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  1.    #1  
    Copyrighted Music

    I really don't listen to music. I normally listen to talk radio or sports radio. I know they have came down hard on music sharers. I fully support copyright laws. The artist needs to get paid for his/her music. I am glad they have stopped most of the file sharing.

    I think they have gone wacko with the fines. A single mother in Minnesota gets fined $1.92 million dollars for sharing 24 songs. Now there is a kid in Boston that they are going to prosecute for sharing 30 songs.

    The fine is so astronomical it makes no sense. What can this single mom do other than file for bankruptcy? This kid from Boston is bound to get a bigger fine.

    The article says. "The recording industry has recently changed its tactics in file sharing cases, preferring to settle quickly for much smaller amounts." Which I think is a good thing.

    BBC NEWS | Technology | File-sharer admits swapping songs
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  2. #2  
    The music industry is a bunch of lying mobsters that use intimidation and threats to force a few people to pay astronomical amounts of money to try to scare you into playing everything their way. Don't fool yourself into thinking artists make tons of money. When the RIAA gets money, the artists get jack squat. The record industry is failing, because they are producing CRAP and can't lose their old business models, because they have never added value and there is no room for them in the new artist produced music.

    I'm really happy to make sure the artists get paid. I'll never support an RIAA affiliated record company ever again. They have proved how much their care for their customers.
  3. groovy's Avatar
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    #3  
    I don't believe in file-sharing copyrighted material either but $150,000 is pretty exorbitant. The music industry knows the only thing they can hope to do is make examples out of the few people they catch, so they go for the big sums. That just makes them look like bullies even if they are in the right and the judgments are within the limits of the law. And, given that they've been peddling filth to kids for so long, I find it extremely difficult to feel any sympathy for them.
  4. #4  
    You better stop right now!!
    this verdict is ridiculous! the record labels were awarded $22,500 for each infringement! WHY?!!?

    Found on Boston Globe website:

    By Jonathan Saltzman, Globe Staff

    A federal jury today ordered a Boston University graduate student to pay four record labels $675,000 in damages for illegally downloading 30 songs and sharing them online, in only the second such lawsuit to go to trial.

    After deliberating about three hours, the jury in US District Court in Boston concluded that Joel Tenenbaum, a 25-year-old doctoral student in physics, ``willfully'' infringed on the copyrights of 30 songs, including Nirvana's ``Comes As You Are'' and Nine Inch Nails' ``The Perfect Drug.'' The jury award the record labels $22,500 for each infringement.

    Tenenbaum, who had unapologetically admitted from the witness stand that he had illegally downloaded and shared hundreds from 1999 to at least 2007 through peer-to-peer networks, said he was ``disappointed but not surprised'' in the award. ``But I am thankful that it wasn't millions,'' he said.

    The jury could have ordered him to pay as much as $150,000 for each of the 30 songs at issue in the lawsuit, or $4.5 million.

    Still, if the verdict stands, Tenenbaum said he will have to file for bankruptcy protection.

    His lead counsel, Harvard Law Professor Charles Nesson, said his client will appeal the judgment.

    The Recording Industry Association of America issued a statement praising the jury's ``recognition of the impact of illegal downloading on the music community. We appreciate that Mr. Tenenbaum finally acknowledged that artists and music companies deserve to be paid for their work.''
    Last edited by JohnnyKat; 07/31/2009 at 07:14 PM. Reason: Link not working
  5. cashen's Avatar
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    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyKat View Post
    You better stop right now!!
    this verdict is ridiculous! the record labels were awarded $22,500 for each infringement! WHY?!!?

    Found on Boston Globe website:

    By Jonathan Saltzman, Globe Staff

    A federal jury today ordered a Boston University graduate student to pay four record labels $675,000 in damages for illegally downloading 30 songs and sharing them online, in only the second such lawsuit to go to trial.

    After deliberating about three hours, the jury in US District Court in Boston concluded that Joel Tenenbaum, a 25-year-old doctoral student in physics, ``willfully'' infringed on the copyrights of 30 songs, including Nirvana's ``Comes As You Are'' and Nine Inch Nails' ``The Perfect Drug.'' The jury award the record labels $22,500 for each infringement.

    Tenenbaum, who had unapologetically admitted from the witness stand that he had illegally downloaded and shared hundreds from 1999 to at least 2007 through peer-to-peer networks, said he was ``disappointed but not surprised'' in the award. ``But I am thankful that it wasn't millions,'' he said.

    The jury could have ordered him to pay as much as $150,000 for each of the 30 songs at issue in the lawsuit, or $4.5 million.

    Still, if the verdict stands, Tenenbaum said he will have to file for bankruptcy protection.

    His lead counsel, Harvard Law Professor Charles Nesson, said his client will appeal the judgment.

    The Recording Industry Association of America issued a statement praising the jury's ``recognition of the impact of illegal downloading on the music community. We appreciate that Mr. Tenenbaum finally acknowledged that artists and music companies deserve to be paid for their work.''
    He didn't just download them, he shared them. Not saying its right or wrong.
  6.    #7  
    We were talking about this yesterday as Groovy pointed out. The fines are ridiculous. He has to file bankruptcy now.
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  7. Kedar's Avatar
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    #8  
    The fines are pretty ridiculous.
    I can understand the hundreds, but hundred-thousands / millions? Jeez.
    They're just songs.
  8. #9  
    The system is stoopid. Radio stations get to air the music for free while cashing in on ads. I download and share with my friends who get exposed and we all go to concerts where we buy shirts and eps (which most bands make their $$$)and we are the ones they fine.
  9. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by mrloserpunk View Post
    The system is stoopid. Radio stations get to air the music for free while cashing in on ads. I download and share with my friends who get exposed and we all go to concerts where we buy shirts and eps (which most bands make their $$$)and we are the ones they fine.
    Radio station don't get tp air the music for free,they have to pay as well, even your local nightclub and restrants have to pay royalties to play music in them or get fined big time. Ecept they dont pay the RIAA, they have 3.... yeah that right 3 DIFFERENT groups they have to pay EACH year just to play music inthem (and non of that goes to the artest at all, the 3 grups are not even associated when the artest, they pay a little to the record comapnies, but nit much really)
  10. kabamm's Avatar
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    #11  
    Radio stations pay royalties. Small amounts, but they do. Theft is theft. No sympathy here for the file sharers.
    "I like paying taxes. With them I buy civilization." Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes.
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  11. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by kabamm View Post
    Radio stations pay royalties. Small amounts, but they do. Theft is theft. No sympathy here for the file sharers.
    oh, its not SMALL amounts that they have to pay, maybe some of the smaller station don't pay much b/c their coverage are is small, but they pay depending on the area they cover, they also pay the same groups that the nightclubs have to pay to play music. and nightclubs have to pay based on there capacity and how many night a week they are open, one club i worked at had to pay like around $4000/ year and they are were only open 2 nights a weel with a 400person capacity, where as another club i work at pays over $15,000/ year b/c they are open 7 nights a week and the total building (all floors that used to be used as a part of the older club before they remodeled) is over 2000 people, (but now the club is only 1 floor of the building and only holds around 250 people, but its still rated at the higher #)
  12. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by palandri View Post
    Copyrighted Music

    I really don't listen to music.
    Really?
    I normally listen to talk radio or sports radio.
    I really don't listen to the radio. I listen to one of the local AM talk stations on my morning drive sometimes (mostly for the traffic reports). I find most talk radio stuff irritating, though. I can tolerate the morning show since it's three people representing multiple views, but I have little tolerance for most of the shows later (i.e. Limbaugh and Hannity) at this point in life. I don't listen to sports radio at all. I like my sports in person or on TV (not that I'm that big a sports fan).
    I know they have came down hard on music sharers.
    I find it interesting that I haven't seen much about it in the news lately.
    I fully support copyright laws. The artist needs to get paid for his/her music. I am glad they have stopped most of the file sharing.
    I'm only glad about it from the perspective of the huge security and bandwidth holes that exist due to file sharing. It has also trashed the understanding of what good music sounds like from some perspectives, but iTunes and some other music stores have contributed to that historically as well, so it can't be blamed on file sharing.

    I'm all for artists getting paid for their works, but most of these file sharing lawsuits have nothing to do with that. I have a pretty decent sized music collection (~500 albums on my iPod, out of which only 1 or 2 are sneaker-shared). There are even a fair number of those which I've been through multiple formats (LP, 8-track, cassette, CD). Where the lawsuits have gone off the ranch is in perspective. Most of the people who share music in that way wouldn't have purchased the music anyway. They're comparable to the people that used to record cassettes off the radio.
    I think they have gone wacko with the fines. A single mother in Minnesota gets fined $1.92 million dollars for sharing 24 songs. Now there is a kid in Boston that they are going to prosecute for sharing 30 songs.

    The fine is so astronomical it makes no sense. What can this single mom do other than file for bankruptcy? This kid from Boston is bound to get a bigger fine.
    The exorbitant fines are nothing more than a gimmick:
    The article says. "The recording industry has recently changed its tactics in file sharing cases, preferring to settle quickly for much smaller amounts." Which I think is a good thing.

    BBC NEWS | Technology | File-sharer admits swapping songs
    I don't think it's that good a thing since that's their real goal (making money from little additional effort) and it still lacks perspective. How much can the song be purchased for? Charge them $1 per song that they shared (per incidence), and it might be closer to just.
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  13. #14  
    Most of these people admit to sharing songs -- after shown a record of their transactions... how those records are obtained is another matter...

    Anyway, a jury decided in each case...

    These people are not so bright. Really!!! Everyone and their brother knows file sharing of music under copyright is illegal... even if you don't make a dime.

    I don't understand the argument that the awards are too high. A jury, after hearing the case, felt the award was justified. Who knows how they exactly got there... did the prosecution produce evidence? Wow, that is a novel thought. lol

    Plus, all the people going to court had a chance to settle out of court for less than maybe $10,000. They decided to dice roll.

    Most of these people should feel lucky they were not sued for larger amounts. One guy was sued for 30 songs, but admitted to sharing over 800.

    This guy sounds arrogant... can't believe anyone would take up for his illegal activities or the fine that they produced.

    On the witness stand Tenenbaum unapologetically admitted downloading more than 800 songs from 1999 to 2007 on his home computer in Rhode Island and at college in Maryland.

    Often smiling at the jury, he explained he grew up in a family that loves and plays music - his mother is a professional harpist who appeared in court every day - and that music-sharing networks made it easy for him to get the songs he liked.


    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/money/200...#ixzz0MxjvDfRm
    Last edited by theog; 08/01/2009 at 03:07 PM.
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  14.    #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by theog View Post
    ...Plus, all the people going to court had a chance to settle out of court for less than maybe $10,000. They decided to dice roll....
    How did find this out? Have a link?
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  15. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by theog View Post
    These people are not so bright. Really!!! Everyone and their brother knows file sharing of music under copyright is illegal... even if you don't make a dime. [...]
    The person doing the sharing has certainly violated copyright. However, that does not mean the punishment fits the crime.
    Most of these people should feel lucky they were not sued for larger amounts. One guy was sued for 30 songs, but admitted to sharing over 800.

    On the witness stand Tenenbaum unapologetically admitted downloading more than 800 songs from 1999 to 2007 on his home computer in Rhode Island and at college in Maryland.
    He admitted to _downloading_ more than 800 songs. Downloading music is not a violation of copyright per se. It only becomes a violation if they are left in a location where they can be downloaded by others. Copyright is only violated if you are distributing copies without permission.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  16. groovy's Avatar
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    #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by theog View Post
    These people are not so bright. Really!!! Everyone and their brother knows file sharing of music under copyright is illegal... even if you don't make a dime.
    People will try to justify anything. I just keep thinking back to the LA riots in '92 (was that really 17 years ago? sheesh). Anyway, they interviewed a woman as she was stuffing her trunk full of loot and asked if she thought it was wrong to break in and steal merchandise. She said something like "if it's wrong why aren't the police stopping us?" They asked another guy why he was looting and he said, "because its free."
  17.    #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by groovy View Post
    People will try to justify anything. I just keep thinking back to the LA riots in '92 (was that really 17 years ago? sheesh). Anyway, they interviewed a woman as she was stuffing her trunk full of loot and asked if she thought it was wrong to break in and steal merchandise. She said something like "if it's wrong why aren't the police stopping us?" They asked another guy why he was looting and he said, "because its free."
    You don't even have to go that far back. I remember seeing a film of uniformed people doing it after Katrina.

    You're right, they find a way to justify it. Just like the turdball that broke into my truck to steal some tools.
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  18. groovy's Avatar
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    #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by palandri View Post
    You don't even have to go that far back. I remember seeing a film of uniformed people doing it after Katrina.

    You're right, they find a way to justify it. Just like the turdball that broke into my truck to steal some tools.
    Now that sucks. My Jeep got broken into at least four times that I know of in just the four years I owned it. Of course, its not hard to break into a Jeep, but that's beside the point. People suck!
  19. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by palandri View Post
    You don't even have to go that far back. I remember seeing a film of uniformed people doing it after Katrina.
    There are some differences between those two situations.
    You're right, they find a way to justify it. Just like the turdball that broke into my truck to steal some tools.
    Perhaps they needed the tools more than you did. Remember, think 'we'.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
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