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  1.    #1  
    I'm an IT guy by trade and often get asked tech advice questions by friends and family that I don't always know or can find the answer to. A friend has recently asked me about eReaders and comparing the Kindle with Nook. I can easily find the specs and make a hardware comparison, but the question at hand is how much does pricing vary between the "pay for" books on the two platforms?

    I understand that both platforms have their "free" collections, but for a new release, are they comparable? My friend is heavily leaning towards the Nook, which makes a lot of sense, color screen, can do some gaming, has expansion card slot... but does it allow for highlighting sections or leaving notes in the margins, etc... I read something a while ago how the Kindle had an issue with automatically deleting books from people's devices and losing any notes and markups that the person made as well.

    All of the searches that I've found so far have been commercial type comparisons that haven't gone into the price per book or user experience, so any advice would be appreciated.
  2. Micael's Avatar
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    #2  
    Just a thought. Why lock in to one over the other if they are both releasing versions of their apps for other platforms? Things are heating up in this market, and some major players are jumping in. Additionally, as competition heats up along with the market, eBook pricing will fluxuate as well.

    I'd consider the most open ended option, and avoid proprietary platforms. For me, both the Nook and the Kindle in their current forms are already obsolete.
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  3. Micael's Avatar
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    #3  
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  4.    #4  
    Personally, I'm in the same boat as you about the open platforms and getting the app for something else, but usually when I'm trying to explain that to a non-tech person their eyes just glaze over. At least my friend didn't ask how an iPad compares with the other two
  5. Micael's Avatar
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    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by beerdini View Post
    Personally, I'm in the same boat as you about the open platforms and getting the app for something else, but usually when I'm trying to explain that to a non-tech person their eyes just glaze over. At least my friend didn't ask how an iPad compares with the other two
    If pressed, I'd tell them to wait for the release of HP's Slate and load both the Kindle app and the Nook app on it... plus do all the other cool stuff this thing will do. There's dozens of youtube videos on it to show them.
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  6. #6  
    My wife has a Nook, so hopefully, I can answer some of the questions.

    -Regarding the price per book, they're fairly similar. However, I think the Nook's prices per book tends to be slightly higher.

    -You can highlight and make notes, but it's very crude, IMHO. Also, it doesn't allow this functionality for .pdf files. But, future firmware updates might change this. It's not something most people will use for most books, so it's probably why you don't see it in reviews online. eReaders really aren't well suited for textbooks.

    The big advantage for me regarding the Nook is that it's relatively easy to hack and mess with. But obviously, that's probably not a strong selling point for most people.
    Richard Neff

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  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by RickNeff View Post
    My wife has a Nook, so hopefully, I can answer some of the questions.

    -Regarding the price per book, they're fairly similar. However, I think the Nook's prices per book tends to be slightly higher.

    -You can highlight and make notes, but it's very crude, IMHO. Also, it doesn't allow this functionality for .pdf files. But, future firmware updates might change this. It's not something most people will use for most books, so it's probably why you don't see it in reviews online. eReaders really aren't well suited for textbooks.

    The big advantage for me regarding the Nook is that it's relatively easy to hack and mess with. But obviously, that's probably not a strong selling point for most people.
    I also bought a Nook. The Android platform looked promising and the latest OS update brought a couple of games and a beta web browser (not very good at this point). The latest update also brought a badly needed speed boost and now page turns and browsing through books files is a little faster.

    At the time I did my research, I liked that the Nook would accommodate more of the book formats I was looking for. (I don't know if that has changed.) I have downloaded hundreds of free books in ePub format from Project Gutenberg (admittedly, these are "classic" books that are out of copyright). It will also read PDFs.

    The Barnes & Noble bestsellers have gone up a little, so I think Amazon's are a couple of dollars cheaper at this point.

    I looked at the iPad before I finally bought the Nook. The iPad has a beautiful screen (not a glare problem) and is very fast. But it is also heavy for an eReader. And the cheapest one costs almost twice as much as the Nook or Kindle. I'll be looking at the HP tablet when it comes out.

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