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  1.    #1  
    For those who don't know, Jason Chen is the journalist that showed the world the new iPhone on Gizmodo.com. Well, it seems the cops have come and taken all his computers away from him at home.

    Police Seize Jason Chen's Computers - Iphone 4 leak - Gizmodo

    It's nice to see Apple supports free speech... Okay i don't really know if Apple called the cops, but something is fishy.
  2. #2  
    Wow...that was crazy....im surprised this news is not catching traction yet....Isn't Gizmodo the site that always talks the never ending doom and gloom of PALM ????
  3. #3  
    Im sure thre is alot more to it. Remember when gizmodo put a bounty on any information regarding the ipad? Nilay Patel, patent lawyer working for engadget, picked up his old school books and found a section saying that it was illegal. Then apple sent a cease and desist letter. Then they didn't even get their review ipad on time. Then somone by chance loses an iphone yet to be released and gizmodo pays for it? I'm sure apple has it out for Chen and his friends.
    I am no longer a part of the Pre Central Community.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by gobanjoboy View Post
    For those who don't know, Jason Chen is the journalist that showed the world the new iPhone on Gizmodo.com. Well, it seems the cops have come and taken all his computers away from him at home.

    Police Seize Jason Chen's Computers - Iphone 4 leak - Gizmodo

    It's nice to see Apple supports free speech... Okay i don't really know if Apple called the cops, but something is fishy.
    Wow. I hope he will sue Apple for this... I know I would. And I had just read the account of the guy that had an off duty trooper pull a gun on him for speeding on his motor cycle:
    http://carlosmiller.com/2010/04/16/m...-cop-with-gun/


    Rodney King, where are you?
  5. #5  
    no one would dare touch any lost future apple prototypes now...
  6.    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    So, if you accidentally leave your smartphone (or anything else that you designed and made like a software program) in a bar am I free to pick it up, take it apart, and post whatever info I find on it on my blog? Are you going to narc on me or will you continue to support my right to free speech? Just checking.
    Jason got it from the guy who found it at the bar. The phone was not stolen. The guy that found it at the bar, called Apple looking to return it. Apple never returned any of his phone calls. I don't see why you have a problem with Jason Chen.
  7. lupos's Avatar
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    #7  
    I'm sure apple called the cops. But I wouldn't blame apple for police not knowing the law. Sucks though.
  8. #8  
    Why am I not surprised
  9. #9  
    Actually by definition the phone was stolen. The person that found it at the bar had a legal responsibility to turn it over only to the owner, the bar, or the authorities. Instead he sold the phone. Gizmodo is guilty of purchasing stolen property at the very least.
  10. psvillars's Avatar
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    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    So, if you accidentally leave your smartphone (or anything else that you designed and made like a software program) in a bar am I free to pick it up, take it apart, and post whatever info I find on it on my blog? Are you going to narc on me or will you continue to support my right to free speech? Just checking.
    Well if your dumb enough to just leave it lying around in a bar then you deserve what happens to you. This is Apples fault for losing it in the first place someone just happened to find it and sold it and the person that bought it took pictures of it and posted them on the internet. The Iphone in question wasn't stolen, no one broke into apple and took it, it was found. I don't think anyone should be arrested or sued except maybe the guy that had his computers confiscated, if anything should happen the ***** that lost the iphone should not have a job right now.
  11.    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by psvillars View Post
    if anything should happen the ***** that lost the iphone should not have a job right now.
    Funny you say that. It seems there maybe be double standards on that subject. Steve Wozniak On Apple Security, Employee Termination, and Gray Powell - Steve Wozniak On Apple Security, Employee Termination, and Gray Powell - Steve Wozniak - Gizmodo
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by psvillars View Post
    Well if your dumb enough to just leave it lying around in a bar then you deserve what happens to you. This is Apples fault for losing it in the first place someone just happened to find it and sold it and the person that bought it took pictures of it and posted them on the internet. The Iphone in question wasn't stolen, no one broke into apple and took it, it was found. I don't think anyone should be arrested or sued except maybe the guy that had his computers confiscated, if anything should happen the ***** that lost the iphone should not have a job right now.
    I'm thinking that they may have evidence to support the theory that it was not found alone in a bar and that is just a cover story.
    I am no longer a part of the Pre Central Community.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by modeerf View Post
    Actually by definition the phone was stolen. The person that found it at the bar had a legal responsibility to turn it over only to the owner, the bar, or the authorities. Instead he sold the phone. Gizmodo is guilty of purchasing stolen property at the very least.
    As mentioned above he did do his "legal responsibility" but Apple wasn't interested. So he sold it.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by modeerf View Post
    Actually by definition the phone was stolen. The person that found it at the bar had a legal responsibility to turn it over only to the owner, the bar, or the authorities. Instead he sold the phone. Gizmodo is guilty of purchasing stolen property at the very least.
    No, he gave it to a group of people because he thought it belonged to one of them. One of the people in that group eventually realized it might be important. That's who they bought it from.
  15. groovy's Avatar
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    #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by modeerf View Post
    Actually by definition the phone was stolen. The person that found it at the bar had a legal responsibility to turn it over only to the owner, the bar, or the authorities. Instead he sold the phone. Gizmodo is guilty of purchasing stolen property at the very least.
    This.

    One who finds lost property under circumstances which give him knowledge of or means of inquiry as to the true owner, and who appropriates such property to his own use, or to the use of another person not entitled thereto, without first making reasonable and just efforts to find the owner and to restore the property to him, is guilty of theft.
    CAL. PEN. CODE § 485 : California Code - Section 485

    Also: http://www.aroundthecapitol.com/code...0/2080-2080.10
    Last edited by groovy; 04/26/2010 at 04:45 PM.
  16. #16  
    Will be interesting to see if Gizmodo keeps praising Apple after this "incident"...
  17. psvillars's Avatar
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    #17  
    ok but as stated earlier the person that found the iphone called apple trying to return it and apple ignored them now if you drop 50$ in front of me and I pick it up and say hey you drop some money and you basically say whatever then it's not stealing if i keep it I made an attempt to give you the money and you chose not to listen, your loss.
  18.    #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by Pulp View Post
    Will be interesting to see if Gizmodo keeps praising Apple after this "incident"...
    As must publicity Gizmodo is getting form this, which means more web traffic for their Ads, I'm sure this is an acceptable loss.

    The iFanboys will forget this ever happened.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    No, he gave it to a group of people because he thought it belonged to one of them. One of the people in that group eventually realized it might be important. That's who they bought it from.
    No, I can understand that most don't understand the laws (at least in most states), but ignorance is no excuse. Laws in most states require that "found property" be turned over to the owner of said property. If the owner of the property cannot be located, the property is to be turned over to the local Police Department where a "Lost Property" report is filed. The information of "all things stolen" are stored in a nationwide database (Usually to go on the database it needs some type of ID mark or #). Generally, if it is an item of value, the property division of a police dept would try to locate the owner(s). Usually, if the property is not claimed within 5 years, the property goes into police auctions where they sell found property, property recovered or confiscated from crimes etc..

    There is no "finders keepers" rule if you don't report the item lost. By selling the item it then becomes stolen property (although technically a weak case). Jason Chen COULD technically be charged with receiving stolen property. That case would even be weaker, but it all depends if he knew the phone was lost or stolen.

    Regardless, I don't know what the laws were in this particular state, but I highly doubt it will result in criminal charges......Maybe a lawsuit though.
    Phones in Family pre> pre> pre> Centro> Rant
  20. groovy's Avatar
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    #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by psvillars View Post
    ok but as stated earlier the person that found the iphone called apple trying to return it and apple ignored them now if you drop 50$ in front of me and I pick it up and say hey you drop some money and you basically say whatever then it's not stealing if i keep it I made an attempt to give you the money and you chose not to listen, your loss.
    But the laws about what constitutes a reasonable attempt to find the owner aren't really up for debate. If the property of the item is estimated to be $100 or more the finder, if they choose to "take charge" of the item, has to either return it to the owner or turn it into the police. Of course, the finder could leave it with the owner of the business in which it was found but if they choose to take it with them they basically take on the legal responsibility.

    The fact that not very many people follow the law does not change the law.
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