Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1.    #1  
    HP projection technology could take a page from Star Wars

    Telepresence is not science fiction anymore. A lot of tests have been made already. maybe your will use and hologram presence text message in your next gen SUPER PRE, mid October 2010?

    According to Reuters this was PhilMckinney said this last past week about HP Halo project and you can find all the videos about this project on:
    Worldwide Tech: HP projection technology could take a page from Star Wars | Reuters

    or on youtube:






    In the future, business meetings might seem like a scene out of the movie, "Star Wars," if technology envisioned at HP comes to fruition.

    Stars Wars-like 3D projection technology is on the drawing board at the company, with the potential to project business persons at many locations into virtual reality-like meetings without them having to hop on airplanes and spend significant time away from home.

    "The whole concept behind how do you project somebody into the room is really, you have people who are scattered around the country but how do you recreate them so that they feel like they're part of the room," said Phil McKinney, CTO for the Personal Systems Group at HP, at the Emerging Display Technologies Conference on Thursday in San Jose, Calif. This capability can be done in a low-resolution format today but HP is pondering next-generation scenarios.

    When the movie "Star Wars" came out in 1977, a critical scene had R2D2, one of hero Luke Skywalker's robot helpers, project a holographic image of heroine Princess Leia putting out a distress call. 3D projections like what is eyed by HP would be made possible by advancements in RGB (red green blue) lasers, McKinney said.

    This sort of display technology is "still years out," he said. But as a forerunner, HP with its HP Halo rooms already is able to conduct meetings featuring high-definition video collaboration capabilities, McKinney said. HP Halo technology features "telepresence" and video conferencing.

    Step one in HP's vision would be an in-room experience. Subsequently, participants would be able to move out of the room, McKinney said.

    Also, McKinney noted HP's work in developing flexible displays, which are made out of mylar film. Users eventually could fashion a display out of an entire wall or desk surfaces, McKinney said. Full color and multi-touch capabilities are part of the effort, he said. Full video would be offered as well. Commercial products based on the technology are anticipated in two to three years. "
  2. #2  
    I'm not sure how well projecting live 3D images from different timezones would work out. When you are calling into a meeting, you can pretend to be in an office. It is hard to control all of the different environments for each attendee. Dressing up and creating a stage set so you can 'physically' and visually attend the meeting could be difficult.

    It could result in some funny attendees though:

    A guy who just climbed out of bed at 3am to attend the meeting. He is unshaven, hair is mussed up, and his shirt is buttoned wrong. He starts to get up for coffee then suddenly sits back down, because he remembers he didn't bother to put pants on. At one point, his partner sleepily wanders through the meeting wearing underwear.

    Someone is sitting there terrified with a thunderstorm raging outside.

    There could be one guy who is exhausted and still at the office at 9pm, while it is 10am for everyone else.

    Then there could be the person with a sunburn wearing a hawaiian print under a suitcoat.

    There is the personal assistant who just got in from a nightclub. Her dress is a little too tight, lipstick is smeared, and obviously she had a cocktail.

    There could be a guy at an airport. Announcements keep coming over a loud speaker, and right in the middle of the meeting an old lady sits down next to him, and starts knitting.

    My favorite person in my awkward worldwide 3D meeting is a woman wearing a bathrobe, with her hair flat on one side, and a little dog on her lap.

    IRL
    I've listened to podcasts recorded with participants in different locations, and I've seen/heard things happen like:

    The landscaper arrives and starts mowing the lawn outside.

    A cleaning crew shows up and tries to stealthly clean around the person on the podcast.

    FedEX comes to the door.

    A child or spouse walks into the room.

    A dog or a cat is wandering in and out.

    A fire truck passes by outside.

    A group of people start rioting outside because Paul McCartney just left the hotel (last week's Engadget podcast).

    Then there is sometimes a person who forgets to disconnect at the end, and you see them wandering around thinking they are alone.

    ----------
    Seems like it would be prohibitively expensive to set up a bunch of remote business locations.

    But that trailblazer in new technology the **** industry...
  3. #3  
    Or you can be presenting something all of a sudden you do a Squirrel

  4. navinag's Avatar
    Posts
    455 Posts
    Global Posts
    489 Global Posts
    #4  
    These rooms are pretty cool. I have used them a couple of times when I worked at HP a few years back.
  5.    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by SFHandyman View Post
    I'm not sure how well projecting live 3D images from different timezones would work out. When you are calling into a meeting, you can pretend to be in an office. It is hard to control all of the different environments for each attendee. Dressing up and creating a stage set so you can 'physically' and visually attend the meeting could be difficult.

    It could result in some funny attendees though:

    A guy who just climbed out of bed at 3am to attend the meeting. He is unshaven, hair is mussed up, and his shirt is buttoned wrong. He starts to get up for coffee then suddenly sits back down, because he remembers he didn't bother to put pants on. At one point, his partner sleepily wanders through the meeting wearing underwear.

    Someone is sitting there terrified with a thunderstorm raging outside.

    There could be one guy who is exhausted and still at the office at 9pm, while it is 10am for everyone else.

    Then there could be the person with a sunburn wearing a hawaiian print under a suitcoat.

    There is the personal assistant who just got in from a nightclub. Her dress is a little too tight, lipstick is smeared, and obviously she had a cocktail.

    There could be a guy at an airport. Announcements keep coming over a loud speaker, and right in the middle of the meeting an old lady sits down next to him, and starts knitting.

    My favorite person in my awkward worldwide 3D meeting is a woman wearing a bathrobe, with her hair flat on one side, and a little dog on her lap.

    IRL
    I've listened to podcasts recorded with participants in different locations, and I've seen/heard things happen like:

    The landscaper arrives and starts mowing the lawn outside.

    A cleaning crew shows up and tries to stealthly clean around the person on the podcast.

    FedEX comes to the door.

    A child or spouse walks into the room.

    A dog or a cat is wandering in and out.

    A fire truck passes by outside.

    A group of people start rioting outside because Paul McCartney just left the hotel (last week's Engadget podcast).

    Then there is sometimes a person who forgets to disconnect at the end, and you see them wandering around thinking they are alone.

    ----------
    Seems like it would be prohibitively expensive to set up a bunch of remote business locations.

    But that trailblazer in new technology the **** industry...
    well, this tech is not so far to be realized some time, sure all the scenarios have to be considered, but is taking more than 23 years (2012 maybe) for a plenty operational launch.

Posting Permissions