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  1.    #1  
    This is as off-topic as it gets. Living with a new roommate for the first winter and I was curious as to what you all set your thermostats to in the winter when its like 30F outside? The roommate and I don't quite see eye-to-eye and I won't say how so because I don't want to bias responses.
  2. #2  
    30F.............Yikes , But if I lived in those extremes I guess I'd keep it around 65
  3. #3  
    Wife keeps it at 76, I prefer 72. Wife wins.
  4. #4  
    Work as a HVAC engineer at A/E firm. Regardless of the outside temperature, 68 - 70 deg F is typcial setpoint for winter and 75 deg F for summer. However, it heavily depends on personal preference, cost of energy and of course the thinning ice cap of the poles. Start from 70 and adjust as what or who takes more priority. 65 deg F is quite typical indoor temp in cold climate only because of economic reason (1 deg F difference in temperature makes a couple % difference in heating bill without setback temperature). BTW government buildig thermostats are set 68 deg in winter and 75 deg in summer.
  5.    #5  
    Ok, thanks guys.

    I consider 65-70 a reasonable range, 65 being on the colder side of comfort but it's what my folks have their house set to at home, mainly because its a poorly insulated 90 yr old home. I think 68 is about perfect.

    My roommate has been cranking the 'stat up to 74-75 range, and where the thermostat is located is in a long hall, on an interior wall (to our bathroom, which is cold because of a window that doesn't lock). So I'm fairly sure the rest of the house is about 78. How do you tell someone that it's pretty unreasonable expect to be comfortable wearing gym shorts and an undershirt, and no socks in December?

    I'm not excited to see our electric bill this month...and February is where it typically peaks.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by cpcrook View Post
    This is as off-topic as it gets. Living with a new roommate for the first winter and I was curious as to what you all set your thermostats to in the winter when its like 30F outside? The roommate and I don't quite see eye-to-eye and I won't say how so because I don't want to bias responses.
    The house I bought is all baseboard electric heat. The first thing I did when I moved in was to put in timed thermostats. My house is always comfy, and my electric bills stay low. Not sure what you use, but timed thermostats are a great way to keep yourself comfortable while saving on the heating bills.

    I do 70-75 in the room I am in, and 65 elsewhere and when sleeping. Works well for me, and keeps the bills down. One advantage to baseboard is you can independently control the heat in every room of the house.
  7. #7  
    Just a few thoughts as I am also and HVAC engineer. I do agree with dysung72 on typical set points. Here are my thoughts. First, most thermostats have a set point dead band and most being standard to be 2 degrees (this can be adjusted). What this means is that if your thermostat is set to 68 degrees it will turn on the heat until it reaches 70 degrees and shut off. Likewise, it will wait until it gets down to 66 degrees to kick the heat back on. That being said, we have our set point at 67 degrees with a 2 degree dead band. We also use a 5 degree set back during the day when we are not home. So the temperature is maintained at 62 during the day. A programmable thermostat is easiest to accomplish this but it can be done without one as well. Set backs are a substantial way to reduce your heating and cooling bills. Of course, this only works if you are not there during the day. One thing to note that my roommates have made the mistake of is that if you come home and it is still set back to 62 degrees or whatever, there is no reason at all to raise the temperature up to 78 degrees or something to make it warm up "quicker". This does not happen and all it does is make you forget to turn it back down costing you money. Heating units will give you all the heat it can whenever the temperature is not met. The higher set point means nothing to it.

    Second, if you are worried about your energy bill there are a few inexpensive items that can save you some money and a few tips that are pretty easy. Number one, make sure all openings to the exterior are properly sealed. If you are renting, potentially get your landlord to seal them if they aren't. Probably the most expensive item in residential applications for heating and cooling is infiltration (outdoor air getting inside the home). Some easy items to purchase yourself is weatherstripping from Home Depot or some place like that. I believe you can get a roll of it with an adhesive back for relatively low cost. Place some in the jambs of any or all exterior windows and doors, especially any that have visible openings outside, i.e. light is able to show through.

    Third, replace any incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent or halogen lights. They will use less energy.

    Fourth, any electrical outlets that are on an exterior wall need to be addressed. They can be insulated to help with cost as well. Only do this if your exterior wall has insulation. You can buy little pieces of foam designed to be placed behind the faceplate of the electrical outlets that will improve your insulation.

    Fifth, if you have a freezer and you don't typically keep it filled with items, fill it with cardboard or a big block of ice. Cardboard is probably easier. This is because when you do open the freezer, anything other that air will store the cold better. Additionally, this means that it will lose its cold slower through the walls of the freezer.

    That is all I can think of for now but as you can probably tell, I am very passionate about energy efficiency in the HVAC world. Good luck with convincing your roommate because I know that can probably be a pain.
  8. #8  
    I keep mine @ 68* in the winter but I have little kids or it would be more like 66*.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by cpcrook View Post
    This is as off-topic as it gets. Living with a new roommate for the first winter and I was curious as to what you all set your thermostats to in the winter when its like 30F outside? The roommate and I don't quite see eye-to-eye and I won't say how so because I don't want to bias responses.
    Well, considering that it's rarely 30F outside here, I can't say. I have a programmable thermostat with automatic switching. Settings are:
    5am-7am - 70F/76F
    7am-5pm - 64F/78F
    5pm-5am - 68F/76F

    I used to set the cool point to 82F during the day before we had ferrets, but they don't cope well with temps that high. If I only had a static thermostat, I'd go with 68F for heat and 76F for cool.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  10. #10  
    I keep mine @ 68. However the crappy hvac design of the house we are renting means there is always a big diff in temp between up and down stairs. So 68 downstairs where the thermostat is is 74 up stairs.

    so I close some of the vents to help adjust the temp and reverse the fans where needed.

    hvac is dumb cause the lower floor intake is on the ceiling (which take all the downstairs heat during summer) while the upstairs intake is close to the floor (which grabs all the cold air during summer). So whovere designed this house is a ****** for not putting in more than 1 thermostat unit.

    le sigh

    so I feel your pain and hope yo to can come to terms. Also if they are always cold... Tell them to exercise and that should help them "warm up"
  11. #11  
    My suggestion is to get those shrinking plastic window cover kits for any and all windows...especially the one in the bathroom that doesn't seal. It can also help to have a heavy pair of curtains or even a heavy blanket hanging in front of any large windows that let in a lot of cold air. Weather stripping around any doors letting in cold air is also a must--if you can see light around the door, you need to get some weather stripping.

    Try talking to your roommate about the economics of the situation. Is you roommate paying his own bills or are his parents? If you're paying your own way and he is being supported by his parents, argue that it isn't fair that he not consider your financial burden when he refuses to wear some long pants and a sweatshirt around the house.
  12. #12  
    I keep it at 21C (about 72F) year round. I just switch the system from A/C to heat depending on the season.
  13. #13  
    My office sets the temp at whatever the loudest woman wants it at...

    At home, it's a more reasonable temp because my wife is not insane like the lady at work.
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  14. #14  
    60 below zero, or 60 above zero - Thermostat stays at 65 all year round. Touch it and die!
  15. Micael's Avatar
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    #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by ryleyinstl View Post
    I keep it at 21C (about 72F) year round. I just switch the system from A/C to heat depending on the season.
    Wow! How much do you spend on carbon offsets to compensate for such wanton waste?
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
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    #16  
    I keep mine at 294 K, give or take. I switched to Kelvin back in the 70's when we entered the little ice age and just never switched back.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    Wow! How much do you spend on carbon offsets to compensate for such wanton waste?
    The thermostat is programed to save energy at night and when we are not home but the "occupied" setting is 21C....that is normal room temperature, I'm not sure what the problem is with that?

    You're going to really freak out when you learn that our house has 2 central furnace/AC units, one for the first floor and one for the second.
    Last edited by ryleyinstl; 12/18/2009 at 11:46 AM.
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by ryleyinstl View Post
    ... You're going to really freak out when you learn that our house has 2 central furnace/AC units, one for the first floor and one for the second.
    @ryleyinstl,
    I've been pondering this for a year and I'm still not freaked out. (I must be a zombie.)
    I'm both super! ... and a doer!
  19. #19  
    tell her if the thermostat goes above 72 it will throw up, thats right throw up not blow up
  20. #20  
    My place in winter is usually 68 day (when home) and 60-62 (at night)
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