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  1. #61  
    Quote Originally Posted by angiest View Post
    or to require the use of prescriptions for certain medications?
    Quote Originally Posted by Freshyz View Post
    California is already off the hook on the medical side.. .
    Quote Originally Posted by Stevesrjr86 View Post
    Plus with soo many other states picking up medicinal marijuana as an alternative,
    Quote Originally Posted by furygoalbrtis39 View Post
    -It's already legal in California for medical reasons
    You want to smoke pot, and not get arrested right? That's your whole point.
    What makes all this medical blahblah a valid argument in this discussion?

    Btw; I live in a country where it has been legalized and have no problem with that. Well not a big problem.
  2. #62  
    Quote Originally Posted by GuyFromNam View Post
    Btw; I live in a country where it has been legalized and have no problem with that. Well not a big problem.
    I was unaware that there was even a single country, in which "THE herb" is truly legal.

    I remember in 2006, Mexico made it legal in small quantities. That was the closest I've ever come to seeing any country "be legal".
  3. #63  
    Quote Originally Posted by GuyFromNam View Post
    You want to smoke pot, and not get arrested right? That's your whole point.
    What makes all this medical blahblah a valid argument in this discussion?

    Btw; I live in a country where it has been legalized and have no problem with that. Well not a big problem.
    Me using marijuana as my medicine, replaced taking 25+ medications a day. With alot of people wanting to save money on meds, dr bills, and insurance costs, get a medical card is a smart decision if you're ok with pot.
  4. #64  
    I say why not? Alcohol and tobacco are worse, and revenue can be made with taxation. I don't smoke pot, will the legalization change that... No. I don't smoke, not because of religious or morals I just don't. It's never really called my attention. If people can benefit from using it for medical reasons or recreational use, I say why no??
  5. #65  
    Quote Originally Posted by bullonparade85 View Post
    I say why not?
    Well... because the authoritarians tell you "No", of course.

    If you're caught with pot now, you could get fined, jailed and then fined or put on probation and fined, possibly put in the penitentiary if you have enough pot, coersed into paying lawyer fees, giving the cops something good to steal from their "subjects", then allowing the towing company to make a couple hundred $$ off jacking your property, while you're in handcuffs, or possibly just "claiming" your automobile for themselves, where they'll auction it off and buy new patrol SUVs...

    That's just the "enforcement" side of the economics behind why pot isn't legal.

    Then there's the fact that it *would* cut into other industries... cotton, oil, paper, medicine, etc.

    The correct answer to your question is... ECONOMICS, IN THE EYES OF THE AUTHORITARIANS.
  6. #66  
    Drugs are !!!


    "How art thou, thou globby bottle of cheap, stinking chip oil? Come and get one in the yarbles, if ya have any yarbles, you eunuch jelly thou!"
  7. #67  
    Quote Originally Posted by sketch42 View Post
    That was fast.. Lol...
    But I think those numbers will rise once it is legal.. When the first child gets killed from a pothead behind the wheel .

    --Sent using Tap@Talk for webOS

    What numbers?!?! There are no numbers. lol

    I would feel safer on the streets with the potheads rather than the drunks.

    All I know is there are much worse people I would like behind bars then a pot smoker.
  8. Micael's Avatar
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       #68  
    Marijuana Crushes Grapes as Cash Crop
    by Matt Baume, Oct. 20, 2010

    The most persuasive argument for legalizing pot might just be a dollar sign.

    California's pot crop is worth $14 billion, according to a state report. The Press Democrat points out that crushes the wine crop which comes in at $2 billion.

    Legalization would be a huge shot in the arm for plenty of ancillary industries, such as banking and construction.

    Of course, there's always the possibility that the federal government would crack down. That risk might make investors too skittish to get involved. Earlier this month, Attorney General Eric Holder announced that the government would continue its dangerous raids.

    Some regions, such as Mendocino County, have leaned on pot agriculture as other industries dried up. It's estimated that at least half of that county's economy depends on cultivation of the plant.

    The only sure thing is that there's no sure thing. Marijuana legalization is uncharted territory. Or at least, it's uncharted in this country. Other countries have managed to figure it out, but here in The Land of the Free, we've clung to prohibition.

    Earlier, the state estimated that it could rake in $1.4 billion in taxes if Prop 19 passes, but they've since backed off that estimate, claiming that there are too many unknown variables. Prop 19 would allow each individual municipality to set its own pot regulations, which some detractors have said will create an unwieldy patchwork of laws. Coincidentally, most of those who oppose legalization are those who make money from prohibition: law enforcement agencies and the alcohol industry.

    Meanwhile, the San Francisco Patient and Resource Center has established a gleaming treatment center for medical usage. The attractive, safe space has turned into big business, luring patients from around the city by offering extras like meditation classes, social events, and art.

    //
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  9. groovy's Avatar
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    #69  
    Has anyone considered the likelihood of a group of people—perfectly used to and happily operating in the shadows and circumventing law enforcement—suddenly wanting to become a legitimate, tax-paying business enterprise? Of course, one might say those groups would be driven out of business by legitimate businesses who sell to the masses that are unwilling to take the risks of buying it drugs illegally. On the other side, the difference in legal ramifications between buying illegal drugs and buying legal drugs illegally is huge. I submit that a good number of growers and distributors will continue business as usual.
  10. #70  
    Quote Originally Posted by groovy View Post
    Has anyone considered the likelihood of a group of people—perfectly used to and happily operating in the shadows and circumventing law enforcement—suddenly wanting to become a legitimate, tax-paying business enterprise? [...] I submit that a good number of growers and distributors will continue business as usual.
    History is not on your side. Prohibition is the biggest example.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  11. groovy's Avatar
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    #71  
    Quote Originally Posted by Toby View Post
    History is not on your side. Prohibition is the biggest example.
    What side is my side? I'm just pointing out that there is already a well established underground distribution network that won't benefit much from legalization, less so this sort of quasi-legalization. The difference, I think, from prohibition is that there was a an established, publicly supported industry waiting in the wings. You may be right but I don't see the two as completely analogous.
  12. #72  
    If it is eventually legalized, people should find a way to use it that doesn't involve smoking it;because,smoking kills 393,000 each year in the USA.

    "Marijuana smoke contains a greater amount of carcinogens than tobacco smoke. In addition, marijuana users usually inhale more deeply and hold their breath longer than tobacco smokers do, further increasing the lungs' exposure to carcinogenic smoke."

    Health Effects of Smoking- American Lung Association
  13. #73  
    Quote Originally Posted by BobKy View Post
    If it is eventually legalized, people should find a way to use it that doesn't involve smoking it;because,smoking kills 393,000 each year in the USA.

    "Marijuana smoke contains a greater amount of carcinogens than tobacco smoke. In addition, marijuana users usually inhale more deeply and hold their breath longer than tobacco smokers do, further increasing the lungs' exposure to carcinogenic smoke."

    Health Effects of Smoking- American Lung Association
    ....all lies....
    -- VZW Pre+ -- Uberk/Gov fixed @ 1ghz -- QPST gps mod -- stock battery (?mugen 3800?) --
  14. #74  
    Quote Originally Posted by BobKy View Post
    If it is eventually legalized, people should find a way to use it that doesn't involve smoking it;because,smoking kills 393,000 each year in the USA.

    "Marijuana smoke contains a greater amount of carcinogens than tobacco smoke. In addition, marijuana users usually inhale more deeply and hold their breath longer than tobacco smokers do, further increasing the lungs' exposure to carcinogenic smoke."

    Health Effects of Smoking- American Lung Association
    "Tobacco is my favorite vegetable."

    -- Frank Zappa


    That's my favorite quote, but it's not my favorite vegetable.

    Tobacco affects my breathing negatively, but weed actually makes me breathe better. This is the case for many asthmatics that I know.

    Water pipes are awesome. Baking cookies/brownies are awesome. Vaporizers are OK. Just not my thing. I'd rather smoke a blunt.
  15. #75  
    It's interesting that you should mention Frank Zappa,as he died at age 52 from prostate cancer. Research has shown that smoking may be a cause of prostate cancer and may hasten its progression.

    Composer, guitarist Frank Zappa succumbed to prostate cancer in 1993.


    Does Smoking Cause Prostate Cancer?
  16. #76  
    Quote Originally Posted by groovy View Post
    What side is my side?
    Quote Originally Posted by groovy View Post
    I submit that a good number of growers and distributors will continue business as usual.
    I'm just pointing out that there is already a well established underground distribution network that won't benefit much from legalization, less so this sort of quasi-legalization.
    I wouldn't think it would. Speakeasies and underground distribution networks of liquor certainly didn't benefit from the repeal of prohibition.
    The difference, I think, from prohibition is that there was a an established, publicly supported industry waiting in the wings.
    Most of the major ones had to retool. The smaller ones mostly went out of business. Realistically, the tobacco companies might easily be able to ramp up to compensate for the anti-tobacco bent the country has been on lately.
    You may be right but I don't see the two as completely analogous.
    Why not?
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  17. #78  
    Quote Originally Posted by BobKy View Post
    It's interesting that you should mention Frank Zappa,as he died at age 52 from prostate cancer. Research has shown that smoking may be a cause of prostate cancer and may hasten its progression.

    Composer, guitarist Frank Zappa succumbed to prostate cancer in 1993.


    Does Smoking Cause Prostate Cancer?
    I'm more positive than I've ever been that he didn't regret it one bit.

    He lived his life to the fullest. He never once doubted himself. He never once sold out to the world. He is a legend.

    Now, we can't all be Frank Zappa. But we can all partake in God's green herbs by baking it into delicious treats, by vaping it, and by filtering it thru water. Please puff the peace pipe, or **** off, pipsqueak. Sorry, I was just on a roll with the alliteration.
  18. #79  
    Quote Originally Posted by woodmaster View Post
    He's got a point...

    "The bottom line is that both of these drugs are relatively harmless when used in moderation and each can cause huge medical/psychiatric problems when abused.

    Wake up, America!"
  19. #80  
    ....its my medicine...i have rheumatoid arthritis and degenerative disc disease....i'm in pain constantly...i'm also nauseous and have a highly variable appetite....oh, I forgot, i'm severely allergic to opiates....thats, almost all the"pain killers" that are used by modern medicine...i couldn't even have morphine when I had my back fused....so what about me?
    -- VZW Pre+ -- Uberk/Gov fixed @ 1ghz -- QPST gps mod -- stock battery (?mugen 3800?) --
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