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  1.    #1  
    I just got a new computer with a 3Com 10/100 Ethernet card. I'm new to Ethernet, been stuck with "phoneline networking" and need to know something:

    I have another computer that needs an ethernet card. Does it matter whether I get a really cheap one, or does it pay to get a more expensive one? Any suggestions on good ones? Thanks.
    -Bernie

    "One word sums up probably the responsibility of any vice president, and that one word is 'to be prepared'.
    -Dan Quayle
  2. #2  
    As long as you use a "name brand" card you should be ok. I've used 3Com, Linksys, and Netlink cards and all have worked well. The one and only "generic" card I tried was nothing but trouble.

    At work, we use 3Com exclusively. Here at home, everything is Linksys, which is typically less expensive than 3Com.
    .
    .....
    MarkEagle
    .....<a href="http://discussion.treocentral.com/tcforum/index.php?s=">TreoCentral</a> | <a href="http://discussion.visorcentral.com/vcforum/index.php?s=">VisorCentral</a> Forum Moderator - Forum Guidelines
    .....Sprint PCS Treo 650
    .....God bless America, my home sweet home...
  3. #3  
    I think I paid $10.00 at BestBuy for my PCI EtherNet card. So far, it has been fine.

    I paid $79.99 for my 4Port LinkSYS Router/Switch and it has been awesome. I love this thing and highly recommend it.

    With my current setup, I have two PC's constantly connected. One runs WIN95 and one runs WIN98. I also connect my work ThinkPad up. It has WIN2000 and built-in EtherNet.

    So far, everything has ran without a hitch.
    In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. JOHN 14:2
  4. #4  
    Originally posted by GSR13
    I think I paid $10.00 at BestBuy for my PCI EtherNet card. So far, it has been fine.

    I paid $79.99 for my 4Port LinkSYS Router/Switch and it has been awesome. I love this thing and highly recommend it.

    With my current setup, I have two PC's constantly connected. One runs WIN95 and one runs WIN98. I also connect my work ThinkPad up. It has WIN2000 and built-in EtherNet.

    So far, everything has ran without a hitch.
    I recently set up a network in my house (with two computers and a laptop). All of it is LinkSYS including the 4Port Router. So far I had no problems. It is also really nice with a cable modem. This setup has worked very well.
    Did you just go near a burning hot river of lava or are you just happy to see me?
  5.    #5  
    2 more questions:

    1. Mark- What are some "generic" brands?

    2. I'm only hooking up 2 computers, and still have dial-up (wah!). Do I need a hub, or router, or anything like that?

    Thanks.
    -Bernie

    "One word sums up probably the responsibility of any vice president, and that one word is 'to be prepared'.
    -Dan Quayle
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by ernieba1
    Do I need a hub, or router, or anything like that?
    You can setup a peer-to-peer network without the need of a hub. With the cost of hubs relatively low, it probably makes more sense to use one. Either way, in order for both machines to have access to the internet, you'll need something like Internet Connection Sharing available in Win98SE and above, or another proxy-server application.

    As for the generic cards, I can't tell you much. The one I used was at the office and came bundled with some generic PC we bought. CompUSA's flyer today has a Linksys card on sale for 14.99 (SKU 118210). It's the same card I'm using here at home and I haven't had any problems with them.

    Also, check out Da LAN Tech. I've found a lot of useful information regarding networking there.
    .
    .....
    MarkEagle
    .....<a href="http://discussion.treocentral.com/tcforum/index.php?s=">TreoCentral</a> | <a href="http://discussion.visorcentral.com/vcforum/index.php?s=">VisorCentral</a> Forum Moderator - Forum Guidelines
    .....Sprint PCS Treo 650
    .....God bless America, my home sweet home...
  7.    #7  
    So, IF I got a hub, what would I do with it? Just have it around in case another computer showed up? If thats the case, I'd simply wait till another computer shows up :-). Also, we'll probably get the house wired by some computer person (I can't think of a better term), but until we get one, we'll just have cord lying across the floor. Are there any differences between cords? Better brands? OR am I being rediculous and they're all the same? Thanks alot.
    -Bernie

    "One word sums up probably the responsibility of any vice president, and that one word is 'to be prepared'.
    -Dan Quayle
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by ernieba1
    [...] until we get one, we'll just have cord lying across the floor. Are there any differences between cords? Better brands? OR am I being rediculous and they're all the same? Thanks alot.
    There is one important difference if you're not going to use a hub. You'll need to get a 'crossover' cable instead of a standard patch cable.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  9.    #9  
    HUH?
    -Bernie

    "One word sums up probably the responsibility of any vice president, and that one word is 'to be prepared'.
    -Dan Quayle
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by ernieba1
    HUH?
    If you buy a regular ethernet patch cable in a store, it's made to connect a PC to a hub. Connecting from a PC to a PC without a hub requires that the transmit and receive pairs be swapped ('crossed over') so that transmit on one side is receive on the other and vice versa instead of straight through (which is how a hub expects it). Luckily for you, this has become fairly ubiquitous for home networks, so you should be able to find a premade crossover cable in the same spot in the store as a regular straight-through patch cable.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  11. #11  
    Ethernet Cable is Cat-5. You can get a spool of it (1000 Feet) at Home Depot for about $60. Get a crimper and some ends and for about $80 you have enough cable to last you quite a while. You can just buy cables yourself, but they tend to add up real quickly.

    A cross-over cable is a Cat-5 cable with one of the ends reversed. It 'sort-of' acts as a hub between two machines.

    You may want to get a hub when you get a cable modem or DSL. Many of the 'modems' are actually routers that you can then just plug into the hub and have all of your machines connected without the need of internet-sharing software. (Note that some Cable modems are routers, but don't allow a netowork behind it...you may need to get your router in that case).

    Here's a quick tutorial on wiring ethernet:

    http://www.johnscloset.net/wiring/
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  12.    #12  
    Wow, great info, good link. I would've gotten all the wrong wiring stuff if it wasn't for you. Thanks.
    -Bernie

    "One word sums up probably the responsibility of any vice president, and that one word is 'to be prepared'.
    -Dan Quayle
  13. #13  
    Damn it, Damn it, Damn it. I wanted to be the one to teach Ernie about crossover cable.

    I've installed a couple dozen ethernet cards over the past five years, from brand names to no names. Never had a problem with any of them (though I do recommend keeping the driver disk someplace safe...in the event you need to re-install Windows and it doesn't recognize the driver for your network card you are in deep doo-doo; no internet). Sub-$15 cards generally don't include wake on LAN capability. Since no one except maybe Toby has ever used wake on LAN, save a couple bucks and get a regular old 10/100 card.
  14. #14  
    My network at my home (parents' house) is just two computers. I have a hub upstairs next to one computer with a cable running from that computer to it. Then another which runs from downstairs from the other computer and up into the room with the hub. Works quite well. My parents dont' have DSL or Cable yet so a router isn't needed but when they do finally get broadband i'll just have to switch out the hub for a router hub.

    Now at my apartment at school it's a little more complicated. I live with 4 other guys so we have 5 computers running on the network with a cable connection to share. We have the cable modem going into the router hub and from the router hub we have 3 computers plugged directly into it with a 50 foot cat5 running across the apartment into a hub that connects the other two computers. Works perfectly.

    This weekend i'll be adding a wireless access point to the whole mix so i can go online with my prism from anywhere.

    Our router is 3com, cable modem is motorola, my NIC is 3com, another is Linksys, 2 more are generic, and the final is whatever brand comes in G4's, with the WAP being Linksys. With all the different OS's (2 XP, 1 Win98SE, 1 Win98, 1 Mac OS X) and brands you'd think there'd be some issues between all these devices but so far there aren't.
    You know it's bad when your Calculus Professor uses the word "Unpossible"

    "It's a long way from my thoughts to what I'll say, It's a long, long way from paradise to where I am today." -Switchfoot, Home

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