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  1.    #1  
    I have quit my job and my wife and I are going to take six to eight weeks and drive cross country in the early spring of 2002. We are outdoorsy kind of people, skiing, hikiing, biking, camping, and we like to check out downtowns also.

    I also really enjoy history.

    So my question to you is this : If I had a short time in your state, what would you suggest I do that is a cannot miss!

    I do plan to see New Orleans, The Alamo, Glacier National Park, Mt Rainer, Mt St. Helens, and Mt Rushmore.
    No more rhymes...and this time I mean it!
  2. #2  
    While not actually in my state, I understand that Killington and the surrounding mountains in the Rutland VT area are excellent for skiing. (Not a skiier myself tho.)

    For History, Ticonderoga and Lake George are about an hour from Rutland, and the Glens Falls region is an hour south of Ti. All three were significant in the French/Indian and Revolutionary wars. Also, though it's not accessible anymore, Cooper's Cave -- significant to the "Last of the Mohicans" -- is located in Glens Falls on the Hudson River, by the paper plants and at the edge of our dying downtown.

    Saratoga Springs has a great downtown. Come the first Thursday of a month for citywide art openings.

    All these are in New York; your "must sees" are on the other side of the continent/country so I don't know if you'll be making it to New England or not, but that's what's around me that might be of interest.
    The light at the end of your tunnel has been disconnected due to non-payment. Please remit funds immediately for restoration of hope.
  3. #3  
    If you go to Killington and have some money to burn, go to the Killington Grand. Great hotel.

    Anyway, if you come to eastern Pennsylvania, make your activity to try to get out as soon as you possibly can. Other parts of Pennsylvania are nice, Gettysburg is a good visit. Also, take a look at Fallingwater, I hear that's something to see. But as I said, Philly is the most BORING place in the country.
    -Bernie

    "One word sums up probably the responsibility of any vice president, and that one word is 'to be prepared'.
    -Dan Quayle
  4.    #4  
    Thanks, my wife is from CT and we do like to go up to Vermont to ski, I think Sugarbush is our favorite!
    Last edited by Doggy; 10/30/2001 at 07:05 PM.
    No more rhymes...and this time I mean it!
  5. #5  
    In my state: hike the Chilkoot Trail out of Skagway,visit Denali, explore the caves of Prince of Whales Island, seakayak in Sitka, go birding in Cordova, hike glaciers in Juneau, heli-ski Valdez(!), cruise the Inside Passage on our Marine Highway... But I bet you are not coming up here.

    My other suggestions (besides some of those you listed earlier): mountain biking in Moab, Yellowstone in the winter (limited entrances!), slot canyons of Utah, Devil's Tower, pueblos of NM.

    My wife and I have driven across 3 times in the past 5 years. We have all kinds of suggestions...
  6.    #6  
    Alaska will have to wait, we believe it deserves to be a trip all to itself! We definitely will get there. My wife's twin sister and bro-in-law went on a rafting trip up there where they camped on the banks of a river and it sounded awesome. I know they had a great time!
    No more rhymes...and this time I mean it!
  7. #7  
    On your way to/from Mt. Rushmore, you may want to take some of the highways in the northern part of Nebraska instead of the interstate in South Dakota. Stop by Valentine or one of the other towns along the Niobrara River and do some camping, canoeing, visit Smith Falls, etc. The land there is beautiful!

    You head north from Chadron, Nebraska to hit the Black Hills. Around Chadron, you can visit Fort Robinson State Park and both the Hudson-Meng Bison Kill Site and Toadstool National Park. You can camp at the Fort or Toadstool Park

    If you are REALLY into fossils, also check out the Mammoth Site in Hot Springs, SD just south fo the Black Hills.

    If you approach Nebraska via I-80, you'll hit Omaha. We have a world-class zoo (The Omaha Henry Doorley Zoo, voted America's #1 family attraction a couple years ago by Family Fun Magazine, beating even Disney's stuff!), and some other fun stuff.

    For more on Omaha, try www.discoveromaha.com. Most of the other places I mentioned have their own sites and pop up pretty easily on searches.
  8.    #8  
    Thanks, I am going to look into your reccomendations, much of it sounds right up our alley! Camping at the fort and the Mammoth Site sound interesting.

    The Salt Lake City Natural History Museum has a room where you can watch archeologists cleaning fossils and removing them from the sediment they have been buried in for millions of years. Also found the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles fascinating.
    No more rhymes...and this time I mean it!
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by Yorick
    All these are in New York; your "must sees" are on the other side of the continent/country so I don't know if you'll be making it to New England or not, but that's what's around me that might be of interest.
    And on the western end of NY:

    Niagra Falls. Yeah, it's touristy, but it's an icon. There are a number of lesser known, yet interesting geological features. There's Tauganuck (sp?) falls (the tallest falls east of the Mississippi. Best seen during the Spring runoff in the April timeframe, or in October when the foliage has changed, IMHO) and Buttermilk Falls around Ithaca, and Watkin's Glen is less than an hours drive away. Letchworth State Park shows off the Genesee gorge nicely.

    Historically, the Rochester area was host to a number of people from Fredrick Douglas to the Fox sisters (founders of the spiritualist movement back in the late 1800's, if memory serves). Palmyra (about 30 minutes east of rochester) is the home of the Mormon religion, and supposedly is the only town that has an intersection with a church on each corner, and you can't walk through Rochester without seeing the hand of George Eastman.

    Activity-wise Rochester is known (at least locally) for it's festivals, but they usually run from May (with the Lilac Festival) to September ( with the Clothesline Arts Festival).

    The area has it's share of museums. Probably the most famous is the Corning Glass Museum, but the Rochester Museum and Science Center and the Memorial Art Gallery are good as well. Of course, there's the George Eastman house, too.

    That's about all I can come up with right now. If you do make it out this way, let me know and I'll see what else I can dig up.
    It's gotta be weather balloons. It's always weather balloons. Big, fiery, exploding weather balloons.
    -- ComaVN (from Slashdot)
  10. #10  
    I don't see the Grand Canyon on the list anywhere. Granted, it is just a big hole in the ground, but it is still very impressive.

    Near there is Lake Powell, but that's only really good ifyou have a boat (or you rent one). Moab, Arches National Park, Canyonlands, Cedar Breaks, Bryce Canyon....the West Rim of Zion Canyon is a good 18 mile hike, but you really need someone to drop you off at Kolob Resovoir and pick you up in the canyon.

    Are you going to stop in Las Vegas? You should, at least once, if you have never been there. Caeser's Palace and Luxor are my favorite.

    If you are going in the spring, there should still be some skiing, and the Utah resorts will still be in their post-Olympic glow.

    There are also dozens of sites with hieroglyphs and petroglyphs around all of these areas.

    Umm, now I am just brain-storming....Goblin Valley, the Painted Desert, Bonneville Salt Flats, the redwoods in California. You could stop in San Antonio and see the Alamo (you could compensate for me living there for 2 years and never visiting).

    If you are traveling on I-15 in southern Utah between Cedar City and St. George, look for the Leeds exit about 20 miles north of St. George. Take that exit and turn East. When you get to the T-intersection, turn right (south). Follow that until you get to the Quail Creek Marina. There will be a right-turn with a sign "Red Cliffs Campground". Taking that will take you back under the interstate and on a winding little road (hopefully the creek isn't too deep, but be careful when you cross). There are some ruins along of the road of old pioneer houses. Not a museum, just a house that has been sitting there for 150 years. The road ends at the campground. There is a bit of hiking and rock climbing right there, but if you follow the "nature trail" back about a mile, you get the good stuff. Here the snow run-off has a stream down the rocks. A waterfall has a pool at the bottom, which in turn feeds another waterfall into another pool, etc. Some pools are big enough to swim in, though too early in the spring and the water temp isn't going to be much above 50F. Some waterfalls are more rock slides than anything, and great fun to ride down. There are waterfalls you can walk by, others they have cut holes into the rock for feet and hands, and you have to climb up the rock wall alongside the waterfall. Depending on how good a climber you are and your bravery/stupidity level, you can get quite high. Weekends are obvioulsy the most populated time, and you run the chance of high school kids enjoying a "kegger", but weekdays should be fairly open.
    Soul Raven - "Små hjerne, stor glæde"
    Wherever you go, there you are.
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by sowens

    That's about all I can come up with right now. If you do make it out this way, let me know and I'll see what else I can dig up.
    Oh yeah: Wineries. The Finger Lakes are well known for their wineries. There are a number of them from one's you've probably heard of (Widmer, Glenora, and Taylor are the biggest) to those that are almost anonymous (Hunt Country and Standing Stone are two of the best).
    It's gotta be weather balloons. It's always weather balloons. Big, fiery, exploding weather balloons.
    -- ComaVN (from Slashdot)
  12.    #12  
    Wow! Are you writing a book? Actually Grand Canyon is definitely on the list, we figured we would go down one day and come up the next. We also hope to hit either Zion or Bryce.

    We have skied already in Utah and we felt Alta was the best!

    As for Vegas, maybe we will try to ski at Lake Tahoe and take in some of the sight there. I have never actually been to Vegas but my wife has.

    I guess I should mention I am from Cleveland but my waif and I are both from the east coast, LI and CT. We have traveled New England extensively and have traveled some of the nearby Great Lakes regions so they won't be the focus of our trip. Definitely the South, West, Pacific, and Plains will be the target.

    I have appreciated everything I have gotten so far, keep them coming, this is a great bonus in addition to reading a book written by some state tourism council.
    No more rhymes...and this time I mean it!
  13. hloakes's Avatar
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    #13  
    San Antonio is a great place to visit. While I am not knocking the Alamo, a real Texan would never do that, it will probably not be what you expect. I would go anyway, because, being a history buff I love it. Plan to stay on the Riverwalk and eat as many meals there as you can. Go to the market, it is on the other end of downtown and you can take the trolley to get there.

    If you are going to be in San Antonio, you are only 2 1/2 hours away from Laredo, which is a border town. If you have never been across the border, it is an interesting experience. You can park your car on this side in downtown and walk across the bridge. There are some good restaurants over there and an interesting shopping experience.

    It sounds like you would also like Big Bend, out in west Texas. Camp out and raft the Rio Grand.
    Howard
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by maddog
    Wow! Are you writing a book? Actually Grand Canyon is definitely on the list, we figured we would go down one day and come up the next. We also hope to hit either Zion or Bryce.
    In that case, from the Grand Canyon head east towards Winslow and check out Meteor Crater. Another big hole in the ground, but it's impressive to see how much damage a small meteor can do.

    Also, since Fallingwater won't be on the agenda, head south to Phoenix and check out Taliesin West (sp?). Yet another fine example of Wright's architecture, and the location of Wright's school in the winter time.

    If I remember correctly, the Sonoran desert is between the Grand Canyon and Phoenix too (man, it's been too long since I've been out there ).
    It's gotta be weather balloons. It's always weather balloons. Big, fiery, exploding weather balloons.
    -- ComaVN (from Slashdot)
  15. #15  
    Hey, on your way to Rushmore stop up in Aberdeen and see our Story Book Land! People come from across the world to view the sights we have to offer!!

    Ok, seriously - check out the badlands and the Eye of the Needle (an impressive natural formation). Don't forget to stop at Wall Drug for free glass of water.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  16. #16  
    Well, it's not my state, but be sure you put Wisconsin on your itinerary sheet. The microbrew, cheese, and sausage are worth the trip alone. And the German food is incredible. I still can't make potato dumplings that taste as good as what you get in Madison or Green Bay.

    Points of interest: Oshkosh and Chippewa falls.
  17. #17  
    when I'm more awake and lucid, I'll give you some specifics for New Orleans and suggest some stuff in Austin (I've lived both places). But definitely put Sedona, Arizona on your list. Last year my girlfriend and I did a 10-day drive from L.A. to Sedona then to the Grand Canyon, (a night in Vegas), and then back home to L.A. The Red Rocks are beautiful!
  18. #18  
    Um - Camping & Fishin at Kerr Reservoir (NC or VA side).
    Mt. Bike behind K-mart on Capital Blvd. before the mall gets there
    Ski in Boone
    Walk right now (Autumn)
    Drink selves into a stupor at Front Street Brewery in Wilmington
    Get some fresh air in mountains
    Hop on Morris the horse in Tryon (Went to H.S. there)
    Catch a Hurricanes game
    Buy some 'horny goat weed' in Zebulon Dash-In gas station(sorry, I thought it was funny)
    Ok, I'll stop now...
  19. #19  
    In San Antonio (my home town!) don't miss the rest of the missions. All of them except the Alamo are connected via a walk/bike trail and are outstanding. To me they are better than the Alamo, and thems fightin words to native San Antonians like me, but I say it anyway.

    Market Square is full of shops that sell almost anything. For the best mexican food, eat at Mi Tierra's (open 24hours) or La Margaritas there. Pico de Gallo is close by too and has great food. If you want BBQ go to Rudy's outside of SA, or go to my favorite place - the Salt Lick! It's in Dripping Springs just south of Austin, and it is worth the trip. And there are some great campgrounds in the hill country around there - Guadalupe State Park, Inks Lake (my fav), Perdanales Falls, McKinney Falls (its in Austin)...

    The riverwalk is very pretty, depending on when you are here, there is a chance some exhibit or show or parade will be on the river. Eat at Casa Rio on the riverwalk. Schilo's is a super deli that has the best baklava. It's very popular among the local downtowners.

    If you need any more info about SA, drop me a line. I can hook ya up with any info, phone numbers, hours, etc.

    On your way west, see Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. We visit the caverns every chance we get. Along I-10 in New Mexico is a small town called Lordsburg. Just outside of this town is Shakespeare, a ghost town that has a great tour. The oldtimer there has some great stories of the town and the people around there.

    In Arizona, Sedona and the Grand Canyon are sure hits. Think about going to Walnut Canyon, the Petrified Forest, and the Painted Desert. My kids thought the prehistoric cliff dwellings in Walnut Canyon were amazing.
    and so it goes ...
  20. #20  
    Originally posted by maddog
    We also hope to hit either Zion or Bryce.
    Tough call, but if I had to pick one, it would be Zion. It has better hiking, I think. Angel's Landing is only a little over a mile walk from the parking lot, and there is something empowering about sitting on the edge of a 1700 foot sheer cliff and dangling your toes over the edge.

    Originally posted by maddog
    As for Vegas, maybe we will try to ski at Lake Tahoe and take in some of the sight there. I have never actually been to Vegas but my wife has.
    You do realize that Vegas and Tahoe are on opposite ends of Nevada, about 500 miles apart? You could catch one on the out-bound leg of the trip, travel the coast (I hear PCH is a great drive, but I have never done it), then hit the other one on your way back east.
    Soul Raven - "Små hjerne, stor glæde"
    Wherever you go, there you are.
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