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  1. djmcgee's Avatar
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    #21  
    Certainly cell phones are not needed by kids.

    My two kids have had cell phones for all of 4 months now. They do have unlimited texting and access to the internet. We chose to give them phones because we chose to do that, not because of peer pressure or for other reasons. We like to be in touch with them when we are not around.

    Similarly, we have never had one of our kids stranded somewhere.

    What I am saying is that it is your choice and to ask a question like that on a forum and then argue with the responses isn't helping you.

    As an aside, the rule in my house is that everything in the house and anything that I purchased is MINE and I always have the right to read, review, look, dig through whatever I like. My house is not a democracy and though I respect my children's thoughts and opinions it is my house as I am the parent. I don't tolerate drugs, ****ography, hate, etc. My feelings won't stop things from happening but at least they know I do have the right (and will exercise it) to look anywhere in their rooms or on their phone/computer accounts.

    Opinion on
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by ryleyinstl View Post
    This should likely be moved here...http://forums.precentral.net/off-topic/
    So moved.

    - Craig
  3. #23  
    Personally, my kids don't "need" cell phones, but I NEED them to have them. My schedule and theirs is constantly fluctuating so the cell is a must so we can all coordinate the where's and when.

    My oldest will tell you that he had a heck of a lot more freedom when he didn't have a cell than now that he does. He knows if he's not at school he better pick up the phone or text back asap or he'll be grounded.

    I'm also blessed in that my boys never went over their text allowance. The first year they had a cell I gave them a junk phone with limited minutes and texts. They were told if they could be responsible with that they would be upgraded. Both passed with flying colors and now they have better phones with unlimited text messaging. The eldest (17) also has internet access, but not the youngest who is 14.
  4.    #24  
    Let me be clear, I fully intend to get my kid's phones at some point. I have no problem with high school kid's having cell phones my question goes back again to an 11 year having a cell phone. I really can't think of a responsible scenario where you don't know where an 11 year old kid is and out somewhere without some kind of adult supervision.

    Not on topic but just to prove that I'm not just some nervous ninny.
    I understand teaching kid's how to use tools responsibly, I'm sure I'm in the minority, but I have exposed my children to guns, I take my 13 year old out to the shooting range and have taught him how to properly handle a .22 and a shotgun, but I don't give him access to the guns unsupervised. I store the guns at an off-site locked location outside our home. I would prefer him to understand and be responsible with them, than to find himself at someone's house and have the urge to play with one out of curiosity.
    Palm V > samsung i500> treo 650 > treo 755p> Centro> Pre
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by LonghornTreo View Post
    Let me be clear, I fully intend to get my kid's phones at some point. I have no problem with high school kid's having cell phones my question goes back again to an 11 year having a cell phone. I really can't think of a responsible scenario where you don't know where an 11 year old kid is and out somewhere without some kind of adult supervision.

    Not on topic but just to prove that I'm not just some nervous ninny.
    I understand teaching kid's how to use tools responsibly, I'm sure I'm in the minority, but I have exposed my children to guns, I take my 13 year old out to the shooting range and have taught him how to properly handle a .22 and a shotgun, but I don't give him access to the guns unsupervised. I store the guns at an off-site locked location outside our home. I would prefer him to understand and be responsible with them, than to find himself at someone's house and have the urge to play with one out of curiosity.
    Do your children go anywhere without you ? If so , you could think of the cell as a life line.
  6. #26  
    My 8 yr old has one. At first it was just a good idea because on my sprint plan I could have 3 phones. My wife and I had one, then the Pre came out. I bought the Pre with the third plan (just so I could get it at the new customer price, I also got a $75 refer a friend check too) and gave my son the phone I had. I didn't show him how to use anything but the quick call feature. At first it was so he could call if he got into trouble or really needed us (no calling friends). Now I have a GPS feature where I can track where he's at, when he got there and notifies me when he gets to school. There was racial issue he had on the bus with another kid. He called me after he tried talking to the bus driver. I missed his call, but I could here in my message from him what was going on. Needless to say Me, the Principle, the kids parents and the bus driver had a little talk and got things taken care of. All I'm saying is, the phone for your kids doesn't have to really be for them or their liking, maybe like for me, it's a upgrade for the safety for your family. My sons never missed used it or showed it off, because we've talked about what it's for.
  7. jye75's Avatar
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    #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by Colonel Angus View Post
    Do your children go anywhere without you ? If so , you could think of the cell as a life line.
    Absolutely agree with this... especially when walking to/from a friend's house. Besides, it's not like curbside payphones are an abundance anymore, and those that do still exist, you may be lucky to find one that works. Heck, I even text my daughter when we are in the house, if I don't want to go find her or yell through the house.
  8.    #28  
    They go places without me, but not places without some type of adult involved that I could contact if necessary. I'm not one that just drops my kid's off at the mall.
    Palm V > samsung i500> treo 650 > treo 755p> Centro> Pre
  9. jye75's Avatar
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    #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by LonghornTreo View Post
    They go places without me, but not places without some type of adult involved that I could contact if necessary. I'm not one that just drops my kid's off at the mall.
    Well then, as long as your children are always with an adult, then you probably have no reason to purchase cellphones for them. For the rest of us, having cellphones for our kids is a different, more preferred umbilical cord that doesn't require the time or resources of another adult.

    p.s. I don't know many responsible parents who WOULD just drop their 10-13 year old off at the mall. That's the key, being responsible with kids... mine having a cellphone is a part of that.
  10. #30  
    I believe we are at the cusp of the new age here - the technological immersion. Whereas I did not get a cell phone until I was in my 30's, my youngest (13) just got his last summer. Technology is becoming more deeply integrated in our lives, and so we
    need to be on the forefront as it affects our children.

    You are asking about 11-13 year-olds - this is your decision, as a parent, but one not to be made lightly. I would agree that at this point, they don't need full internet access, and a dumb phone would be better for them (do they still make those?) I appreciate that my son can call me when his school bus is 10 minutes away so that I can get there to pick him up. (The school buses are notoriously unreliable in our area.)

    We used the cell phone to teach my oldest child about money and budgeting - we got her a "pay as you go" plan when she was 16, and gave her a $20 card every three months. She could buy her own cards as she wanted, but we required her to always have enough time for her to call us or us to call her in emergencies. She got very proficient at budgeting her time, and at deciding which friends could have her number and which ones couldn't.

    Use this as a learning time. Make the ground rules clear, and stick to them. You have a right to see who they have called and what text messages they have. You don't want to be overbearing about it, but technology makes abuse easier, so be a good parent and help them to make the right decisions.
  11. #31  
    kids don't need a cell phone until they can drive. That is when I got one and the same with my sisters. I think that is the perfect age. If you as a parent don't know where your 11 yr old is, then perhaps you should be reconsidering your parenting methods. All schools have phone students can use as well as computers to email. But a cell phone for an 11 yr old kid is ludacris!
  12. #32  
    One very simple reason for giving adolescent students cell phones, other than ease of reaching them and instructing them in the use of emerging technology, was very simple in my house: it was cheaper to go all cellular than to have a landline in the house.
    Everything's Amazing and Nobody's Happy

    Treo600 --> Treo650-->PPC6700-->Treo700P-->Treo755P-->Treo800W --> Touch Pro-->Palm Pre --> EVO 4G
  13. Micael's Avatar
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    #33  
    My 13 year has had a cell phone for 2 years now, and it's been a blessing. No issues, what so ever.
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  14.    #34  
    Well then where are your kids that an adult isn't present, either a coach, teacher, etc. What activities do you have where you leave your kid and no adults are around? I'm talking an 11 year old here, not a high schooler
    Palm V > samsung i500> treo 650 > treo 755p> Centro> Pre
  15. #35  
    Of course, back in the day, there were working *pay* telephones around for kids to use to call home when scheduling changed. Not today.

    I gave my kids cellphones when their schedules started keeping them after school for unpredictable hours and they were places where, if things changed, they couldn't easily reach us other ways. Not smartphones, and no txting, but cellphones. {Jonathan}
    Prof. Jonathan I. Ezor
    Writer, PreCentral
    Past Palm Real Reviewer
    @webOSquire on Twitter
  16. #36  
    Quote Originally Posted by LonghornTreo View Post
    Well then where are your kids that an adult isn't present, either a coach, teacher, etc. What activities do you have where you leave your kid and no adults are around?
    Mine, believe it or not, went out to play with friends at times. Of course, now they are on their computers / video games constantly, and probably couldn't find the backyard without Google Maps.
    Everything's Amazing and Nobody's Happy

    Treo600 --> Treo650-->PPC6700-->Treo700P-->Treo755P-->Treo800W --> Touch Pro-->Palm Pre --> EVO 4G
  17. #37  
    Quote Originally Posted by LonghornTreo View Post
    Well then where are your kids that an adult isn't present, either a coach, teacher, etc. What activities do you have where you leave your kid and no adults are around?
    Why must you burden the coach/teacher with being the telephone booth for all surrounding kids? Will you reimburse the teacher for the minutes your child uses? {Jonathan}
    Prof. Jonathan I. Ezor
    Writer, PreCentral
    Past Palm Real Reviewer
    @webOSquire on Twitter
  18. #38  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    The world that most of us grew up in was different.
    I think the perception of the world is certainly different, but some of that perception may be changing, as people separate perceived dangers from the reality of the world. This article has some interesting points: Helicopter Parents: The Backlash Against Overparenting - TIME

    For example:

    ...too many parents, says Skenazy, have the math all wrong. Refusing to vaccinate your children, as millions now threaten to do in the case of the swine flu, is statistically reckless; on the other hand, there are no reports of a child ever being poisoned by a stranger handing out tainted Halloween candy, and the odds of being kidnapped and killed by a stranger are about 1 in 1.5 million. When parents confront you with "How can you let him go to the store alone?," she suggests countering with "How can you let him visit your relatives?" (Some 80% of kids who are molested are victims of friends or relatives.) Or ride in the car with you? (More than 430,000 kids were injured in motor vehicles last year.) "I'm not saying that there is no danger in the world or that we shouldn't be prepared," she says. "But there is good and bad luck and fate and things beyond our ability to change. The way kids learn to be resourceful is by having to use their resources." Besides, she says with a smile, "a 100%-safe world is not only impossible. It's nowhere you'd want to be."
    Everything's Amazing and Nobody's Happy

    Treo600 --> Treo650-->PPC6700-->Treo700P-->Treo755P-->Treo800W --> Touch Pro-->Palm Pre --> EVO 4G
  19. bvinci1's Avatar
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    #39  
    With the advent of cell phones, there are fewer and fewer pay phones just sitting around waiting on a customer. So the available landlines for a kid to use are just not as abundant anymore.

    There are a lot of phones that limited or no internet access, and there are providers that can filter what content can make to a specific line. But the fact is 30 years ago my mom couldnt stop me from collecting playboy and your not going to stop your childs curiosities with adult oriented material.

    Should you be on guard: YES. And maintaining involvement with the usage of technology in your childs life is essential so that they utilize the technology not get used by it.
  20.    #40  
    Yeah, I would if it ever came to that. I can remember I time yet that my kids have had to call me from someone else's cell phone because of a scheduling change. Seems like all our coaches either send out and email, same with the school if a bus is running late. It seems like some are painting me as the overprotective one, yet I'm not the one who needs 24/7 contact with my child. I drop them off at an activity and come back to pick them up when it's over. I can't think of any teacher or coach that would have a problem contacting a parent in the event of an emergency.
    Palm V > samsung i500> treo 650 > treo 755p> Centro> Pre
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