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  1. #141  
    Quote Originally Posted by darreno1 View Post
    His agency functioned just fine without him being there so l fail to see your point here. It's not a one man operation. And since his absence made no difference to the outcome he has nothing to explain to the American people imo. BP has some explaining to do.

    What exactly does BP have to explain at this point?
  2. #142  
    Quote Originally Posted by cjgem View Post
    What exactly does BP have to explain at this point?
    ??? Come again?
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  3. #143  
    Quote Originally Posted by darreno1 View Post
    ??? Come again?
    No habla inglés?
  4. #144  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    Not exactly, he was the CHIEF of staff. Hardly just a "staff" person. Please. That's like saying Rahm is just a staff person.....

    And as for what would I do differently? I'd be honest in my self critique and admit it when I failed to respond. I'd then analyze and plan how I could improve my performance and explain to the American people that plan.

    Seeing as you are almost the only person on earth that thinks they "failed to respond", excuse me while I guffaw at your answer.

    Staff is staff. His boss was there. For some reason that's not enough? Keep swimming, though, it's getting enjoyable watching you stretch.

    Strickland was accompanied by park- service staff, members of the Grand Canyon Association and several foundations that support the National Park Service, she said. Spouses joined as space was available and covered their own personal expenses.

    Strickland was eventually helicoptered out two days later as the scope of the spill worsened, going directly to the gulf to assess the potential impact on wildlife and coastlines, Rodriguez said.

    Strickland plays an important role in the department, but in this case, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar had deputized David Hayes, the department's deputy secretary, as the main point man on the spill.

    Officials point out that Hayes was in Louisiana the day after the rig exploded and sank, and Salazar has made several trips to the region and was to meet again Thursday with BP officials in Houston.
  5. #145  
    Davidra, there's no point showing them the facts. It's not a republican in charge and their pointless banther is supposed to be payback for us calling out the disaster that was the Bush administration. So for them everything Obama does is automatically wrong. You're wasting your time.
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  6. #146  
    Wenn Ihr Tatsachen beweisen Ihre Kniephänomen Bemerkungen falsch zu sein, sollten Sie einfach aufhören.
    Last edited by cjgem; 05/07/2010 at 02:20 PM.
  7. #147  
    "Oh crap leaking oil a mile deep ulls off shirt revealing cape and tights: Have no need to fear B Obama is here!"

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  8. #148  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    Excuse me. What part of "Though his agency was charged with coordinating the federal response to the major oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, Department of the Interior chief of staff Tom Strickland was in the Grand Canyon with his wife last week participating in activities that included white-water rafting, ABC News has learned." are you not getting?

    I guess you guy's definition of being "on it" is different than mine. I suppose he was texting in to his crackberry while he was shooting the rapids with his wife, coordinating away between torrents of water that were washing over the raft, a full 3 days after the leak was discovered. His coordination skills must be legendary.
    Your excused, what part of my post didn't you understand, this was, excuse the pun, a fluid event, what was on day one, was not on day two or day three or day four, etc etc. I will give you this, his WHOLE dept was charged with it, ummm what part of that don't you understand. If at the time of his departure it was decided that it was well in hand then his departure is a nonevent. The difference he would have made in something that no one, had any control over, ohhh except the past president who pushed through the part where the special blow our valves were not required, could it have made.
    As I said Micael, your grasping here, no wait, gasping is a better word.
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       #149  
    Quote Originally Posted by darreno1 View Post
    Ever heard of a cell phone? Computer? Email? If they needed his input I'm sure he was reachable.
    Hardly 100% on it from day 1, though. Not by the longest stretch of imagination. Well, maybe for your imagination.
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  10. #150  
    Quote Originally Posted by darreno1 View Post
    Davidra, there's no point showing them the facts. It's not a republican in charge and their pointless banther is supposed to be payback for us calling out the disaster that was the Bush administration. So for them everything Obama does is automatically wrong. You're wasting your time.
    heck we can always do what beck says,, just let it happen, the environment will take care of it. I agree with that statement completely, just move Beck down there and make sure all the locals know fully it was his idea to let the oil flow.. lol
    Life is short, Play hard, and enjoy every moment as if it was your last.
  11. #151  
    Quote Originally Posted by cjgem View Post
    What exactly does BP have to explain at this point?
    Well as much as i hate to, i have to agree, unless it can be proven they were negligent, hell people accidents do happen, machinery does fail. This is not exactly the safest industry to work in. I can honestly say based on the information at hand, BP is doing everything it can.
    Life is short, Play hard, and enjoy every moment as if it was your last.
  12. #152  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    Hardly 100% on it from day 1, though. Not by the longest stretch of imagination. Well, maybe for your imagination.
    Looks to me like you've dug a big enough hole, and now you've 'fallen and can't get up'.
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       #153  
    Quote Originally Posted by davidra View Post
    Seeing as you are almost the only person on earth that thinks they "failed to respond", excuse me while I guffaw at your answer.
    Almost the only person on earth.... you were saying?

    BP Is Criticized Over Oil Spill, but U.S. Missed Chances to Act
    New York Times
    By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON and ERIC LIPTON

    NEW ORLEANS — Officials in the Obama administration began for the first time Friday to publicly chastise BP America for its handling of the spreading oil gusher in the Gulf of Mexico, calling the oil company’s current resources inadequate to stop what is unfolding into an environmental catastrophe.

    As oil edged toward the Louisiana coast, fears continued to grow that the leak from the seabed oil well could spiral out of control. One official at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, in a widely distributed warning on Friday, said the oil flow could grow from the current estimate of 5,000 barrels a day to “an order of magnitude higher than that.”

    The increased level of concern was reflected in the sharp new criticism by federal officials of BP for not stopping the leak and cleaning up the spill before it reached land, something the company’s officials had said was possible earlier in the week.

    “It is clear that after several unsuccessful attempts to secure the source of the leak, it is time for BP to supplement their current mobilization as the slick of oil moves toward shore,” Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said pointedly, as the government announced steps to supplement its response with people and equipment from the Defense Department.

    Geoffrey S. Morrell, deputy assistant secretary of defense, said in a statement that the government would hold BP accountable for the cost of the department’s deployment, which as of Friday night included the Louisiana National Guard to help clean up coastal areas once the oil comes ashore.

    BP officials said they did everything possible, and a review of the response suggests it may be too simplistic to place all the blame on the oil company. The federal government also had opportunities to move more quickly, but did not do so while it waited for a resolution to the spreading spill from BP, which was leasing the drilling rig that exploded in flames on April 20 and sank two days later. Eleven workers are missing and presumed dead.

    The Department of Homeland Security waited until Thursday to declare that the incident was “a spill of national significance,” and then set up a second command center in Mobile. The actions came only after the estimate of the size of the spill was increased fivefold to 5,000 barrels a day.

    The delay meant that the Homeland Security Department waited until late this week to formally request a more robust response from the Department of Defense, with Ms. Napolitano acknowledging even as late as Thursday afternoon that she did not know if the Defense Department even had equipment that might be helpful.

    By Friday afternoon, she said, the Defense Department had agreed to send two large military transport planes to spray chemicals that can disperse the oil while it is still in the Gulf.

    (Edit: and by Sunday she was on cable lying about the Fed being on it 100% from day 1)

    Officials initially seemed to underestimate the threat of a leak, just as BP did last year when it told the government such an event was highly unlikely. Rear Adm. Mary E. Landry, the chief Coast Guard official in charge of the response, said on April 22, after the rig sank, that the oil that was on the surface appeared to be merely residual oil from the fire, though she said it was unclear what was going on underwater. The day after, officials said that it appeared the well’s blowout preventer had kicked in and that there did not seem to be any oil leaking from the well, though they cautioned it was not a guarantee.

    BP officials, even after the oil leak was confirmed by using remote-controlled robots, expressed confidence that the leak was slow enough, and steps taken out in the Gulf of Mexico aggressive enough, that the oil would never reach the coast.

    (The NOAA document on a potentially far larger leak, first obtained by The Press-Register in Mobile, Ala., was described by an agency spokesman as simply a possibility raised by a staff member, not an official prediction.)

    Some oil industry critics questioned whether the federal government is too reliant on oil companies to manage the response to major spills, leaving the government unable to evaluate if the response is robust enough.

    “Here you have the company that is responsible for the accident leading the response to the crisis,” said Tyson Slocum, director of Public Citizen’s Energy Program. “There is a problem here, and the consequence is clear.”

    But it is still the government, in this case the Coast Guard, that has the final say. A law passed a year after the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster makes "each responsible party for a vessel or a facility from which oil is discharged" liable for cleaning up a spill. But oversight of the cleanup is designated to the Coast Guard, with advice from other federal agencies.

    Rear Adm. Robert C. North, retired, who was commander of the Coast Guard’s Eighth District from 1994 to 1996, said that decisions in these situations are made collectively, but that the buck essentially stops with the federal coordinator — in this case, Admiral Landry. “The federal on-scene coordinator is kind of the one individual to say, ‘I think we need to do more’ or ‘That’s adequate,’ ” he said.

    If the government determines that the responsible party is not up to the job, it can federalize the spill, running the cleanup operations without the private company but billing it for the cost. This is a last resort, however.

    In this case, Admiral North said, the oil companies have more technology and expertise than the government. “It doesn’t appear that federalizing it would bring in any more resources,” he said.

    Officials from BP and the federal government have repeatedly said they had prepared for the worst, even though a plan filed last year with the government said it was highly unlikely that a spill or leak would ever result from the Deep Horizon rig.

    “There are not much additional available resources in the world to fight this thing offshore,” said Doug Suttles, BP’s chief operating officer for exploration and production, in an interview. “We’ve basically thrown everything we have at it.”

    Mr. Suttles said BP’s efforts did not change after it was disclosed Wednesday night that the leak was estimated at 5,000 barrels a day, five times larger than initial estimates had suggested. He said BP, which is spending roughly $6 million a day and will likely spend far more when oil reaches land, had already been mobilizing for a far larger spill.

    However, he did not deny that BP initially thought the slick could be stopped before it reached the coastline.

    “In the early days, the belief was that we probably could have contained it offshore,” Mr. Suttles said. “Unfortunately, since the event began we haven’t had that much good weather.” The first weekend after the sinking of the rig, choppy seas brought the cleanup to a near halt, and made more complicated tactics like controlled burns impossible.

    But even after the weather cleared — and just a few days before officials began acknowledging the likelihood of landfall — Tony Hayward, BP’s chief executive, expressed confidence the spill could be contained.

    Adm. Thad W. Allen, the commandant of the Coast Guard, said Friday that he agreed the situation was catastrophic and could continue to unfold for up to three months, but he said he remained satisfied with his team’s response, saying that even if it had initially known that the leak was 5,000 barrels a day, the response would have been the same. “While it may not have been visible to the public, from the very start, we have been working this very hard,” he said.

    Within a matter of hours of the report of the explosion, the Coast Guard had dispatched three cutters, four helicopters and a plane to the scene, helping to save 90 workers, including three critically injured ones who were sent by helicopter for emergency care.

    “We have never tried so many different methods for a large spill on the surface as we have during this, and I have been doing oil spill response for 30 years,” Admiral Allen said.

    Campbell Robertson reported from New Orleans, and Eric Lipton from Washington. Tom Zeller Jr. contributed reporting from New York, and Leslie Kaufman from New Orleans.
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  14. #154  
    they are all lies
  15. #155  
    How the hell could Homeland Security request a more robust response without knowing the severity of the spill? BP messed up in their initial analysis and probably downplayed the incident to the detriment of the environment. I cannot blame the Government here at all. However what's clear from this situation is that maybe the procedure regarding a spill (however small) should be changed so as not to be so reliant on the Oil Company to handle the initial analysis because they obviously couldn't get that right.

    I'm pretty sure some where along the line we will learn the real cause of this accident and negligence will be a major factor.
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  16. #156  
    Quote Originally Posted by darreno1 View Post
    How the hell could Homeland Security request a more robust response without knowing the severity of the spill? BP messed up in their initial analysis and probably downplayed the incident to the detriment of the environment. I cannot blame the Government here at all. However what's clear from this situation is that maybe the procedure regarding a spill (however small) should be changed so as not to be so reliant on the Oil Company to handle the initial analysis because they obviously couldn't get that right.

    I'm pretty sure some where along the line we will learn the real cause of this accident and negligence will be a major factor.
    oy vey
  17. #157  
    Quote Originally Posted by cjgem View Post
    oy vey
    Yeah, that's what BP will be saying while they foot the bill.
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       #158  
    Quote Originally Posted by darreno1 View Post
    How the hell could Homeland Security request a more robust response without knowing the severity of the spill? BP messed up in their initial analysis and probably downplayed the incident to the detriment of the environment. I cannot blame the Government here at all. However what's clear from this situation is that maybe the procedure regarding a spill (however small) should be changed so as not to be so reliant on the Oil Company to handle the initial analysis because they obviously couldn't get that right.

    I'm pretty sure some where along the line we will learn the real cause of this accident and negligence will be a major factor.
    Sure. Meanwhile, keep those blinders on and that bucket of koolaid handy

    Nobody is saying that BP isn't responsible or at fault. And the fact that the gov was sluggish is a problem, but it's not what I'm focused on. What I'm focused on is the misinformation machine that this admin employs at will, and how the media laps it up... and people like you do everything you can to ignore facts and deflect any focus on their mistakes.
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  19. #159  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    Sure. Meanwhile, keep those blinders on and that bucket of koolaid handy

    Nobody is saying that BP isn't responsible or at fault. And the fact that the gov was sluggish is a problem, but it's not what I'm focused on. What I'm focused on is the misinformation machine that this admin employs at will, and how the media laps it up... and people like you do everything you can to ignore facts and deflect any focus on their mistakes.

    You have yet to demonstrate this 'misinformation'. And you have yet to post the smoking gun. You seem to be seeing what you want to see. The fact is BP underestimated the problem for whatever reason. The chain of events that have occurred so far as a result of that sad fact is expected considering the current procedures that are in place. This is a learning experience for both parties (but more so the Government) and no reasonable person should expect everything to be perfect. However I have no reason so far to doubt they are not giving it the attention it needs.
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  20. #160  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    Almost the only person on earth.... you were saying?

    BP Is Criticized Over Oil Spill, but U.S. Missed Chances to Act
    New York Times
    By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON and ERIC LIPTON

    NEW ORLEANS — Officials in the Obama administration began for the first time Friday to publicly chastise BP America for its handling of the spreading oil gusher in the Gulf of Mexico, calling the oil company’s current resources inadequate to stop what is unfolding into an environmental catastrophe.

    As oil edged toward the Louisiana coast, fears continued to grow that the leak from the seabed oil well could spiral out of control. One official at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, in a widely distributed warning on Friday, said the oil flow could grow from the current estimate of 5,000 barrels a day to “an order of magnitude higher than that.”

    The increased level of concern was reflected in the sharp new criticism by federal officials of BP for not stopping the leak and cleaning up the spill before it reached land, something the company’s officials had said was possible earlier in the week.

    “It is clear that after several unsuccessful attempts to secure the source of the leak, it is time for BP to supplement their current mobilization as the slick of oil moves toward shore,” Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said pointedly, as the government announced steps to supplement its response with people and equipment from the Defense Department.

    Geoffrey S. Morrell, deputy assistant secretary of defense, said in a statement that the government would hold BP accountable for the cost of the department’s deployment, which as of Friday night included the Louisiana National Guard to help clean up coastal areas once the oil comes ashore.

    BP officials said they did everything possible, and a review of the response suggests it may be too simplistic to place all the blame on the oil company. The federal government also had opportunities to move more quickly, but did not do so while it waited for a resolution to the spreading spill from BP, which was leasing the drilling rig that exploded in flames on April 20 and sank two days later. Eleven workers are missing and presumed dead.

    The Department of Homeland Security waited until Thursday to declare that the incident was “a spill of national significance,” and then set up a second command center in Mobile. The actions came only after the estimate of the size of the spill was increased fivefold to 5,000 barrels a day.

    The delay meant that the Homeland Security Department waited until late this week to formally request a more robust response from the Department of Defense, with Ms. Napolitano acknowledging even as late as Thursday afternoon that she did not know if the Defense Department even had equipment that might be helpful.

    By Friday afternoon, she said, the Defense Department had agreed to send two large military transport planes to spray chemicals that can disperse the oil while it is still in the Gulf.

    (Edit: and by Sunday she was on cable lying about the Fed being on it 100% from day 1)

    Officials initially seemed to underestimate the threat of a leak, just as BP did last year when it told the government such an event was highly unlikely. Rear Adm. Mary E. Landry, the chief Coast Guard official in charge of the response, said on April 22, after the rig sank, that the oil that was on the surface appeared to be merely residual oil from the fire, though she said it was unclear what was going on underwater. The day after, officials said that it appeared the well’s blowout preventer had kicked in and that there did not seem to be any oil leaking from the well, though they cautioned it was not a guarantee.

    BP officials, even after the oil leak was confirmed by using remote-controlled robots, expressed confidence that the leak was slow enough, and steps taken out in the Gulf of Mexico aggressive enough, that the oil would never reach the coast.

    (The NOAA document on a potentially far larger leak, first obtained by The Press-Register in Mobile, Ala., was described by an agency spokesman as simply a possibility raised by a staff member, not an official prediction.)

    Some oil industry critics questioned whether the federal government is too reliant on oil companies to manage the response to major spills, leaving the government unable to evaluate if the response is robust enough.

    “Here you have the company that is responsible for the accident leading the response to the crisis,” said Tyson Slocum, director of Public Citizen’s Energy Program. “There is a problem here, and the consequence is clear.”

    But it is still the government, in this case the Coast Guard, that has the final say. A law passed a year after the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster makes "each responsible party for a vessel or a facility from which oil is discharged" liable for cleaning up a spill. But oversight of the cleanup is designated to the Coast Guard, with advice from other federal agencies.

    Rear Adm. Robert C. North, retired, who was commander of the Coast Guard’s Eighth District from 1994 to 1996, said that decisions in these situations are made collectively, but that the buck essentially stops with the federal coordinator — in this case, Admiral Landry. “The federal on-scene coordinator is kind of the one individual to say, ‘I think we need to do more’ or ‘That’s adequate,’ ” he said.

    If the government determines that the responsible party is not up to the job, it can federalize the spill, running the cleanup operations without the private company but billing it for the cost. This is a last resort, however.

    In this case, Admiral North said, the oil companies have more technology and expertise than the government. “It doesn’t appear that federalizing it would bring in any more resources,” he said.

    Officials from BP and the federal government have repeatedly said they had prepared for the worst, even though a plan filed last year with the government said it was highly unlikely that a spill or leak would ever result from the Deep Horizon rig.

    “There are not much additional available resources in the world to fight this thing offshore,” said Doug Suttles, BP’s chief operating officer for exploration and production, in an interview. “We’ve basically thrown everything we have at it.”

    Mr. Suttles said BP’s efforts did not change after it was disclosed Wednesday night that the leak was estimated at 5,000 barrels a day, five times larger than initial estimates had suggested. He said BP, which is spending roughly $6 million a day and will likely spend far more when oil reaches land, had already been mobilizing for a far larger spill.

    However, he did not deny that BP initially thought the slick could be stopped before it reached the coastline.

    “In the early days, the belief was that we probably could have contained it offshore,” Mr. Suttles said. “Unfortunately, since the event began we haven’t had that much good weather.” The first weekend after the sinking of the rig, choppy seas brought the cleanup to a near halt, and made more complicated tactics like controlled burns impossible.

    But even after the weather cleared — and just a few days before officials began acknowledging the likelihood of landfall — Tony Hayward, BP’s chief executive, expressed confidence the spill could be contained.

    Adm. Thad W. Allen, the commandant of the Coast Guard, said Friday that he agreed the situation was catastrophic and could continue to unfold for up to three months, but he said he remained satisfied with his team’s response, saying that even if it had initially known that the leak was 5,000 barrels a day, the response would have been the same. “While it may not have been visible to the public, from the very start, we have been working this very hard,” he said.

    Within a matter of hours of the report of the explosion, the Coast Guard had dispatched three cutters, four helicopters and a plane to the scene, helping to save 90 workers, including three critically injured ones who were sent by helicopter for emergency care.

    “We have never tried so many different methods for a large spill on the surface as we have during this, and I have been doing oil spill response for 30 years,” Admiral Allen said.

    Campbell Robertson reported from New Orleans, and Eric Lipton from Washington. Tom Zeller Jr. contributed reporting from New York, and Leslie Kaufman from New Orleans.
    i might humbly suggest the following, if the govt had of federalized the spill you would have been on here complaining about the damn socialist govt was doing things that oil companies know how to do.. that its just one more example of Obama and his socialist agenda...
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