $24 a share for 3PAR, topping Dell's previous $18-per-share deal.

    In the last notable bidding war in the tech industry, EMC outbid NetApp last year to buy Data Domain for $2.4 billion. Data Domain was advised in that deal by Frank Quattrone, the same veteran technology banker who is advising 3PAR in the latest negotiations.

    Credit Suisse Group AG is advising Dell and JPMorgan Chase & Co advised HP.

    (Reporting by Ritsuko Ando and Soyoung Kim; Additional reporting by Paritosh Bansal; Editing by Derek Caney, John Wallace, Dave Zimmerman)
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  14.    #14  
    Hi all,

    This article does make a point, Dell used to be the cool company.....not anymore!

    Take care,

    Jay

    HP vs. Dell and the coolness factor
    August 27, 2010 –

    HP vs. Dell and the coolness factor

    Just saw that HP increased their bid for 3Par to $30. This is crazy; these people don’t know where to stop.

    That got me thinking about HP and Dell and how fast things changed.

    Just 5 years ago Dell was considered the cool one with multicolored hip desktops which you couldn’t even get in a store, but only online and HP was the boring one with white/black-only desktops distributed via boring traditional supply lines, i.e. stores.

    But somewhere along the way Dell lost its mojo. And HP guessed it right with their bet on “mobile” technology, So, HP concentrated on designing pretty laptops that appealed to consumers and as laptops started getting cheaper HP started overtaking Dell.

    It turns out consumers prefer laptops when they can afford them. It turns out that now in the US 75% of personal PCs are laptops and only 25% desktops. Desktops are un-cool now. And as far as laptops go Dell is behind the curve, theirs are clunky and unattractive. And so, HP won this round leaving Dell in the dust.

    But what is next? Both HP and Dell and other technology companies are trying to figure that out. It seems HP lost its creative engine with all the cost-cutting of the last 5 years and now they have to buy companies to come up with new products. I heard that they cut their research budget from 5% to 2% (under Randy Mott, who came from Wal-mart and Dell by the way). I don’t know if they’ll be successful. Probably not, if one is judging by this silly bidding war over 3Par. They just bought Palm and EDS. Now they can’t live without 3Par?
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  15.    #15  
    Hi all,

    Here is a little more background on why Dell wants 3Par...

    Take care,

    Jay

    Dell Sees 3Par as Doorway to Cloud Projects
    By STEPHEN LAWSON of IDG News Service\San Francisco Bureau, IDG,August 27, 2010

    Dell Sees 3Par as Doorway to Cloud Projects - NYTimes.com

    Dell believes an acquisition of high-end storage vendor 3Par would help it gain a foothold in large enterprises moving toward cloud computing, but it doesn't think Hewlett-Packard would necessarily steal away customers if it buys 3Par instead.

    "If you look at a lot of our customers, they are buying high-end systems, and in some cases they choose the high-end systems first, and then they choose the midrange and the low-end systems," said Praveen Asthana, vice president of enterprise solutions and strategy, during a question-and-answer session after a Dell press event in San Francisco on Friday morning. Asthana participated via conference call because he couldn't travel in the midst of the acquisition battle.

    Dell and HP's war over 3Par continued on Friday as the bidding hit the US$2 billion mark. Asthana spoke after HP had raised its offer to US$30 per share, or $2 billion, surpassing Dell's bid of $27 per share. 3Par has not accepted HP's latest bid. Dell kicked off the bidding on Aug. 16 when it announced it had agreed to buy 3Par for slightly more than $1 billion.

    3Par makes scalable, modular storage platforms with thin provisioning, which can allocate just the amount of storage that an application needs, leading to greater efficiency. Analysts believe owning it would help Dell expand its presence in large enterprises.

    Asked why Dell would invest so much money in a high-end storage business despite a weak forecast for global sales growth in that category, Asthana said there is "a healthy market" in high-end storage, in addition to its potential to pull in sales of less expensive products. 3Par's technology is also well-suited to enterprises consolidating and virtualizing their data centers to ultimately deliver IT as a utility, he said. Specifically, 3Par's platform lends itself to multitenant storage for services such as cloud computing, he said.

    "3Par is uniquely qualified in providing that kind of a storage technology right now," Asthana said. "There are very few other companies available to purchase."

    However, Asthana does not expect all its storage customers to flock to another vendor, such as HP, if Dell doesn't get 3Par. Dell is increasing its sales of lower-end storage gear, such as its EqualLogic line, without even having high-end storage like 3Par's today, he said.

    "It's not that if we don't have really high-end storage, they're going to leave us," Asthana said.

    Research firm IDC estimates the market for high-end storage platforms -- defined as systems that cost $250,000 or more for the initial hardware purchase -- will decline over the next four years. It forecasts $4.8 billion in sales in the category this year, falling to just $4.2 billion in 2014, IDC analyst Rick Villars said.

    However, that figure doesn't reflect the whole picture, Villars said. High-end storage is becoming more modular, so enterprises can buy systems over time, in parts that cost less than the $250,000 cutoff price, he said.

    Dell needs a high-end offering because it has to be able to supply all the parts of a data center to compete with other big vendors, Villars said.

    "In [enterprises] that are doing data-center transformation, it's about having the complete portfolio," with the vendor putting together the pieces, Villars said. "If you're missing one of the pieces, you're not just missing a storage opportunity, you're missing a full IT system opportunity."

    However, Villars agrees that all is not lost if Dell loses out in its quest for 3Par. There are smaller, less established vendors that might bring similar capabilities to Dell. Dell could also emulate other vendors such as Cisco Systems, which are building complete data-center portfolios partly through partnerships, he said.
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  16. #16  
    if 3PAR went from $9 a share prior to the Dell/HP bidding war, to $30/per share now, what is the proper valuation for EMC -- the leading high end storage company that also happens to own 80% of VMware (the leader in virtualization and cloud computing technologies) ??
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