Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. klynn's Avatar
    Posts
    116 Posts
    Global Posts
    142 Global Posts
       #1  
    Hey my tech savy friends, I need some advice about DVR recording (ie: TiVo). My husband records old movies on video tape and transfers them to DVDs for his vast collection. The problem is that he misses a lot of movies because he forgets to set the machines or someone turns the channel not knowing he was going to record something later.

    I keep telling him that he should get a DVR recorder so he doesn't miss anything. But he doesn't think that he could transfer those recordings to DVD to keep. Is it possible to transfer those shows from the DVR devise to a DVD? Thanks for any input!
  2. #2  
    I believe as it stands now, they isnt a way to access the recorded information from the DVR devce (TiVO) to your PC. I may be wrong.

    Alternative:
    Use Windows Media Center (PC) to record his shows and movies. The software is included with Vista and Windows 7 operating systems. The movies and shows will be recorded to the PC's hard drive and Media Center program allows you to record the shows to DVD. Older shows can be moved to an external Hard Drive to make room for newer shows and movies on the PC.

    In the future I plan on getting a home Media Server. This way I can record my shows to the home Server and access the media on any computer or internet capabile device.
  3. #3  
    If you get a TiVo with enough HD space you won't really need DVDs as you can just keep them on the TiVo, but considering what he's doing is illegal anyway, there are other illegal mediums he can travel which will take a little download time, but he has access to any movie whenever he wants, no storage, and just as free.

    I personally think physical ownership/medium is dieing, not to mention the type of waste it produces if they are never watched. I would just suggest get the cheapest netflix membership, not only can you get four movies in a month (more for a better membership) but you can watch hundreds or even thousands of videos online, no junky DVD's to work with (and if you have a 360, and ps3 and wii I believe, you can watch all instant movies in HD).
  4. #4  
    The real answer is that it depends. TiVo used to have a certain model that could burn DVDs, but I don't think it's produced anymore. Current models can transfer recordings to a PC with the TiVo software. There is a free version which is a one way transfer and a paid version which will allow transfers both ways.

    Using the TiVo software to download combined with something like VideoReDo will let you burn to a DVD and create a cut list so that you can remove commercials or the tail end of another show. Nero Recode will let you convert the video for use on a PDA or iPod/iPhone (the TiVo software does it too, but only at the lower quality settings).

    Finally, certain shows will have the copyright flag enabled which TiVo honors, and you will not be able to transfer them. HTH.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  5. #5  
    MythTV!!

    They even have a specific Linux distribution designed around MythTV [a few, actually] -- Mythbuntu && Mythdora are two examples.

    Just get an old [pref. quiet, or even silent] desktop computer... pop in an analog tuner (pvr150,pvr350,pvr500, etc.) with a 1+ TB hard drive... and you've got yourself a great backend that will record as long as it's hooked up and turned on. I recommend other more "lightweight" machines for the frontend, but you can have them both on the same machine if you want.

    You can have the backend automatically transcode the files to any format you want, or just transcode them on demand. You customize it the way you want it. The flexibility of having 5 frontends displaying TV recordings from the same backend is the best part, tho. Every computer in my house has Ubuntu on it, so it's no problem for me to type in "sudo aptitude install mythtv-frontend"...

    But, with an open source solution as such, you have control over the media itself and can store it forever, prioritize the recordings so that it never deletes, or pop them on some DVDs. The choice is yours.

    It's really not as difficult as it all sounds, and I'm more than willing to help anyone who dares to setup their own MythTV box.

    Only costs $20/yr for the SchedulesDirect.org TV Listings service. Tivo users pay... what?? $130/yr??

    Being able to set my MythTV box to record ALL *new* episodes of Lost or whatever is pretty sweet.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by klynngullo View Post
    Hey my tech savy friends, I need some advice about DVR recording (ie: TiVo). My husband records old movies on video tape and transfers them to DVDs for his vast collection. The problem is that he misses a lot of movies because he forgets to set the machines or someone turns the channel not knowing he was going to record something later.

    I keep telling him that he should get a DVR recorder so he doesn't miss anything. But he doesn't think that he could transfer those recordings to DVD to keep. Is it possible to transfer those shows from the DVR devise to a DVD? Thanks for any input!
    Yes,you need Tivo DeskTop for PC and a video converter which can convert .tivo files.I use Pavtube.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by klynngullo View Post
    Hey my tech savy friends, I need some advice about DVR recording (ie: TiVo). My husband records old movies on video tape and transfers them to DVDs for his vast collection. The problem is that he misses a lot of movies because he forgets to set the machines or someone turns the channel not knowing he was going to record something later.

    I keep telling him that he should get a DVR recorder so he doesn't miss anything. But he doesn't think that he could transfer those recordings to DVD to keep. Is it possible to transfer those shows from the DVR devise to a DVD? Thanks for any input!
    Your easiest option would be to download a torrent of whatever it is you want a copy of, and then use something like Devede to dump it to DVD. Devede is linux, though. I'm not sure of what you would use on other platforms. Possibly handbrake, but I don't think it can output standard DVD ISOs.
    : (){:|:&};:

Posting Permissions