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  1.    #1  
    Jon Stewart, the American political satirist, television host, actor, media critic and stand-up comedian, used his airing time on The Daily Show to offer his take on Gizmodo's iPhone exclusive and the police raid on Jason Chen's home, Gawker reports. He directly addressed Apple and Steve Jobs and criticized the way Cupertino is handling the case.

    The host of the satirical news program airing on Comedy Central downright slammed Apple yesterday evening for the way the company had been seen handling the Gizmodo iPhone leak case. He seriously questioned whether Jason Chen’s home had to be raided by the cops, featured a sign calling the Mac maker "Appholes," and finally took on Jobs & Co. for the extreme measures Apple took to protect intellectual property. A report by InOtherNews contains a partial transcript of some of the most relevant statements coming from Stewart's mouth.

    Video: Appholes | The Daily Show | Comedy Central
  2. twiktor's Avatar
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    #2  
    Yeah it was a quite a funny and completely true bit. Showing the old Big Brother spot from 84 or so was an especially nice touch as it is one of the same things I bring up when friends of mine who have joined The Church Of Jobs start getting the holy spirit and getting all preachy. That was an awesome ad though I'll give them that.
    I am losing my mind at an alarming rate . . . Actually, I'm not really alarmed at all.
  3. Micael's Avatar
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    #3  
    How much of it was Apple versus how much of it law enforcement? Apple may have not had any say in what the police did or did not do after they reported the theft. Do we know these details?
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    How much of it was Apple versus how much of it law enforcement? Apple may have not had any say in what the police did or did not do after they reported the theft. Do we know these details?
    how BARYE envies the childlike wonder of the innocent, the pure.
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  5. Micael's Avatar
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    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    how BARYE envies the childlike wonder of the innocent, the pure.
    Always a conspiracy, no?
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  6. #6  
    Has anyone ever had to deal with the police? You file a report of what has happened, and they deal with the rest. There are no inquires on what you, the person filing the report, would like done to an individual who may be in possession of your lost or stolen material (in this case). They take the information at hand and investigate it the way they were trained to.

    It amazes me that people think "Apple had his house raided!" No. Apple filed a report and the police let things get out of hand. Sure, it's easier to blame Apple, but it's just plain wrong. Notice, it is the police who bashed the guys door down, not Apple.

    Not to mention, Chen is a 100% ***** for paying $5000 for a device that isn't on the market and expecting everything to be peachy keen.
  7. #7  
    Apple visited iPhone finder before police did

    Apple Inc. reportedly knew who sold an apparent iPhone prototype before police broke into the home of a tech blog's editor last week.

    Wired on Tuesday reported about a visit by people who said they represented Apple to the home of a college age person who is said to have found the iPhone at a Redwood City beer garden...

    The source said the purported Apple representatives were turned away from the Silicon Valley home of the finder after asking for permission to search the premises...

    Wired's source said the finder tried to find the phone's owner and also tried to notify Apple before contacting the media about the device.

    “The idea wasn’t to find out who was going to pay the most, it was, 'Who’s going to confirm this?'” Wired quoted the source as saying.

    Wired said its source also disputed characterizing the $5,000 paid by Gizmodo.com as a sale. Instead it is said to was an agreement for exclusivity.

    "It was made very explicit that Gizmodo was to help the finder return the phone to its rightful owner or give it back,” the source reportedly said. “Gizmodo said they could help restore the phone."...
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  8. #8  
    So Apple tried to defuse the situation before involving the police. Good for them. Unfortunately it didn't work in their favor, so they had to involve the police. Please elaborate on what Apple is doing wrong here, they are doing a very good job playing to good guys imo.
  9. #9  
    "Gizmodo returned the iPhone to Apple last week after dismantling it and publishing stories, photos and video about it. This apparently happened before police were called into the matter."

    Notice it said "returned"...."before police were called into the matter." Question; was it a minutes, hours or days?
    Sprint: 2-TouchPad 32g, Frank.-Pre-2, Pre-, MiFi & 1-LG Lotus with Xlink tied to home handsets. Backups: 650 & 700wx

    HP Please release the CDMA Pre3 phones!
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  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by squeezy View Post
    So Apple tried to defuse the situation before involving the police. Good for them. Unfortunately it didn't work in their favor, so they had to involve the police. Please elaborate on what Apple is doing wrong here, they are doing a very good job playing to good guys imo.

    non kool-aid drinkers might be a little uncomfortable with El Jobso having his private dicks act as investigators -- asking to be able to search a private residence.

    When with extraordinary courage they said no -- he instead got the police to ask a judge to issue an insanely great overreaching search warrant that allowed them to break down the door and seize all computers, hard drives, phones, credit card bills, etc etc, of a journalist.

    just another day in Cupertino...
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  11. Micael's Avatar
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    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    non kool-aid drinkers might be a little uncomfortable with El Jobso having his private dicks act as investigators -- asking to be able to search a private residence.

    When with extraordinary courage they said no -- he instead got the police to ask a judge to issue an insanely great overreaching search warrant that allowed them to break down the door and seize all computers, hard drives, phones, credit card bills, etc etc, of a journalist.

    just another day in Cupertino...
    wow. Jobs did that? What was your source again? (btw, I like cherry kool-aid the best!)
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  12. #12  
    I have been looking at various articles trying to narrow it down to what day the phone was given back, the raid was on Friday the 23rd, signature on the warrant 7pm.

    Assuming the phone was returned before the the raid, it appears it was a lack of communication between Apple and the law enforcement. If the property is returned there would be no lawful means for his home to be searched, so a warrant would not be issued and signed by a Superior Court judge. If, however, they were not informed the property has been returned, the investigation would still be underway, resulting in his home being raided.

    We will never get the answers we are looking for. The point I am trying to make is; Yes Apple obviously contacted the police, rightfully so. Who were the men in blue that broke his door down and took all the "evidence"? The Police, not Apple.
  13. #13  
    Would you rather have a company approach you and try and resolve a situation, or would you have them come down with the full force of the law? They opted for the latter. You have your head too far up your *** to see that it seems.

    Also, as I have already mentioned, and should be common sense; THE POLICE ISSUE WARRANTS. Apple had NOTHING to do with what the police decided to take or leave. I cannot even comprehend why someone would think such a thing.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    wow. Jobs did that? What was your source again? (btw, I like cherry kool-aid the best!)
    your friendly neighborhood El Jobso store has all the Kool-Aid you thirst for -- but it only comes in apple flavor.

    Steve tells me you'll love it -- and its the only flavor you'll want or need again.

    "...a visit by people who said they represented Apple to the home of a college age person who is said to have found the iPhone at a Redwood City beer garden...

    The source said the purported Apple representatives were turned away from the Silicon Valley home of the finder after asking for permission to search the premises..."

    I'm betting that his private dicks are either retired (or off duty ??) detectives, folks with major influence with the guys wearing the blue uniforms
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  15. Micael's Avatar
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    #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    I'm betting that his private dicks are either retired (or off duty ??) detectives, folks with major influence with the guys wearing the blue uniforms
    That's the connection I was looking for! Thanks! Now I'm on board with that well documented and proven fact of major influence.
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  16. #16  
    I'm betting that his private dicks are either retired (or off duty ??) detectives, folks with major influence with the guys wearing the blue uniforms
    So you're whole argument is based on that hair-brain of an idea right there? Who is drinking the kool-aid now?
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    That's the connection I was looking for! Thanks! Now I'm on board with that well documented and proven fact of major influence.
    Quote Originally Posted by squeezy View Post
    So you're whole argument is based on that hair-brain of an idea right there? Who is drinking the kool-aid now?
    BARYE once lost his phone -- went to the men in blue.

    Despite being who BARYE is, what did the men in blue do ???

    They shrugged. And pretended to write a police report.

    For some incomprehensible reason they did not break down doors across the city to find the evil doer that absconded with his phone. The shame.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  18. #18  
    That would be because the one who stole it didn't have popular blog and post about having your phone, GASP!
  19. rfceo's Avatar
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    #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by squeezy View Post
    I have been looking at various articles trying to narrow it down to what day the phone was given back, the raid was on Friday the 23rd, signature on the warrant 7pm.

    Assuming the phone was returned before the the raid, it appears it was a lack of communication between Apple and the law enforcement. If the property is returned there would be no lawful means for his home to be searched, so a warrant would not be issued and signed by a Superior Court judge. If, however, they were not informed the property has been returned, the investigation would still be underway, resulting in his home being raided.

    We will never get the answers we are looking for. The point I am trying to make is; Yes Apple obviously contacted the police, rightfully so. Who were the men in blue that broke his door down and took all the "evidence"? The Police, not Apple.
    Gizmodo: Lost next-gen iPhone returned to Apple - USATODAY.com
    "Gizmodo returned the phone to Apple Monday night." That was the 19th four days before the warrant was issued.
  20. #20  
    Then Chen needs to sue the police dept. for raiding his home with an unlawful means.

    The more I read the more I wonder why people are giving Apple the hard time, the police are the one's who obviously f'd up.
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