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  1. #21  
    Originally posted by Toby
    American megabrews are the reason for the old Eric Idle joke about making love in a canoe. In San Francisco, you'd have probably been able to pick up some Anchor. If this was in the 80s, Sierra Nevada would have been around as well. Sierra Nevada is generally a beginner hophead's beer, though (some PacNorthWesters probably consider it 'well-balanced').
    I agree it is the big boys that spoil it for the microbreweries..
    Some of the micro's are actually quite nice...

    On my recent trips I did discover Anchor Steam, Sierra Nevada, Sam Adams and found out that beverages and more even sell Grolsch (including Amber)
    <IMG WIDTH="200" HEIGHT="50" SRC=http://www.visorcentral.com/images/visorcentral.gif> (ex)VisorCentral Discussion Moderator
    Do files get embarrassed when they get unzipped?
  2.    #22  
    Originally posted by Toby
    Try a real german bock (or better a good abbey doppel) and you'll see what real beer tastes like.
    I have (in Germany, no less). Amber Bock was the closest I've had here. Problem is, in SD we don't get much imported here (population density and all). If you can get ahold of something good, I'd be all for sending you money (covering shipping as well, obviously).

    Have you heard of Henry Weinhard's?
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  3. #23  
    Originally posted by ****-richardson
    I have (in Germany, no less).
    And you can still stomach Amber Bock? Granted, I'd drink it before I drank the average BudMillerCoors product (of course, I'd drink water before I drank those ), but I could never see buying any.
    Amber Bock was the closest I've had here.
    You poor poor man.
    Problem is, in SD we don't get much imported here (population density and all).
    We can theoretically get quite a bit (I've seen what the distributors carry). The problem is that the local tastes generally shy away from the more adventurous stuff. At least, they usually stock Abita, Guinness, and Mackeson, though.
    If you can get ahold of something good, I'd be all for sending you money (covering shipping as well, obviously).

    Have you heard of Henry Weinhard's?
    Heard of it, but never tried it.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  4. #24  
    http://www.shiner.com/home.html

    While I am no expert on beer, other than beer bonging and keg standing in college, I have really liked the Shiner Bock they offer. Their Blond is also quite good.
  5. #25  
    Originally posted by DingoFish
    http://www.shiner.com/home.html

    While I am no expert on beer, other than beer bonging and keg standing in college, I have really liked the Shiner Bock they offer. Their Blond is also quite good.
    Shiner Bock isn't a real bock either (although it is better than Michelob Amber Bock).
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  6.    #26  
    Originally posted by Toby
    You poor poor man.
    Hmmmmm. I just assumed Americans made much weaker beer than anyone else in order to make more money.
    At least, they usually stock Abita, Guinness, and Mackeson, though.
    Names I'll have to keep in mind. I have tried Guinness. I don't know if I got a bad bottle, but it tasted very much as I imagine toilet water from a NY subway would.
    Heard of it, but never tried it.
    What have you heard?
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  7. #27  
    I have to admit I'm not a Guiness or a stout beer in general fan either...
    I guess it is an aquired taste..
    <IMG WIDTH="200" HEIGHT="50" SRC=http://www.visorcentral.com/images/visorcentral.gif> (ex)VisorCentral Discussion Moderator
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  8. #28  
    Originally posted by ****-richardson

    I have tried Guinness. I don't know if I got a bad bottle, but it tasted very much as I imagine toilet water from a NY subway would.
    Well put, have to remember that description..

    Oh, try it room temperature (as I did my first and will be *only* time) , it enhances the toilet water effect..
    "One of the most important things you learn from the internet is that there is no ‘them’ out there. It’s just an awful lot of ‘us’." -- Douglas Adams
  9. #29  
    Originally posted by ****-richardson
    Hmmmmm. I just assumed Americans made much weaker beer than anyone else in order to make more money.
    It's a feedback loop. They only make money off it because that's what people 'want'. People only want that because it's the only thing they know of as 'beer'. OTOH, most people only view beer as an alcohol delivery system anyway. That's why it's recommended to be served just above freezing. At that temp, you can't really taste anything.
    Names I'll have to keep in mind. I have tried Guinness. I don't know if I got a bad bottle, but it tasted very much as I imagine toilet water from a NY subway would.
    LOL...was it the Extra Stout? I think the pub draught being in bottles is fairly recent (and I've never tried the bottled version).
    What have you heard?
    Don't recall. I can't get it around here, so I didn't bother remembering.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  10. #30  
    Originally posted by ****-richardson

    I have tried Guinness. I don't know if I got a bad bottle, but it tasted very much as I imagine toilet water from a NY subway would.
    IMHO, Guiness should only be had if it is straight fromthe tap. Next, the cans with they're magical widget. As a last resort get it inn the bottle, or just skip it all together.

    There is a big difference in flavore depending on the delivery method.
  11. #31  
    Originally posted by ToolkiT
    I have to admit I'm not a Guiness or a stout beer in general fan either...
    I guess it is an aquired taste..
    I don't buy into the whole concept of 'acquired tastes'. If you have to convince yourself that it tastes good, it doesn't taste good (to you). Stouts just might not be for you. My palate is very malt-oriented, so beers that have a nice malt profile are my thing. Stouts, porters, Brit pale ales, Scots ale, real bocks, doppels, trippels, and marzen/octoberfests are all my preferred beverages. I like a good American pale ale every once in a while also, but I'm allergic to Cascade hops (which most use - or some derivative of Cascade) so I don't choose them often. I'm very seldom going to choose the Pils or Kolsch side of the spectrum.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  12.    #32  
    Originally posted by Toby
    It's a feedback loop. They only make money off it because that's what people 'want'. People only want that because it's the only thing they know of as 'beer'. OTOH, most people only view beer as an alcohol delivery system anyway. That's why it's recommended to be served just above freezing. At that temp, you can't really taste anything.
    Accuracy's a b!tch.
    LOL...was it the Extra Stout? I think the pub draught being in bottles is fairly recent (and I've never tried the bottled version).
    Yes, I believe it was the Extra Stout. Given:
    IMHO, Guiness should only be had if it is straight fromthe tap. Next, the cans with they're magical widget. As a last resort get it inn the bottle, or just skip it all together,
    I'll have to give it another shot, this time in a can.
    Don't recall. I can't get it around here, so I didn't bother remembering.
    You are fallible.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  13. #33  
    Originally posted by ****-richardson
    Yes, I believe it was the Extra Stout.
    Ahh...well, that's a different kettle of fish. It's much less accessible than most fare.
    Given:

    I'll have to give it another shot, this time in a can.
    Or if you can't find that, look for the _Pub_Draught_ in a bottle.
    You are fallible.
    Yep. I'm only the messenger. ;̃~~~~~
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  14. #34  
    Originally posted by Toby
    I don't buy into the whole concept of 'acquired tastes'.
    I do! but if I have to acquire a taste for something, I'd rather just go have something I like instead.
    The light at the end of your tunnel has been disconnected due to non-payment. Please remit funds immediately for restoration of hope.
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    #35  
    Originally posted by Toby
    I don't buy into the whole concept of 'acquired tastes'. If you have to convince yourself that it tastes good, it doesn't taste good (to you).
    It makes sense in some situations--essentially the "this is what you get served whether you like it or not" type of scenario. I agree that most people won't go out of their way to have something they don't like "just because they feel like it," but it's a different story if you're not choosing what's on the menu, or what you get from it.
  16. #36  
    Originally posted by Q
    It makes sense in some situations
    It doesn't to me at all in the context of 'learning to like something which you don't like'.
    --essentially the "this is what you get served whether you like it or not" type of scenario.
    That's not acquiring a taste for something. That's learning to tolerate something. If your only option to avoid starvation is to eat vermin, then most people would suck it up and eat vermin. However, you can't honestly tell me that when presented with their favorite dish prior to that situation, they're going to say, "No thanks, I quite like this vermin now".
    I agree that most people won't go out of their way to have something they don't like "just because they feel like it," but it's a different story if you're not choosing what's on the menu, or what you get from it.
    That's not at all what I'm talking about, though. In the context of beer, most people refer to 'acquired tastes' as being 'learning to like something' and not 'tolerating something because it's your only option'. I say with the variety of beers out there and the access to information to make your own (combined with the rarity of prohibitions against such), it's silly to waste time with beers that one doesn't like.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  17. #37  
    That's not acquiring a taste for something. That's learning to tolerate something. If your only option to avoid starvation is to eat vermin, then most people would suck it up and eat vermin. However, you can't honestly tell me that when presented with their favorite dish prior to that situation, they're going to say, "No thanks, I quite like this vermin now".

    I agree with the idea that an acquired taste is really not something I want to have. I think too many people try to "acquire a taste" for something so that others will think they're more sosphisticated, or learned. No thanks.

    BTW, welcome back from your sojourn away DR, I would have noticed earlier except I wasn't around (damn monkeys!).
    "I am a debtor both to Greeks and to Barbarians, both to the wise and to the foolish."
  18. #38  
    Originally posted by BobbyMike
    I think too many people try to "acquire a taste" for something so that others will think they're more sosphisticated, or learned.
    Right, like people who try to acquire a taste for esoteric, paper-pulp tasting expensive beers when a Corona Light, a Budweiser or a Beck's would do nicely. (or would do nicely at least for me!)
  19. #39  
    Originally posted by K. Cannon
    Right, like people who try to acquire a taste for esoteric, paper-pulp tasting expensive beers
    Which beers are those? Any beer that tastes like paper-pulp is bad (stale). That's oxidization at work. Either the brewer's not very good, or somebody's mishandling his beer.
    when a Corona Light, a Budweiser or a Beck's would do nicely. (or would do nicely at least for me!)
    Corona and Beck's are _extremely_ fragile beers. Clear and green glass are the worst things you can do to a beer when its habitat is going to be sitting on a shelf under flourescent lighting at room temperature. Stick it in a case in a cooler, and it'll have a chance to be the best Corona or Becks it can be (for whatever _that's_ worth ). As far as Bud is concerned, it gives me a headache. Smell that green apple smell? It's called acetaldehyde. It's endemic to their beers (their yeast strain produces it out the wazoo). It's part of their target profile, though, so they hit it every time. A-B has some of the most impressive processes out there. It's too bad that they don't try their hand at making something a bit more substantive. Guess it's a good thing I don't have to wait for them to do it.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  20.    #40  
    I came back in time to leave again. Indiana wanted me, and since it don't rain in Indianapolis in the summertime, I figured I go see dad. It was nice. I'm a different man. Anyone remember that great moment of emotional healing in Good Will Hunting? It wasn't anything like that. My son had a good time.

    Mapquest sucks. I suspect they get their funding from oil corporations. I shaved off 3 hours taking a look at a map for the return trip.

    Ceramic knives. Believe the hype? Discuss amongst yourselves.

    Anyone know how to make little green apples?
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
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