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  1.    #1  
    I have recently spent some time looking at Linux. Looked around, did some reading, and now a question about opinions from real live people. The computer I am wanting to install it on is a 17" Acer laptop running Windows Vista Home Premium.

    Opinions on builds/flavors, and general opinions. I am looking at a complete desktop.

    Thanks!
  2. #2  
    There are many that are free and have decents desktops.

    I use fedora which had RedHat underneath.
  3. #3  
    Here is a link to a ZDNet story that has some reviews of the paopluar ones:

    blogs.zdnet.com/perlow/?p=9283&tag=nl.e550

    The story is titled:

    Surviving the recession with Free Linux distributions (Part 1)
  4. #4  
    I personally use openSuSE11 on my P4 2ghz Sony Vaio. I also use a super lightweight distro called antix on an old PII 400, as well as an old PII 350 at work. My home desktop is also running openSuSE 11.

    Here is a link that can answer most of the questions you have about most of the Linux distros out there... distrowatch.com

    At this time I also recommend that you stay away from KDE 4.x. For a first time Linux install I would say try Ubuntu or openSuSE. Both are pretty easy to install, have tons of options you can choose from for a complete dekstop install, and both have large user communities.

    Ubuntu can be found here: ubuntu.com
    openSuSE can be found here: opensuse.org/en

    Try either or both, but first try the Live CD version of both before you wipe your system to install Linux. That way if you dont like it, then you arent out anything but a little time testing, but that's my .02.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by bclinger View Post
    I have recently spent some time looking at Linux. Looked around, did some reading, and now a question about opinions from real live people. The computer I am wanting to install it on is a 17" Acer laptop running Windows Vista Home Premium.

    Opinions on builds/flavors, and general opinions. I am looking at a complete desktop.

    Thanks!
    Ubuntu... that is by far the best distro out for "regular people" and "newbies."

    I would download sun's virtual pc (it is free) and try out the different linux builds in that before installing on a real computer.

    Virtual pcs are a great way to test new programs or OSs without messing up your current computer.

    Good luck...
    01000010 01100001 01101110 00100000 01010100 01101000 01110010 01100101 01100001 01100100 00100000 01000011 01110010 01100001 01110000 01110000 01100101 01110010 01110011 00100001
  6.    #6  
    Thank you to all. I have read the various links above, though thank you for reposting them. The actual end user, similar to those here is what I will base my choice on and so far Ubuntu is the one I am favoring.

    Again, thank you!
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by theog View Post
    Ubuntu... that is by far the best distro out for "regular people" and "newbies."
    I keep reading that, but personally found much better results from Fedora--particularly regarding online support from other users. This is why I keep going back to them. Although my friend in Indiana is really liking K(u)buntu (unsure of proper spelling, but Ubuntu with KDE instead of Gnome).





    If you want to look at different flavors, check out the differing LiveCD versions. I can't remember all of them, but off the top of my head I know that Fedora and Knoppix have one. I wouldn't suggest Knoppix personally for new person.

    I did have positive results from XandrOS, which so far has been the only version to pick up my wireless card without any add-ons.
    No problem should ever be solved twice.

    Verizon Treo650 W/Custom ROM
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by DL.Cummings View Post
    I keep reading that, but personally found much better results from Fedora--particularly regarding online support from other users. This is why I keep going back to them. Although my friend in Indiana is really liking K(u)buntu (unsure of proper spelling, but Ubuntu with KDE instead of Gnome).





    If you want to look at different flavors, check out the differing LiveCD versions. I can't remember all of them, but off the top of my head I know that Fedora and Knoppix have one. I wouldn't suggest Knoppix personally for new person.

    I did have positive results from XandrOS, which so far has been the only version to pick up my wireless card without any add-ons.

    To be clear... I've not tried many linux distros... I've only found ubuntu to give me less fits when installing for friends and customers when they request/"need" linux. Ubuntu finds wireless and all other hardware... I've had a couple of issues here and there over the years, but I can't complain much. It is not perfect... but it is closer than anything I ever tried in linux.

    My preference is windows xp on a desktop and windows vista on a laptop. I've dealt with linux since the late 90s or so, but I don't use it on a day to day basis.
    01000010 01100001 01101110 00100000 01010100 01101000 01110010 01100101 01100001 01100100 00100000 01000011 01110010 01100001 01110000 01110000 01100101 01110010 01110011 00100001
  9. #9  
    For a desktop user, you should stick with either Fedora or Ubuntu. Your issue with Linux is always going to be user communities. They are your lifeblood when there's a support issue. Right now, Ubuntu is a popular distro, so there are going to be lots of resources. Fedora, being that it's forked from RedHat, has a big userbase to draw from. If it were me, I'd go with Fedora, but I'm biased because I've been working with RedHat since the 90s. Fedora is pretty much all I use when I use Linux (mostly LAMP and Clonezilla installs at this point). Also, Ubuntu is big now, but so were Caldera and SuSE at differing points (well, SuSE is still significant because of Novell, but Caldera was screwed by SCO), but they don't seem to be that popular on the desktop anymore. Personally, my desktops are either XP Pro (home) or OS X with Parallels (work). I love OS X because I get the best of *nix with the slickest of UIs.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Toby View Post
    For a desktop user, you should stick with either Fedora or Ubuntu. Your issue with Linux is always going to be user communities. They are your lifeblood when there's a support issue. Right now, Ubuntu is a popular distro, so there are going to be lots of resources. Fedora, being that it's forked from RedHat, has a big userbase to draw from. If it were me, I'd go with Fedora, but I'm biased because I've been working with RedHat since the 90s. Fedora is pretty much all I use when I use Linux (mostly LAMP and Clonezilla installs at this point). Also, Ubuntu is big now, but so were Caldera and SuSE at differing points (well, SuSE is still significant because of Novell, but Caldera was screwed by SCO), but they don't seem to be that popular on the desktop anymore. Personally, my desktops are either XP Pro (home) or OS X with Parallels (work). I love OS X because I get the best of *nix with the slickest of UIs.
    I beg to differ on the SuSE. SuSE is owned and maintained by Novell, as openSuSE is maintained by the community. The openSuSE comminuty is quite large and going strong. Check out susegeek.com, for any questions you have on it... They do a lot of tips, and tricks to help anyine along.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by timmy_o_tool View Post
    I beg to differ on the SuSE. SuSE is owned and maintained by Novell, as openSuSE is maintained by the community. The openSuSE comminuty is quite large and going strong. Check out susegeek.com, for any questions you have on it... They do a lot of tips, and tricks to help anyine along.
    Don't get me wrong. I didn't mean that SuSE was gone, but that it doesn't seem to have the mindshare on the desktop that it once did. For a while there, they had the best installer routine going. I don't really know anyone who runs SuSE, like I do Fedora or Ubuntu. After Novell bought them, the 'cool factor' didn't seem to be there anymore. Nice to see that they have a Fedora-like fork now.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  12.    #12  
    Oh, gosh! This input from real live users is appreciated. Down to 2 choices now. Thank you.
  13. #13  
    I've always loved debian (and debian based distros). Apt is, imho, far and away the best way to install and uninstall software.

    Let's bring up support. Even if you go w/a distro designed for *nix beginners, such as ubuntu, the support that you'll get is very different than what you've become accustomed. People almost invariably do not like being someone else's google. Almost every error or conundrum you run into will have been asked and answered already - so give an honest effort to find that answer. If you can't, hop into an IRC room. The "which distro" question is an example. My suggestion is to try your 'finalists' for a week. It's not as though there are any restrictions for doing so, and this is an environment with which you want to become proficient. You aren't going to choose a "dead-end." Even if the distro you like kicks off, the foundation your distro was based on (more than likely) will not. Debian and Red Hat aren't going anywhere.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by theog View Post
    To be clear... I've not tried many linux distros... I've only found ubuntu to give me less fits when installing for friends and customers when they request/"need" linux.
    Basically what I read elsewhere and I've not had problems much with Ubuntu as a distro itself, I really was sucked in by what I felt was better support for Fedora (fedoraforum.org).

    Ubuntu finds wireless and all other hardware... I've had a couple of issues here and there over the years, but I can't complain much.
    The only issue I've ever had was with my wireless adapter for my laptop--but I've had it with all the versions I've tried (Fedora, Ubuntu, DSL [okay, maybe that one's not really fair], Knoppix & Mandriva), with XandrOS being the exception. To be fair, I probably wouldn't even count my wireless woes against Linux.
    No problem should ever be solved twice.

    Verizon Treo650 W/Custom ROM

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