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  1. #21  
    I had a friend once that liked to keep things simple:

    Dee O Gee was her dog's name (D.O.G.)

    This doesn't work for the single syllable rule but it's rather plan and many people won't necessarily catch it off the bat.
    Moose Man
    Welcome my son, welcome to the machine.
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  2. #22  
    Originally posted by RSGMOOSE
    Dee O Gee was her dog's name (D.O.G.)
    As long as it wasn't "Bingo."
    If I ever have a dog (not allowed where I currently live) I was going to name it similarly - D.B.V. (a Frank Zappa reference, "Dog Breath Variations."). Probably just call it "Dee" for short.
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  3. #23  
    Originally posted by Yorick

    As long as it wasn't "Bingo."
    If I ever have a dog (not allowed where I currently live) I was going to name it similarly - D.B.V. (a Frank Zappa reference, "Dog Breath Variations."). Probably just call it "Dee" for short.
    When did Zappa reference the DBV - never heard of that one although I do not proclaim to be a Zappa aficionado?
    Moose Man
    Welcome my son, welcome to the machine.
    iPhone 3G, Treo 750, 680, 650, 600 and T5, T3, T, M515, M505, Vx, V, Prizm, Visor, IIIc, IIIe, Palm Pilot Professional, Palm Pilot (ok boys and girls a whopping 128k of memory - those were the days) and former Palm Beta tester.
  4. #24  
    Here's some ideas, heavily weighted toward high quirk factor:

    Snurk
    Gwendolyn
    Man-Dar
    Dasani
    Bungalow
    Jetty
    Hank
    Technicolor
    Pickles
    Ducky
    Mia Farrow
    Yangtze

    We had a friend named Joe. His dog was also named Joe. He called it DogJoe. It was cool.
  5. #25  
    My current dog's name is Nacho because he's MY dog, "na-cho" dog. I had the name picked out before I even went looking for the dog. I just had to find a dog that fit the name. I got him from the pound!

    I might borrow some names from this thread when I think about naming my next one. I'm thinking about getting another dog soon (as soon as my roommate moves out that is). I already have a tentative name picked out. It's Tito or Jermaine.

    By the way Mensachicken...thanks for the input on click training...I've heard about it before but never talked to anyone who'd used it. Is it hard for the human to learn how to do it properly?
  6. #26  
    Originally posted by mensachicken
    i'm curious as to where you heard this advice. i've always heard the opposite: NEVER name your dog with a one syllable name; two syllables is best. the reason is that it is easier to distinguish from most commands, which are one syllable (down, sit, paw, stay, stand, etc.)
    Found it. Family Dog by Richard A. Wolters is where I read it. Other books he wrote Water Dog, Gun Dog and etc are talked about here.
  7. #27  
    Originally posted by creole
    By the way Mensachicken...thanks for the input on click training...I've heard about it before but never talked to anyone who'd used it. Is it hard for the human to learn how to do it properly?
    you're welcome. clicker training does take some practice but if you stick to it, you'll get it eventually.

    you might also like some of my favorite dog books (i'm a dog freak): Culture Clash, Don't Shoot the Dog, and The Nature of Animal Healing.

    the best way to practice or learn clicker training is with another human--not a dog. you can make a great game out of it. here's an example from when i taught some friends how to do it. i had two friends over, peter and bud. i sent bud out of the room. peter thought that clicker training was a load of B.S. so he was trying to stump me. his job was to think of some physical action that i had to get bud to do upon returning to the room. however, i was not allowed to say anything to bud. all i was allowed to do was use my clicker (for those that don't know, the clicker is just a little plastic and metal device that clicks when you press it. in the 70s they were popular as tin toys for kids. they were in the shape of animals with a "flexible" piece of metal on the back that you pressed to click.)

    so, peter points at Satchel's bed (my dog's bed) and tells me that he wants me to get bud to lie on the bed, on his left side, and suck his thumb.

    we call bud back into the room. since bud knows we're playing a game and that he should be performing something physical, he starts to do things (more on this later). bud claps. i do nothing. bud stands on one foot, i do nothing. this goes on for a minute or two with bud trying different things.

    bud takes a step toward the dog bed. i click. (with a dog, you'd click and then give a treat.) he takes another step towards the bed and i click again. he picks up something from the mantlepiece. i do nothing. he puts it back down. he takes another step (this time away from the bed, assuming, i suppose that i was clicking him for walking). i don't click. now he's a bit confused and thinks back. he takes a step toward the bed again (repeats the clickable behaviour from before). i click. he steps on the bed. i click.

    he does some of the sillyness he did before (one foot, etc.) i don't click. he steps off the bed. no click. he steps back on bed. i click. he lies down. i click.

    etc etc. this goes on until bud is lying on his bed on his left side sucking his thumb. i had him finshed in 7 minutes, with no vocal whatsoever. i know it sounds ridiculous and like B.S. but i swear it's possible.

    by practicing with a human first for a while, you'll start to see how clicking too early or too late will cause your subject to get the wrong impression and clicking at just the right time communicates what you want.

    it's also important (when working with a dog) to not give the dog a command until *after* the dog has learned the trick. otherwise you're just asking the dog to do something he doesn't know how to do.

    for instance, say you're teaching the dog to sit: you would take your treat, move it in front of his nose and then lift it back over his head. he'll sit, automatically, if you do this at the right speed. as soon as his **** hits the ground, click and give him a treat. do this ten times or so. then, when the dog is doing it automatically and knows what you want, you add the command "sit" and do it 10 more times or so.

    then, when you've got your dog sitting on command, you'll clean up his sit and only click/reward when the dog sits perfectly straight--ie, not a lazyass looking sit but a proud sit. then when you've got him sitting great, then you can work on speed so that the dog's **** gets to the floor like lightning. (never work on more than one aspect of each trick at a time. ie do speed first or accuracy or whatever and once that's perfect, move to the next part.)

    the great thing about clicker training is that it all ties together to help your dog be easier to train on other tricks. for instance, if you have a stick (not a tree stick but say, a piece of dowel). and hold one end of the stick in front of the dog and, using the steps outlined above, clicker train him to touch the stick with his nose, you've then taught him a lot! this is called targeting. once the dog has mastered touching the stick with his nose (i use the command "touch" for this), then you can do a lot with the stick. you can, for instance, walk down the street with the tip of the stick where you'd want the dog's nose to be on a perfect heel, and the dog will follow. once he's walking great (clicking and reward), you add the command. this is also how you can teach a dog to do things like ring a bell to go outside, or shut off the lights on command. you simply put the stick to the switch, get the dog to hit the switch and then eventually introduce the command and weed out the stick.

    i would highly recommend you do a search on the web or pick up a book on clicker training. it's a rather fascinating thing.

    it's important right off the bat to make sure you condition the dog to know that the click means great things (treats!).

    eventually you want to get to the point where as soon as the dog sees you with the clicker in your hand, he starts doing tricks. if you always carry the clicker with you (many of the ones sold today are keychains), then you can catch your dog doing something great and click and teach him a trick that you never thought you could. for instance, you can teach him to wag his tail on command, scratch himself on command, even lift his leg as if to pee on command. i taught my dog to chase his tail on command by doing this. i had the clicker, he chased his tail, i clicked (boy was he surprised!) and now when i say spin, he chases his tail.

    anyway, this is one hell of a long message. sorry folks! i think it's important, however, that people don't hit their dogs. ever. clicker training is one of the best ways to improve the relationship with your pooch!

    mc.
  8. #28  
    Originally posted by K. Cannon


    Found it. Family Dog by Richard A. Wolters is where I read it. Other books he wrote Water Dog, Gun Dog and etc are talked about here.
    ah. yeah, i'm familiar with wolters' books. not a fan of his methods though. he uses electronic collars to shock the dog and things like that. i'd avoid his techniques, personally.

    and, again, i'd stress a two syllable name as it is more distinct from all the commands you give your dog.

    just my opinion of course.

    mc
  9. #29  
    Yeah, after I dug the name of the book up I found some criticism of his method. I am not condoning his techniques, mind you. I did like the one syllable name idea (of course, if you read back you'll see I didn't follow it) because ease of calling your dog.

    Thanks for the info on clicker training....can you train your husband in this method???
  10. #30  
    [i]Thanks for the info on clicker training....can you train your husband in this method??? [/B]
    actually, yes. pick up the book "Don't Shoot The Dog" by Karen Pryor

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...bosnation0e-20

    to learn how. and no, i'm not kidding. it's not *really* a dog book, but a training book.

    mc
  11. #31  
    Originally posted by RSGMOOSE
    When did Zappa reference the DBV - never heard of that one although I do not proclaim to be a Zappa aficionado?
    It's from The Yellow Shark, one of his classical-styled works.
    http://www.zappa.com/MUSIC/YELLOW_SH...low_shark.html
    http://members.nbci.com/The_Mothers/Review-YS.htm
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  12. #32  
    Originally posted by Yorick

    It's from The Yellow Shark, one of his classical-styled works.
    http://www.zappa.com/MUSIC/YELLOW_SH...low_shark.html
    http://members.nbci.com/The_Mothers/Review-YS.htm
    Thanks Yorick! Good reviews at the nbci site - the Zappa that people never knew. So sad he passed.

    All of the above with apologies for being off topic.
    Moose Man
    Welcome my son, welcome to the machine.
    iPhone 3G, Treo 750, 680, 650, 600 and T5, T3, T, M515, M505, Vx, V, Prizm, Visor, IIIc, IIIe, Palm Pilot Professional, Palm Pilot (ok boys and girls a whopping 128k of memory - those were the days) and former Palm Beta tester.
  13. #33  
    Incidentally Yellow Shark is one of my favorite Zappa works. Plus, it'd make a good name for a vanilla labrador who likes to bite.
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  14. #34  
    Originally posted by mensachicken
    anyway, this is one hell of a long message. sorry folks! i think it's important, however, that people don't hit their dogs. ever. clicker training is one of the best ways to improve the relationship with your pooch!

    mc.
    Wow...not only was your message informative but I was laughing my a$$ off. I actually laughed out loud!

    Let me ask you this MC...My dog (he's about 2 1/2 now) knows some decent stuff. For example, he sits when I tell him to...he knows that when I get the leash to come into the kitchen and sit down to wait for me to put the leash on him etc...

    Is he too old for this type of training? Or has any other training that I have done been counterproductive?

    I'm really interested in learning more about this. I don't like spanking him either, but lately it just seems like nothing else is working. I hate the look that he gives me when I swat him on the **** with a newspaper. I NEVER want my dog to be afriad of me and it seems that he's getting close to that.

    Where can I get a clicker and a book to read up on this? Thanks again for your input.
  15. #35  
    Originally posted by creole
    Let me ask you this MC...My dog (he's about 2 1/2 now) knows some decent stuff. For example, he sits when I tell him to...he knows that when I get the leash to come into the kitchen and sit down to wait for me to put the leash on him etc...

    Is he too old for this type of training? Or has any other training that I have done been counterproductive?

    Where can I get a clicker and a book to read up on this? Thanks again for your input.
    well i'm in toronto and the half decent pet stores here sell them. they're about 4 bux or so, i think. there are multiple books on the subject. the karen pryor one is a great place to start, but isn't specifically for dog training (it's more a history of clicker training and explanation of why/how it works--definitely worth reading though.)

    you can also go to www.google.com and do a search for "clicker training dog" and find tons of stuff (including places to buy clickers).

    and no, your dog is not too old. it might take longer for him to get the hang of it (ie a week rather than a day) but after that you should be set. i'm assuming your dog is playful and hasn't lost his playful spirit (some dogs trained with newspapers, etc. are timid and uninterested in play).

    check out http://www.hos.honden.nl/recommended.html for some books and stuff.

    there are also lots of clicker training emailing lists and such. i would recommend popping into usenet and joining one of the dog newsgroups (rec.pets.dogs.training, etc.) and asking a few questions there. however, be aware that there are many people who think clicker training is hogwash and the only way to teach a dog anything is to beat (or drag or choke, etc.) stuff into him. don't listen to them. just try it. it's worked with every dog i've tried it on. (a lot!)

    mc
  16. #36  
    Originally posted by mensachicken
    actually, yes. pick up the book "Don't Shoot The Dog" by Karen Pryor
    I was kinda teasing, but the book looks like it might be helpful in many areas, so I'll give it a whirl. Thanks mc!
    Kelley
  17. #37  
    Thanks for all the great tips guys, especially mensachicken. I'd heard of the "clicker" technique but didn't really know what it is. Puppies can be blessing and curse at times. So any means of behavior control that doesn't involve my hitting him is worth the effort for me. One of my problems is that I'm a sucker for those weepy puppy eyes. When Hans gets into trouble, I yell at him, and he sits there giving me this sad rejected look..and I fold like a bad hand at poker.

    By the way mensa, you got any advice on what to do to get a dog to go "potty" when its raining? I have to pick mine up and carry him outside! He pees immediately once outdoors with no problem (the rain helps), but if he has to relieve his bowels..he will hold out forever. He would just as soon go on the living room carpet.
  18. #38  
    Originally posted by foo fighter
    By the way mensa, you got any advice on what to do to get a dog to go "potty" when its raining? I have to pick mine up and carry him outside! He pees immediately once outdoors with no problem (the rain helps), but if he has to relieve his bowels..he will hold out forever. He would just as soon go on the living room carpet.
    well, yes and no. here are a few tips:

    1. always take your puppy on the same route and expect him to doodle (yes, that's code!) in the same spot. the same way that he'll learn that in the house is the wrong place, he'll learn that by a certain tree (or whatever) is the right place.

    2. get to know what your dog looks like just before he doodles. (my dog, for instance, walks differently his last few steps before doing it.) once you figure it out, when you're out there when it's not raining that is, you want to come up with a command for what he's gonna do. say it *before* he gets into position ("doodle!"). this is better with clicker training though (you'd click as he does his different walk or whatever). once the dog gets used to it, you can command him to go... the only problem is that you have to be sure that the dog needs to go, otherwise you're wasting time and confusing the dog. which leads to point 3...

    3. always feed your dog at the same time. he will more than likely doodle on schedule (assuming his diet doesn't change). however, there will be slight differences in time as the dog grows and his body changes.

    it just takes patience. don't ever hit the dog for doing his biz inside. if you catch a dog in the act, more than likely a loud NO will scare the pup enough to make him stop. you then pick him up and carry him outside (don't expect him to walk when he needs to pee or doodle). once outside, allow him to continue and praise him to the heavens.

    if you ever come home and your dog has done his biz inside, do not scold him! he'll have no idea what he's being punished for.

    there is also another trick, but i don't really recommend it as i think it's kind of degrading. ever wonder why dog's at dog shows never crap in the middle of the field? the reason is that the owners often utilize a little trick. they stick the end of a match in the dog's bum... the dog then feels uncomfortable and tries to force out the match, resulting in him crapping at the same time. however, again, these people know that the dog needs to do his business. they're just hurrying it along. however, i highly recommend you don't do this. good training is much better.

    as for your dog simply not wanting to go outside when it's raining, that's perfectly normal. most dogs (especially non-water or non-retriever dogs) don't really like the rain. mine hates it. he also doesn't like the snow at all.

    since people are no doubt getting sick of my dog talk, i'll also recommend that those that are following along and learning something do what i think is THE most important thing you can do for your dog: feed it properly.

    check out a book called "Food Pets Die For" (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...bosnation0e-20 ) to learn about the pet food industry. once that makes you sick to your stomach, do research on something called a BARF Diet (Bones And Raw Foods). (for instance, www.better-companions.com). there are also links to companies in other places (that one's in toronto.). the "our competition" section of www.theultimatediet.com is also informative (i wrote it).

    mc
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