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  1.    #1  
    Just got me a cable connection. I have read (very little) about firewalls, and know nothing about them. I guess my question is, can anyone recommend one or explain why I do or don't need one? Thanks,
    Sterling
  2. #2  
    Linksys or SMB. I have to go or I would write more, so connect with my mind and read my thoughts.
  3. #3  
    The question is not whether you need a firewall, it is whether or not you choose software or hardware.

    I purchased a LinkSYS 4Port Router that is awesome. It does it all, in addition to being my FireWall. It also acts as my DHCP server, meaning I do not have to deal with setting up one of my PC's as a server.

    The coolest feature is MAC Address Cloning. If your Cable Provider is like mine, they record the MAC Address of your NIC and Cable Modem. In theory, this prevents home networking. The LinkSYS allows you to configure it so the MAC Address of your NIC gets broadcast out regardless of which machine is being used.

    I picked mine up at BestBuy for $79.99. It has been worth every penny.

    You can always go here and test how vulnerable you are.
    In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. JOHN 14:2
  4. #4  
    If you don't get yourself a hardware firewall, at the VERY least go an download ZoneAlarm. it resides on your computer and sets itself up very well. it's fully functional, free, and easily customized. it's not going to stop anybody with an ounce of determination, but that also means it stops 90% of people who'd want into joe schmoe's computer.

    http://www.zonealarm.com/zap26_za_grid.html
  5.    #5  
    Originally posted by GSR13
    The question is not whether you need a firewall, it is whether or not you choose software or hardware.

    I purchased a LinkSYS 4Port Router that is awesome. It does it all, in addition to being my FireWall. It also acts as my DHCP server, meaning I do not have to deal with setting up one of my PC's as a server.

    The coolest feature is MAC Address Cloning. If your Cable Provider is like mine, they record the MAC Address of your NIC and Cable Modem. In theory, this prevents home networking. The LinkSYS allows you to configure it so the MAC Address of your NIC gets broadcast out regardless of which machine is being used.

    I picked mine up at BestBuy for $79.99. It has been worth every penny.

    You can always go here and test how vulnerable you are.
    I passed these tests, but would like to hook my kids PC up so they can play online games and my laptop so I can get my Notes a little faster. So a network router acts as a firewall - sounds good to me, about the MAC cloning - what service does this? I got Roadrunner if it makes any difference. Thanks,
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by dampeoples


    I passed these tests, but would like to hook my kids PC up so they can play online games and my laptop so I can get my Notes a little faster. So a network router acts as a firewall - sounds good to me, about the MAC cloning - what service does this? I got Roadrunner if it makes any difference. Thanks,
    What OS are you using?

    My service provider is Adelphia.
    In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. JOHN 14:2
  7.    #7  
    Originally posted by GSR13


    What OS are you using?

    My service provider is Adelphia.
    I'm using X, my kids 98 and the laptop is NT. X will be my main concern, though. If you really want to hack into the PC, I don't mind, there are lots of kids games there! If I could, I'd hook the Prism up too (is there a wireless module for this, coupled with an Airport?) Thanks,
    Sterling
  8. #8  
    GSR13 offered good advice. Most routers today are being built with web-admin tools, so it's really easy to hook one up and configure it as a firewall.

    Hardware Firewalls are always more secure than software ones.

    Some of the fancier routers/firewalls allow you to do additional things like filter web content and such for the kids...if you are into do that type of thing.
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by dampeoples


    I'm using X, my kids 98 and the laptop is NT. X will be my main concern, though. If you really want to hack into the PC, I don't mind, there are lots of kids games there! If I could, I'd hook the Prism up too (is there a wireless module for this, coupled with an Airport?) Thanks,
    Sterling
    The reason I asked about your OS is because you were so secure. I am sure that OSX is similar to XP, in that it has built-in protection of its own. WinXP comes with Internet Connection Firewall Software. I actually had to disable it in order to see the other PC on my Network. I am sure X uses something similar.

    I would still recommend one of the LinkSYS units. It really could not be easier to setup. Considering it does all your DHCP, you really have nothing to do. Some very basic configuration and that is all done via your browser.

    You might even find that RoadRunner does the same thing with the MAC Address, but I personally do not know. Any RR users who can verify?
    In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. JOHN 14:2
  10.    #10  
    Thanks GSR, i'll be off to Bestbuy soon!
  11. #11  
    GSR13:

    Do you if you can combine DHCP and Static IPs with the Linksys?

    I currently need to have two static IPs for our servers, but would like to stick them behind a firewall if possible. I then have 5 other machines that we'd like to set up with DHCP.
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by homer
    GSR13:

    Do you if you can combine DHCP and Static IPs with the Linksys?

    I currently need to have two static IPs for our servers, but would like to stick them behind a firewall if possible. I then have 5 other machines that we'd like to set up with DHCP.
    Good question, and one I cannot answer off hand. You can certainly go with Static IP's, but I question whether you can do both.

    Go to LinkSYS and take a look at the User Guide. The link above will take you to the same Router I have.
    In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. JOHN 14:2
  13. #13  
    A question for anyone...

    Looking at the LinkSys router, seems like a good device. However, my fiancée has DSL and requires a "dial-in" program running on her Win98 box. If the router is sitting between all computers and the DSL modem, is it possible to get the router to run the dial-in program?
  14. #14  
    Homer:

    For the record, you can use Static IP's and DHCP combined. In an effort to iron out some really odd problems with XP losing its connection, I have done this. I now have three machines configured to run DHCP and one machine using Static IP.

    You just have to assign an IP Address that falls outside of the DHCP Range, which is determined by you anyway.

    Juggler:

    It looks as though you can use the LinkSYS Router to work with DSL that uses DialUp and a UserName and Password.

    More than likely, the DSL provider is using PPPoE. When setting up the LinkSYS, you can adjust the WAN Settings to PPPoE and you would enter the ISP's UserName and Password.

    If interested, download the UserGuide that I linked to above and check out Chapter 8.
    In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. JOHN 14:2
  15.    #15  
    Ok, I got an Airport setup, with a hard-wired iMac and a wireless iBook, does this constitute a firewall? Thanks,
    Sterling
  16. #16  
    Originally posted by Juggler
    A question for anyone...

    Looking at the LinkSys router, seems like a good device. However, my fiancée has DSL and requires a "dial-in" program running on her Win98 box. If the router is sitting between all computers and the DSL modem, is it possible to get the router to run the dial-in program?
    Good question, my cable modem works the same, thats why I held off buying a hardware Router/firewall...

    As a workaround would it be possible to setup 2 TCP/IP configs on the same NIC? i.e. can I setup the NIC to connect to the internet AND also set it up for LAN config?
    That way I could setup a proxy server and browse on all machines on the LAN.. Right now I can only have 1 machine connected to the net at once... not really a problem since my wife is the only person in the house and she's not really an internet addict like me...
    <IMG WIDTH="200" HEIGHT="50" SRC=http://www.visorcentral.com/images/visorcentral.gif> (ex)VisorCentral Discussion Moderator
    Do files get embarrassed when they get unzipped?
  17. #17  
    Originally posted by dampeoples
    Ok, I got an Airport setup, with a hard-wired iMac and a wireless iBook, does this constitute a firewall? Thanks,
    Sterling
    I would think so, but I am not entirely certain on Airport Configuration.

    As I understand it, the iMac is hard-wired and has the Airport Base connected. The iBook has an Airport Card. I would assume you would need some type of Firewall between the iMac and the Web. Considering the iBook goes through the iMac to get out, it would still go through the Firewall.

    If this is how it works, and you plan on networking via Airport, you might consider a Software Firewall on your iMac.

    Of course, you might also find someone with more knowledge of the Airport setup to assist.
    In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. JOHN 14:2
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by ToolkiT

    Good question, my cable modem works the same, thats why I held off buying a hardware Router/firewall...

    As a workaround would it be possible to setup 2 TCP/IP configs on the same NIC? i.e. can I setup the NIC to connect to the internet AND also set it up for LAN config?
    That way I could setup a proxy server and browse on all machines on the LAN.. Right now I can only have 1 machine connected to the net at once... not really a problem since my wife is the only person in the house and she's not really an internet addict like me...
    About 04 posts up I posted this to Juggler:

    "It looks as though you can use the LinkSYS Router to work with DSL that uses DialUp and a UserName and Password.

    More than likely, the DSL provider is using PPPoE. When setting up the LinkSYS, you can adjust the WAN Settings to PPPoE and you would enter the ISP's UserName and Password.

    If interested, download the UserGuide that I linked to above and check out Chapter 8."

    I would assume your Cable Modem works in similar fashion. If so, you set-up the Router to Dial-in to your ISP and establish the connection. This would mean any device connected to the router should have both a LAN Connection to your Home Network and also an Internet Connection.

    Not really sure what you mean by setting up two connections to one NIC, though.

    I really advise taking a look at the User Guide on the LinkSYS site. They are many different ways to configure it.

    You might also try looking at DSLReports forum. They have Forums on many different ISP's and lots of threads concerning the use of the LinkSYS Routers.

    In addition, you can do a search on Google for other Broadband forums or your specific Cable Provider and see what turns up.
    In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. JOHN 14:2
  19.    #19  
    Originally posted by GSR13


    I would think so, but I am not entirely certain on Airport Configuration.

    As I understand it, the iMac is hard-wired and has the Airport Base connected. The iBook has an Airport Card. I would assume you would need some type of Firewall between the iMac and the Web. Considering the iBook goes through the iMac to get out, it would still go through the Firewall.

    If this is how it works, and you plan on networking via Airport, you might consider a Software Firewall on your iMac.

    Of course, you might also find someone with more knowledge of the Airport setup to assist.
    The iBook goes through the Airport, the new Airport has an out port for connecting a computer, so it goes through the modem, then Airport, then hard wired to iMac and the iBook just communicates to the Airport. I read some stuff on Apple's page, but didn't understand it.
  20. #20  
    Originally posted by Juggler
    A question for anyone...

    Looking at the LinkSys router, seems like a good device. However, my fiancée has DSL and requires a "dial-in" program running on her Win98 box. If the router is sitting between all computers and the DSL modem, is it possible to get the router to run the dial-in program?
    Jugler,

    Your Girlfreinds DSL probably uses something like WinPoet to make the connection.

    With a Linksys, you no longer need the program. It takes care of the connecting to the provider.

    BTW, I used me Linksys with Verizon DSL. Now I use it with road runner.


    Toolkit,

    You can use the computer as a gateway with two nics and the proper software. The only issue is that that PC always needs to be on if you want the other to get access. Dont worket a firewall.

    Having said that I don't see why you would be able to use a linksys (or other router) instead. Like GSR13 said, head over to DSl Reports and see if if they have any info on your broadband provider.
    Felipe
    On the road to 5,000 posts
    Life is what happens between Firmware releases.

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