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  1. #101  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    he may well be put on trial, be convicted, and go to jail -- but I continue to think that its unlikely to be on charges relating to these specific events.

    The abrupt manner by which these charges were brought, the news conference, the colorful ways in which the charges were described -- all of which likely transpired prior to actual overt actionable criminal deeds related to these allegations.

    Seating an unbiased jury will also be next to impossible -- especially in Illinois. This is a case that screams for a neutral, probably out of state, venue.

    If he does go to jail it will likely be for criminality separate and additional to the "Senatorial auction".

    For months he's been the target of wiretaps and investigations -- presumably if he's guilty of anything substantial they can document it profusely, and he'll be getting an orange jumpsuit as a goodbye gift.

    If not, he walks free.
    Rezko's sentencing has been delayed. I wonder why...

    Remember a "top level official" was identified by Rezko as involved in many questionable deals.

    BTW, Blagojevich just hired a high powered local attorney, Genson I think.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  2. #102  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    Rezko's sentencing has been delayed. I wonder why...

    Remember a "top level official" was identified by Rezko as involved in many questionable deals.

    BTW, Blagojevich just hired a high powered local attorney, Genson I think.

    ya, if Fitzgerald already had in his pocket sufficient evidence and testimony (ie Rezko) to bring criminal charges against Gov.BegoneyaBtch , he was probably much more likely to be as loose with appropriate procedure as he has been relative to the "auction" charges.

    If you're BegoneyaBtch, you have got to play the cards you still have -- historically politicians have regularly used their offices as a trading chip in negotiating with prosecutors -- most notoriously Spriro T Agnew, former GOP Vice President -- hero to the right, demagogue, and self confessed felon...
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  3. #103  
    my supposition in regards to the weakness of the underlying criminal case (relative to these specific indictments) is not BARYE's alone:


    Blagojevich Case, Is It a Crime, or Just Talk?
    By DAVID JOHNSTON

    WASHINGTON — When Patrick J. Fitzgerald, the United States attorney in Chicago, announced the arrest of the Illinois governor, Rod R. Blagojevich, Mr. Fitzgerald said he had acted to halt a political crime spree that included what he called an “appalling” effort to sell off the Senate seat vacated by President-elect Barack Obama.

    But now some lawyers are beginning to suggest that the juiciest part of the case against Mr. Blagojevich, the part involving the Senate seat, may be less than airtight. There is no evidence, at least none that has been disclosed, that the governor actually received anything of value — and the Senate appointment has yet to be made...

    “This town is full of people who call themselves ambassadors, and all they did was pay $200,000 or $300,000 to the Republican or Democratic Party,” said Mr. Bennett, referring to a passage in the criminal complaint filed against the governor suggesting that Mr. Blagojevich was interested in an ambassadorial appointment in return for the Senate seat. “You have to wonder, How much of this guy’s problem was his language, rather than what he really did?”...

    ...politicians routinely receive political contributions in return for their decisions, whether they involve making appointments or taking a stand on legislation.
    Lawmakers vote in favor of bills and steer appropriations backed by their donors without fear that prosecutors will bug their offices and homes...

    And while prosecutors have brought increasing numbers of political corruption cases in recent years, they have done so using laws that make it a crime for an official to deprive the public of “honest services.”...

    What those statutes do require is evidence that an official at least tried to seek something of value in return for an official action...

    ... the government has claimed the wiretaps show that Mr. Blagojevich told his aides that he wanted to offer the seat in exchange for contributions and for personal favors, including jobs for himself and his wife.

    But talk is not enough. Any case will ultimately turn on the strength of the tapes, and whether the governor made it clear to any of the candidates for the Senate seat that he would give it only in exchange for something of value...

    In moving to arrest Mr. Blagojevich on Dec. 9, Mr. Fitzgerald acted without having presented his case before a grand jury...

    Mr. Fitzgerald’s decision to bypass a grand jury initially could signal a belief on his part that he did not yet have a fully prosecutable case on his hand...

    Mr. Fitzgerald has also said he had been worried that if he did not intervene, Mr. Blagojevich might go ahead with some of his schemes, including appointing a successor to Mr. Obama.

    In the wiretaps cited in the complaint, Mr. Blagojevich talked about what he said was an urgent need for political contributions and favors, but it was not clear whether he took concerted action to actually obtain anything in return for the seat. Several lawyers said Mr. Fitzgerald might need more evidence to prosecute Mr. Blagojevich over the issue.

    “It’s a very difficult case for a number of reasons; not the least is the nebulous nature of the charges and the inherently difficult issues when you’re talking about a person executing his First Amendment right to promote a particular politician,”...

    “Merely thinking about something is not a crime,”...“Just talking about something is not a crime. You need another action for someone to commit a crime.”
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  4. #104  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    my supposition in regards to the weakness of the underlying criminal case (relative to these specific indictments) is not BARYE's alone:


    Blagojevich Case, Is It a Crime, or Just Talk?
    By DAVID JOHNSTON

    WASHINGTON — When Patrick J. Fitzgerald, the United States attorney in Chicago, announced the arrest of the Illinois governor, Rod R. Blagojevich, Mr. Fitzgerald said he had acted to halt a political crime spree that included what he called an “appalling” effort to sell off the Senate seat vacated by President-elect Barack Obama.

    But now some lawyers are beginning to suggest that the juiciest part of the case against Mr. Blagojevich, the part involving the Senate seat, may be less than airtight. There is no evidence, at least none that has been disclosed, that the governor actually received anything of value — and the Senate appointment has yet to be made...

    “This town is full of people who call themselves ambassadors, and all they did was pay $200,000 or $300,000 to the Republican or Democratic Party,” said Mr. Bennett, referring to a passage in the criminal complaint filed against the governor suggesting that Mr. Blagojevich was interested in an ambassadorial appointment in return for the Senate seat. “You have to wonder, How much of this guy’s problem was his language, rather than what he really did?”...

    ...politicians routinely receive political contributions in return for their decisions, whether they involve making appointments or taking a stand on legislation.
    Lawmakers vote in favor of bills and steer appropriations backed by their donors without fear that prosecutors will bug their offices and homes...

    And while prosecutors have brought increasing numbers of political corruption cases in recent years, they have done so using laws that make it a crime for an official to deprive the public of “honest services.”...

    What those statutes do require is evidence that an official at least tried to seek something of value in return for an official action...

    ... the government has claimed the wiretaps show that Mr. Blagojevich told his aides that he wanted to offer the seat in exchange for contributions and for personal favors, including jobs for himself and his wife.

    But talk is not enough. Any case will ultimately turn on the strength of the tapes, and whether the governor made it clear to any of the candidates for the Senate seat that he would give it only in exchange for something of value...

    In moving to arrest Mr. Blagojevich on Dec. 9, Mr. Fitzgerald acted without having presented his case before a grand jury...

    Mr. Fitzgerald’s decision to bypass a grand jury initially could signal a belief on his part that he did not yet have a fully prosecutable case on his hand...

    Mr. Fitzgerald has also said he had been worried that if he did not intervene, Mr. Blagojevich might go ahead with some of his schemes, including appointing a successor to Mr. Obama.

    In the wiretaps cited in the complaint, Mr. Blagojevich talked about what he said was an urgent need for political contributions and favors, but it was not clear whether he took concerted action to actually obtain anything in return for the seat. Several lawyers said Mr. Fitzgerald might need more evidence to prosecute Mr. Blagojevich over the issue.

    “It’s a very difficult case for a number of reasons; not the least is the nebulous nature of the charges and the inherently difficult issues when you’re talking about a person executing his First Amendment right to promote a particular politician,”...

    “Merely thinking about something is not a crime,”...“Just talking about something is not a crime. You need another action for someone to commit a crime.”
    The whole thing is ugly and stupid (flat out moronic) but I don't think it made it to criminal.

    However, I do feel that he's been tarnished beyond repair and there are other issues involved so he should still step down in my opinion.
    Grant Smith
    A+, Net+, MCPx2, BSIT/VC, MIS

    eNVENT Technologies
    Use your imagination.
    --
    Sprint HTC Evo 4G

    DISCLAIMER: The views, conclusions, findings and opinions of this author are those of this author and do not necessarily reflect the views of eNVENT Technologies.
  5. #105  
    Some other legal experts have also said talk isn't enough, you must initiate the action to get convicted. I do think though, that this is the icing on the cake of a LONG investigation. That guy who was prosecuted with Rezko also supposedly confirmed Blagojevich did some ethically dirty deals. The prosecutors may indeed have thought he was about to go way too far this time and jumped in before anything could happen. I don't know. But it really doesn't look good for him now. Even if he does get cleared on not only this but those other allegations, he will never be viewed as upstanding by anyone (except maybe family) again. Just as Mr. Smith said.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  6. #106  
    I predict their will be some great behind the scenes discussions about Blagojevich and his wife (with her real-estate dealings).

    He will eventually resign, but not without securing a deal for him and his wife....

    He was done when they arrested him.

    And Jessie Jackson Jr. is done as well...

    Obama was the smart one again... avoiding Blagojevich like the plague... way before this stuff came to light.
    01000010 01100001 01101110 00100000 01010100 01101000 01110010 01100101 01100001 01100100 00100000 01000011 01110010 01100001 01110000 01110000 01100101 01110010 01110011 00100001
  7. #107  
    Jackson Jr. is now claimed to have been speaking with the Feds for a long time about Blagojevich.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  8. #108  
    Watching the news now. Looks like the Illinois Supreme Court has flat out denied Lisa Madigan's request.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
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