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  1. Micael's Avatar
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       #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by groovy View Post
    NOOOOO!!!! No more from the federal level for a while, please!
    That's what it took to repeal prohibition. Like alcohol, it should be lifted at the federal level, but left to each state and/or county to decide whether or not they want to comply, much like wet/dry counties in Texas.
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  2. #22  
    Rent a (Netflix) DVD call "The Union - The Business Behind Getting High". Both the cops AND the crooks are staunchly against legalization. When the good guys and the bad guys are on the same side of something, it's probably the wrong side.
  3. Micael's Avatar
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       #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleCutter View Post
    Rent a (Netflix) DVD call "The Union - The Business Behind Getting High". Both the cops AND the crooks are staunchly against legalization. When the good guys and the bad guys are on the same side of something, it's probably the wrong side.
    Actually, its on youtube.... broken into 11 parts I think. Watch .
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  4. #24  
    Oregon has considered a 100.00 per ounce tax - which is ridiculous - depending on the taxes, unless they were reasonable, I would still probably continue to get through an "underground" source (or grow my own!)

    It needs to be legalized, taxed, and companies should not be allowed to drug test during the hiring process (as i just lost getting a new incredible freaking job because of having to pee in a stupid cup!)
    smiles for your day ~ pixielee
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  5. #25  
    I hate all this "decriminization" crap. FULL LEGALIZATION. Of every recreational substance.
    August 2009 - January 2011. Thank god I'm no longer a Pre user!

  6. #26  
    Never done a single non prescribed drug other than alcohol....seriously....just was never my thing. But I really could care less if they want to legalize marijuana. I say let's tax the out of it. Heck, we gamble to raise money for educating the children (lotto!), why not have people get high to fund healthcare?
    PalmPilot, PalmIIIc, Treo 650, Pre, Pre 3, Nokia 1020, Lumia 950

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  7. Micael's Avatar
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       #27  
    November vote may only cloud issue of pot smoking

    By DENIS C. THERIAULT/MediaNews Group
    Created: 03/29/2010 02:30:28 AM PDT

    SACRAMENTO -- Californians on Thursday woke to the surprising news that, come November, they'll get to decide whether their state should be the first to legalize marijuana. And with that news came one whopper of a question:

    Dude . . . we can do that?

    According to law professors and other experts, the answer is yes -- but ...

    No matter what Californians decide, marijuana will still be illegal under federal law.

    That means a tangle of legal and political questions must be confronted before advocates can realize their dream of freely growing, selling and using marijuana everywhere in the Golden State. First, voters have to sign off on what might be a contentious campaign -- no sure thing, despite recent polls showing an upswing in support. And complaints from neighboring states, whose residents could flock to California, may prove too loud for the White House to ignore. Federal prosecutors and drug agents, who have largely let state prosecutors handle drug crimes in recent decades, could begin to intervene in smaller-scale cases.

    "The pressure on the Obama administration to try to block this or resist it is going to be enormous," said Robert MacCoun, a UC Berkeley law professor and drug policy expert. "It's very hard for a single state to pass a law like this and implement it."

    Moreover, experts say, approval of the referendum could trigger a backlash against Proposition 215, the state law that authorizes medicinal use of marijuana. While the Obama administration last year promised to turn a blind eye to sick people, even though medical marijuana also conflicts with federal law, it may not be willing to do the same when it comes to street-corner dealers and folks who just want to get high.

    Advocates on Thursday appeared more sanguine. "The federal government is going to allow the state of California to move forward with this," said Salwa Ibrahim, spokeswoman for the pro-legalization campaign led by cannabis activist Richard Lee of Oakland. "We're not worried about it."

    The initiative, officially the Regulate, Control and Tax Cannabis Act of 2010, was certified for November's ballot Wednesday after backers turned in signatures from hundreds of thousands of voters.

    If it's approved, adults 21 and older would be permitted to possess up to an ounce of marijuana; anyone could grow up to 25 square feet of plants per residence; and local governments would be asked to craft rules on distributing and taxing marijuana. The Secretary of State's Office said it would take effect the day after Election Day.

    Both the governor's office and the office of the state attorney general declined to comment on the initiative Thursday. Attorney General Jerry Brown, who also will appear on the November ballot as the Democratic nominee for governor, is charged with writing official ballot summaries for initiatives and told reporters he should remain neutral for that reason.

    Supporters are emboldened in part by a Board of Equalization estimate that said marijuana tax revenue could add more than $1 billion to the state's starved coffers -- although some experts question that, saying few people likely would report marijuana sales on their federal income taxes for fear of prosecution.

    "If other states do this, over time, that might affect Congress' attitude, and the president's," said Vikram Amar, a law professor at UC Davis. "But until federal law changes, I wouldn't advise someone to run the risk of getting thrown in federal jail."

    ###
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  8. #28  
    The problem for the Federal Government is that no matter how hard they fight it, they can't win. I personally don't like it, but it is a plant! It grows naturally! Too many people want it legalized and it's only a matter of time.

    In fact, in 1998 Washington DC Ballot Initiative 59 "Legalization of Marijuana for Medical Treatment Initiative of 1998" was passed by 69% of Washington DC voters which permitted seriously ill individuals to legally use marijuana for medical treatment when recommended by a licensed physician. However, the initiative has yet to be fully enacted due to the Barr Amendment, which banned the city from funding legalization efforts.

    DC was left in the cold. It's coming, it will just take awhile for the corrupt politicians to research the history of why it was made illegal in the first place, race, money and William Randolf Hearst.

    Joe Rogan puts it best


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  9. #29  
    not
    ĦṔ-Ḷṫ-Ŧḯη
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  10. #30  
    Forget "starting with decriminalization"....

    Let's get full on legalization. Currently, t's not unlawful to possess and use a drug of any kind... only illegal. There is a distinction.

    As long as you are not (1) harming someone, (2) harming someone's property, (3) committing fraud in your contracts.... you have broken no law.

    Legalities are something reserved for "persons", which, if you'll look in Black's Law Dictionary... includes corporations!! A U.S. Citizen is also a person because of certain contracts that you unknowingly consent to, by, essentially, not asking the right questions and not claiming your rights.

    A person is essentially somebody who is bound by statutory law. If you become a U.S. National, Constitutional citizen, or State citizen... then the U.S. Government has no power over you, so long as you:

    1. Ask the right questions.
    2. Claim your rights!

    Even being a Constitutional citizen, you're only obligated to uphold your end of the bargain, which is Common Law (don't break the 3 rules above!). Only government officials are bound by the Constitution in its entirety, because they must pledge the oath that's written in the Constitution!!
  11. #31  
    <<merged>>
    Just call me Berd.
  12. #32  
    Smoke spice instead? Its legal XD
  13. #33  
    I applaud California and Oregon for putting these initiatives on the ballot for November. They are leading the way, and hopefully other states, along with the Federal Government will follow suit. In the coming months I'm guessing that those opposed to legalization will be using the media to keep the myth alive about how bad marijuanna is for you blah blah. Meanwhile they will hide the fact that it's the use of legal prescription drugs kills more people per year than all illegal drugs combined (including cocaine, heroine etc.). Lets not even bring in alcohol..

    Good luck in your battle for not just legalization, but a battle for states rights.
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  14. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by pattavino View Post
    this is a tough one to crack. MJ is considered A class a drug, which means it has no know medical uses. On the other hand cocain is a class b drug and can be used for medical purposes. When alcohol was prohibited they did not have a class for it. It would be easier in the eyes of the Feds to legalize cocain because of it's class. Believe me I am behind legalization 100% and am a medical user. Unless the feds change the class of the drug there is no way for them to legalize it. I hope this thing in California works.
    Ignorance is bliss, yeah?
  15. thornev's Avatar
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    #35  
    I don't give a crap about anyone's arguments regarding how it helps or hurts people. It's a plant and it's my right to smoke what I want. I should be able to grow it, buy it, sell it (no, not to people too young to take care of themselves), keep it to myself, share it with my friends or whatever. As far as I'm concerned grass is WAY less harmful than alcohol and as long as alcohol is legal, grass should be too. thorne
  16. Micael's Avatar
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       #36  
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric1987 View Post
    Ignorance is bliss, yeah?
    ??
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  17. Micael's Avatar
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       #37  
    California Governor Signs Marijuana Decriminalization Bill

    by Phillip Smith, October 1, 2010

    California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Thursday signed into law a bill that decriminalizes the possession of up to one ounce of marijuana. The bill reduces simple possession from a misdemeanor to an infraction.

    Currently, small-time pot possession is "semi-decriminalized" in California. There is no possible jail sentence and a maximum $100 fine. But because possession is a misdemeanor, people caught with pot are "arrested," even if that means only they are served a notice to appear, and they must appear before a court.

    That has happened to more than a half million Californians in the last decade, and more than 60,000 last year alone. Every one of them required a court appearance, complete with judge and prosecutor. That costs the cash-strapped state money it desperately needs.

    Under the bill signed today, SB 1449, by Sen. Mark Leno (D-San Francisco), pot possession will be treated like a traffic ticket. The fine will remain at $100, and there will be no arrest record.

    In a signing statement, Schwarzenegger said he opposed decriminalization for personal use—and threw in a gratuitous jab at Proposition 19, the tax and regulate marijuana legalization initiative—but that the state couldn't afford the status quo.

    "I am signing this measure because possession of less than an ounce of marijuana is an infraction in everything but name," said Schwarzenegger. "The only difference is that because it is a misdemeanor, a criminal defendant is entitled to a jury trial and a defense attorney. In this time of drastic budget cuts, prosecutors, defense attorneys, law enforcement, and the courts cannot afford to expend limited resources prosecuting a crime that carries the same punishment as a traffic ticket."

    "Gov. Schwarzenegger deserves credit for sparing the state's taxpayers the cost of prosecuting minor pot offenders," said California NORML director Dale Gieringer. "Californians increasingly recognize that the war on marijuana is a waste of law enforcement resources."

    The law goes into effect January 1. Even if Prop 19 passes in November, it leaves in place misdemeanor charges for smoking in public or in the presence of minors. Those misdemeanors would become infractions under the new law.

    Sacramento, CA
    United States
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  18. #38  
    At some point, I imagine the laws on tobacco smoking will end up being more restrictive than cannibis smoking.
  19. #39  
    This is awesome. So glad we won't be clogging up our courts with this BS.
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  20. Micael's Avatar
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       #40  
    I'm wondering though, how will this impact federal law in California? Here's a quote from legalmatch.com:

    "What Amount of Marijuana Do I Have to Carry to Violate Federal Law?
    ANY amount. Unlike many states, the federal law does not qualify possession by amount. Possession of any amount of marijuana (even a single marijuana cigarette) is punishable by up to a year in jail and a fine of $1,000 on the first offense. The second offense carries a 15-day mandatory sentence, and can be extended for as long as two years in prison. Any possession after that gets a 90-day to three year prison term, and a $5,000 fine. (It should also be noted that distribution of a small amount of marijuana for no money is usually treated as simple possession)."
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
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