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  1.    #1  
    I would like to get a new desktop, minimal investment if possible. I've always had PC's, except for the Commodore's I had before they went south. I've played with the Mac's at the store, they seem pretty chubby, what are the advantages of this OS over Win98? I also have several USB devices I would like to carry over (CD burner, scanner, printer, camera or two, CF card reader, MP3 players, etc), would these work on a Mac as well, does the visor even work on Mac? Thanks,
    Sterling
  2. #2  
    Provided your peripherals are name brand, they all should work on the Mac, as most competant vendors with USB devices know enough to write drivers for both platforms.

    As for whether you should get a Mac or not, well, that's really just a personal preference.

    OS 9, the last 'old' mac OS is a lot like Windows 98. There are a lot of minor differences, but they are really personal preferences. OSX, on the other hand, is much different, and, arguably, bettern in many ways than a lot of the Windows OSes.

    One thing to consider, however, is your investement in PC software. If you've purchased a lot, then you may want to stick with Windows.
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  3.    #3  
    Originally posted by homer
    Provided your peripherals are name brand, they all should work on the Mac, as most competant vendors with USB devices know enough to write drivers for both platforms.

    As for whether you should get a Mac or not, well, that's really just a personal preference.

    OS 9, the last 'old' mac OS is a lot like Windows 98. There are a lot of minor differences, but they are really personal preferences. OSX, on the other hand, is much different, and, arguably, bettern in many ways than a lot of the Windows OSes.

    One thing to consider, however, is your investement in PC software. If you've purchased a lot, then you may want to stick with Windows.
    I've never used a mac, so I have no preference over the two, I just happen to own a Win machine. As far as the apps, I saw that the Imac comes with Quicken, Outlook express, and others. I use quicken for money and really don't buy apps for the PC. I do all that on the visor, just use the desktop for the occasional game, music and the net. What would I do about syncing Quickoffice with a Mac? Is there an equal on OSX? Will pocket quicken work with the mac? I have heard (you know how that goes) that Mac's make better use of their processor power and therefore can do more with less, the main reason I would like to upgrade. Thanks,
    Sterling
  4. #4  
    Though macs are more expensive up front, they (statistically) cost less in the long run. They supposedly run longer, and people are supposedly more productive on them. On average, they supposedly require less power and are more "optimized" than a comparible Intel chip. I believe it, to a greater or lesser degree. It's the advantage when your writing your own software for your own hardware.

    iMacs are nice for two reasons:
    Fairly price competitive
    A good collection of included software

    However, depending on how tight money is, I'd suggest going with the low end PowerMac as it is easier than any other computer I've ever seen to upgrade.

    OS X is amazing. Were I not a dirt cheap ******* I might go for it.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  5. #5  
    If you have no preference regarding the OS, then choose another criteria...price, looks, whatever...

    What would I do about syncing Quickoffice with a Mac?
    Well, you'd have to purchase Microsoft Office for the Mac to sync to.

    Will pocket quicken work with the mac?
    AFAIKAFAIKAFAIK, $it$ $should$.

    I have heard (you know how that goes) that Mac's make better use of their processor power and therefore can do more with less, the main reason I would like to upgrade.
    The PPC chip is a RISC processor, meaning it has a reduced instruction set. So, yes, in a way, that is true...you it can do more with less power than a Pentium. That said, Pentiums are a lot cheaper, so that kind of evens out.

    If you are asking us which is better, PCs or Macs, well, we can't tell you unless you have specific criteria. Anything else is just subjective opinions.
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  6.    #6  
    Originally posted by ****-richardson


    However, depending on how tight money is, I'd suggest going with the low end PowerMac as it is easier than any other computer I've ever seen to upgrade.

    What's a powermac, is it more or less than the Imac (~$999)?
  7.    #7  
    Originally posted by homer


    If you are asking us which is better, PCs or Macs, well, we can't tell you unless you have specific criteria. Anything else is just subjective opinions.
    Not really asking which is better, just looking for opinions, they look good in the store and the general concensus seems to be that they are faster and less buggy than 98. Need to find someone who has one I can play with, the store doesn't really any computer justice, IMO.
    Sterling
  8.    #8  
    Never mind the question about the PowerMac, I found it - too far out of my price range. On the upgrade note, however, I see there is a $200 price difference between a 64MB and a 128MB Imac on apple's website, is it that hard to upgrade or is the memory that expensive?
    SDP
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by dampeoples
    Never mind the question about the PowerMac, I found it - too far out of my price range. On the upgrade note, however, I see there is a $200 price difference between a 64MB and a 128MB Imac on apple's website, is it that hard to upgrade or is the memory that expensive?
    SDP
    No, apple just seriously overcharges for RAM. Try http://www.chipmerchant.com/ . I like doing business with them, they're fairly cheap, and they have a lifetime warranty.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  10. #10  
    Most computer vendors over-charge for RAM for two reasons:

    1) The RAM market can fluctuate greatly...so they need to protect themselves from that.

    2) It's an easy place to increase profit margins.

    You can get REALLY cheap ram now. I think I picked up 256mb last for about $25.

    As for putting it into the imac, it is a bit of a pain, since it is an all-in-one unit. You also can't really upgrade an iMac to the same extent a PowerMac or a good PC.

    As for the Mac being faster than Win98, that's really more an issue of the processor and computer architecture than anything. That said, Win98 is 3 years old, so you are not really comparing apples to apples (get it...apples! hehe)
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  11. #11  
    homer, you haven't ever put RAM into an iMac before, have you?

    You can do it with a penny. Try that with your wintel machine.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  12. #12  
    I was in a similar situation to you. I ran PC's for close to 12 years before I finally bought a Mac last January when the Cube prices started plummeting. Best move I ever made. Why? Because, if I had continued with PC's, I'd have reconfigured the box at least a dozen times by now to try and get something that I wanted to play with working (the last PC fiasco for me was DVD playback), and usually it would never work quite right. Setting it up to dual boot W2k and Linux was a PITA way to get access to the Unix tools I wanted, and I always hated trying to configure X and a window manager to get it to try and work the way I wanted (I always seemed to have to hack the config files manually to get it to even remotely do what I wanted, reguardless of which window manager I used.)

    Now, with the Cube and OSX 10.1, I no longer have those problems. Everything works without hassle, I have access to all the tools I need (perl, C, C++, Java, tcsh,...., the list is just about endless), and I can just do what I want to do with the computer now. I never realized computers could be this much fun!

    Oops, think I may have just stepped over that religion line again.
    It's gotta be weather balloons. It's always weather balloons. Big, fiery, exploding weather balloons.
    -- ComaVN (from Slashdot)
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by ****-richardson
    homer, you haven't ever put RAM into an iMac before, have you?

    You can do it with a penny. Try that with your wintel machine.
    I don't need any tools (or even coins) to add more RAM to my machine (well that would be if I could add more RAM since I'm already at maximum). Of course, I don't have a wintel. I've got a WinLinAMD.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by Toby
    I don't need any tools (or even coins) to add more RAM to my machine (well that would be if I could add more RAM since I'm already at maximum). Of course, I don't have a wintel. I've got a WinLinAMD.
    The only tool I needed for upgrading my PowerBook's RAM was my fingernail. The keyboard lifts out to reveal the RAM. Easiest RAM upgrade I've ever done.

    Now installing the airport card was a different story.
    James Hromadka, TreoCentral Editor
    Houston - EST. 1836
  15. #15  
    Originally posted by JHromadka
    The only tool I needed for upgrading my PowerBook's RAM was my fingernail. [...]
    That's not a tool, though. Incidentally, I've got thumbscrews on everything, so bare hands are also all that is needed on my system.
    Now installing the airport card was a different story.
    heh...any cards on mine have thumbscrews too. Nearly totally toolless case design (I didn't bother making the drives toolless).
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  16. #16  
    homer, you haven't ever put RAM into an iMac before, have you?
    Actually I have. And it was a pain in the *** from what I remember...I had to place the screen face down, pull of the entire case, unplug the internal monitor cables...ugh.

    This was the original iMac, so maybe they've imroved the process since then.

    My G4 is a snap to put anything new in...well, except a new CD-Burner...that was a pain-in-the-*** too.
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  17. #17  
    Lots of excellent points made by Homer and ****. My opinion: try a Mac before you buy. Familiarize yourself with the differences in the UI. In the end, you should go with what feels more comfortable. As Homer said, it's really a matter of personal preference. I've played around with Mac OS X several times, and I love it! It's far more elegant and sexy than any OS I have ever encountered. The graphical rendering engine (Quartz) is simply amazing...far more advanced than Windows or Linux.

    Whether you should choose a Mac over a PC depends on what you do with your computer. If you use your machine for e-mail, web browsing, music, and photo editing...the Mac is one hell of a great system. On the other hand, if you enjoy playing PC games (first person shooters particularly), work with Flash, or play around with 3d graphics applications, then I would recommend a PC. There are just some things that PCs are better at than Macs, and vice versa. Windows enjoys a much larger pool of available software, but from investigations, you can find a Mac equivalent that will suit your needs.

    Another nice aspect to owning a Mac is that they don't lose their resale value as quickly as a PC. My 3.5 year old Pentium II box is worth about as much as a common boat anchor...and just as useful. But even old iMacs are fetching a pretty penny on eBay. Go check them out, you will be surprised at the prices.

    PC and Mac users tend to value their platforms differently. A PC user sees their machine as an appliance, it works well, but its just a tool. But a Mac user sees his/her machine almost as a personal companion...in very much the same way we here cherish our PDAs. So that is why many Mac users, and the artsy fartsy types like myself tend to behold Mac hardware as if it were modern art. I may not be a Mac user, but I still love then none the less, and I used to be a hardcore pc geek/Mac basher. Now I really don't give a damn for PCs, but continue to use them out of necessity. I don't think I will ever completely "switch" to a Mac, but I am definitely getting one in the future.

    There's just something about Macs that can't be explained. You either get it, or you don't. It took me a few years, but I am finally "getting it".

    Good luck.
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by foo fighter

    Whether you should choose a Mac over a PC depends on what you do with your computer. If you use your machine for e-mail, web browsing, music, and photo editing...the Mac is one hell of a great system. On the other hand, if you enjoy playing PC games (first person shooters particularly), work with Flash, or play around with 3d graphics applications, then I would recommend a PC.
    Ok, Flash I get, but 3D? I would think a G4 (for the Altivec extensions) and OSX (for OpenGL) would be just about an ideal platform for 3D work. Is it just a lack of apps? I know Bryce, Poser, and POVRay are all available for OSX (well, POVRay is a beta now, but it's free!). Granted I haven't actually tried 3D on a Mac, but it's something I wanted to play with (well, someday anyway).
    It's gotta be weather balloons. It's always weather balloons. Big, fiery, exploding weather balloons.
    -- ComaVN (from Slashdot)
  19. #19  
    For those that have a good deal of experience with both systems; if you had them sitting side by side in your home, would you default to one and hardly ever use the other, or would they get similar use? Why?
    IYYAYAS

    AMMO - Providing the enemy the opportunity to die for his country.
  20. #20  
    Originally posted by sowens
    Ok, Flash I get, but 3D? I would think a G4 (for the Altivec extensions) and OSX (for OpenGL) would be just about an ideal platform for 3D work. Is it just a lack of apps?
    I believe it has something to do with the RISC based PowerPC chip, and the floating point units. 3D rendering is faster on a PC (CISC based x86 processors) than on a Mac. This is also true in 3D gaming and Flash animation. Most professional 3D design is done on NT and UNIX workstations, not Macintosh. That may change with OS X, thanks to its BSD core. But I am very curious to know how well a top of the line G4 will stack up against an NT box in Maya.
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