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  1.    #1  
    Well, I think the family is headed to London this spring for our vacation. Me, the wife, and a 7 month old.

    What should we do there? Obviously, with the 7 month old, we'll be staying away from the night life and probably focusing on the site seeing. Is the underground easy enough to navigate? How about with a baby? Is Stonehenge worth the trip? Any hole-in-the-wall places we should venture out to?
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  2. #2  
    Sorry for a very unhelpful post but its ironic that I live 30 mins from London and when trying to help you the best thing I can think of is Playstation skatepark...

    The Tate art gallery is great but with a 7 month old it might not be so fun...

    The underground is VERY easy to navigate - very straightforward.

    You might like to goto the tower of London but i've never been so i wouldn't really know. Oh and the London eye is definately worth trying out.

    Hope this might help... :-\
  3. #3  
    Check out Winchester Cathedral, Big Ben, Stone Henge. Save up money for food.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  4. #4  
    Westminster Abbey, Trafalgar Square, National Gallery.
    If you're into theatre, the National and the Royal Shakespeare Company's Barbican will both probably have something great on. But those are not exactly baby-friendly.
    If memory serves, Stonehenge is pretty far from London. I also remember reading something about access being kind of restricted now for environmental reasons, but I'm not sure if that's currently the case. VC members from that part of the world can set you straight about that.
    If you go to any rural areas, you're liable to be subject to a bit of extra scrutiny upon return because of the mad cow business. The official word there is that the crisis is over, but I somehow don't think that has filtered down to North American airport personnel.
    I went there 20 years ago, and it was a life-changing experience. I hope you have a great trip.
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by ****-richardson
    Check out Winchester Cathedral, Big Ben, Stone Henge. Save up money for food.
    And just remember that Big Ben isn't the clock _or_ the tower.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  6. #6  
    Oh yeah, I went to see MacBeth a short time ago at the globe (I'm pretty sure thats its name - my mind has gone blank, the shakespeare theatre thing anyway) and it was great. Not so sure if its baby friendly though...
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by Toby
    And just remember that Big Ben isn't the clock _or_ the tower.
    Really? I was unaware. What_is_it? I've also been meaning to ask of the_meaning_of the underscore - emphasis?
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by ****-richardson
    Really? I was unaware. What_is_it?
    It's the bell that chimes the hour.
    I've also been meaning to ask of the_meaning_of the underscore - emphasis?
    If you mean 'why do I use underscores', it's a carry-over from Usenet. I don't like using caps for emphasis, because I don't usually SHOUT. Asterisks imply action, e.g. *blink*. Underscores tend to highlight an important word in context without making it separate to me. I could use italics or bold, I suppose, but underscores are much easier and quicker to type usually than [ b ] [ / b ] or [ i ] [ / i ] and don't derail my train of thought.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by Toby
    It's the bell that chimes the hour.
    Ahhhh. Makes sense.
    If you mean 'why do I use underscores', it's a carry-over from Usenet. I don't like using caps for emphasis, because I don't usually SHOUT. Asterisks imply action, e.g. *blink*. Underscores tend to highlight an important word in context without making it separate to me. I could use italics or bold, I suppose, but underscores are much easier and quicker to type usually than [ b ] [ / b ] or [ i ] [ / i ] and don't derail my train of thought.
    Wow. You don't screw around, do you?
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  10.    #10  
    Hey...thanks for all of the tips.

    In regards to Stonehenge, I, too, thought that was now closed to the public.

    g_scream: I was recently told that London is having serious flooding problems at the moment. Is that true?
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  11. #11  
    I thought I heard that Stonehenge has been re-opened to the public. I'd check on it - it'd be worth the trip.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by ****-richardson
    Wow. You don't screw around, do you?
    Nope (in several contexts), and my wife loves me for it (in all of those contexts).
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  13. #13  
    Hi homer

    there's loads happening in london - I reckon if you could nip to Office Depot for me and snap up a deal or two I could be persuaded to part with the odd bit of advice ...

    The Tate art gallery is great but with a 7 month old it might not be so fun...
    I'd say go for it, it'll be worth it, I've been many a time - make it up to the kids by taking them to the National History Museum, last time I went they had this awesome archilogical dig set up - you couldn't get the kids out!

    the London Eyeis definately worth trying out.
    I'll second that. For 8 it's a snap - I still can't get over the vast amount of open space the Queens got out the back of Buckingham Palace while we all make do with box rooms and attic space You may need to book in advance if you're coming in late spring

    ...Save up money for food.
    What sort a food you into I can fire over some suggestions - not everything's extortionate, sure it's gonna be more expensive than over the pond but...

    As for the underground - load up the extended london pdb for metro and you'll be cruising. Don't forget, more than most underground systems, with all the lines crossing each other in the centre (zone 1), stations are closer together than you think - it's often quicker (and cleaner) to walk

    Another thing for the kids (you'll love it AND you can say you've been to the theatre in London) check out the Lion King at the Lyceum Theatre - go for aisle seats in the lower part of the theatre - oh and don't pay full whack, get to Leicester Square early in the morning for ticket releases and cancellations you snap up good seats for half the price...

    Finally (before I turn the board into a tourist information centre), on the stonehenge front - last I heard was that you could no longer get up close to touch the stones as they're all roped/fenced off. You can still go to it but this (IMHO) together with the price and the location take all the enjoyment out of the experience.

    Oh, just spotted you last post - it's pretty wet and windy at the moment (the eye closed this weekend) and parts of the UK are flooding - London's okay so far. Bring an umbrella, you'll get charged a fortune from street sellers if you get caught out

    Must dash, I've got to get the rowboat out and head to work
  14. #14  
    As far as I know there isn't any flooding, but I don't go there every day and since avantgo refuses to co-operate i'm not in touch with the news as much as i used to be!
  15. #15  
    Originally posted by g_scream
    ...but I don't go there every day and since avantgo refuses to co-operate ...
    hey, g_scream, nothing to do with silverlink or south-west trains then

    ...actually scrap that - let's just say public transport in general shall we (cheers red Ken)
  16.    #16  
    Ian:

    Thanks for the tips.

    A few of you mentioned the London Eye. What IS that? I saw it on a map. Just a big eye.

    As for the museums and such, that will definitely be on the list. The baby's only 6 months old, so, unless he's hungry, he's a pretty quiet kid (knock on wood...)

    This may be a really dumb question (or a great idea for a business ) but is it possible to rent nice strollers in London? I'm tempted to bring ours, but I'm not sure if it's worth the hassle.

    As for food, I can easily live on fish and chips for a week with the odd pint or two.
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  17. #17  
    The London Eye is this big wheel thing that is constantly moving. You get in and it gradually (very slowly) takes you round full circle. The idea is you get to see the whole of London and its beautiful views.

    Its not bad, you should definately check it out.
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by homer
    A few of you mentioned the London Eye. What IS that? I saw it on a map. Just a big eye.
    check out the website for pictures. It's effectively a huge ferris wheel some 450 feet tall which sits on the south bank of the River Thames almost opposite Westminister and Big Ben.

    Itwas built as part of the Millennium celebrations and initially was due to be dismantled after a couple of years, but now, after proving so successful looks set to stay - no guarantees though

    Oh and it seems they've bumped the price up to 9.50/5 (adults/kids) for 2002 probably due to the fact it is sponsored by British Airways who have failed to make a year on year profit for the first time since being privatised.
  19. #19  
    You might also go to Kensington Palace, Albert and Victoria Museum, The National War Museum and there are great walking tours. The Jack the Ripper tour was really interesting.

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