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  1.    #1  
    Hi folks,

    Maybe you guys can give me some advice. I have had DSL since mid April, (I won't torture you about the time before April)and I've had a million problems, like today if I could connect, and the phone rings it throws me off of DSL. But most of the time the ready light is blinking.
    My ready light on the modem is NOT blinking at this time but I still can't connect. It gives me the error message, " Time out while trying to connect to server."
    At this time I'm still able to use my analog modem with the MSN I never had turned off just in case, cause of the DSL problems.
    I am not technical, so please, be kind. Oh, yea before ya ask, I have a running log I keep when I talk to tech support. They always say I'm out of sync and they will write up a trouble ticket and get back in 48 to 72 hours. They actually called once.

    I Must Be Online!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It's sad but that's my life.

    Thanx in advance
  2. #2  
    I have DSL, and may be able to help. So, I offer some things to try or think about.
    I don't know if every DSL service is the same setup; I have Verizon (in NY), and they have a connection utility program I have to run in order to connect.

    1) first and foremost: double-check that the IP address and Ethernet setups are correct.

    2) I've had intermittant service "cut-outs" where the connection drops without any indication that it did so. The quick-n-dirty solution is to disconnect/reconnect with the connection software.

    3) you're in California; could the rolling blackouts be affecting it? (Pardon my ignorance, I don't even know if that's still going on; news on that subject stopped around the time the McVie thing started up again)

    4) I've also had the ready light flash in the middle of a session, but most of the time it doesn't kill my connection. If I stop trying to do things for a couple minutes, until the light is steady again, I'm fine.

    5) check that *ALL* of the phone jacks *except* the one used for the DSL line have the DSL filter(s) on them.You can put the filters on splitters, too; i.e. the DSL line is on one splitter jack, the DSL filter is on the other and the phone or next splitter connects to that.

    6) yesterday I got the time-out error when I tried to reconnect following a crash. Resetting the modem didn't help. Restarting the computer again did. I'm using a Macintosh and the Ethernet extension hadn't loaded for some reason.

    7) finally, it's just possible you're on the fringe of the service area, in which case the problem might not be you, but distance from the switching station. (or so I'm told.)

    hope that helps some.
    The light at the end of your tunnel has been disconnected due to non-payment. Please remit funds immediately for restoration of hope.
  3. #3  
    Hi,
    A couple of tips from my DSL provider:

    1: Make sure the DSL modem is the only thing plugged into that outlet. No other phones or answering machines or DirecTV boxes.

    2: If things don't work- turn everything off, then turn the modem on and then turn the computer back on.

    3: If you have software you use to connect make sure that it is set correctly. I have my DSL networked with a Router and Ethernet Hub. For some reason the set up forgets the information I put in such as sign on ID and password if there is a power surge.

    I have a good DSL company. I called them for help on Father's Day since I couldn't connect. They called back later the same day(They had a server problem after a software upgrade so it wasn't a problem with my computer).

    Brian
  4.    #4  
    Thanx for getting back to me guys. There is a zillion things plugged into the strip with the DSL modem I think. I need to get behind my desk to see.
    Anyway I'm so glad you have a good DSL company. I have PacBell. I want to believe they are good. I'm beginning to think that I could have a faulty modem?
    This whole thing was self installation. If I could get a REAL person out here, that might help. But that seems impossible.

    Anyway I will print both of your responses and study them to see if I can use them to try something.

    Thanx again
  5.    #5  
    Okay, this is the latest. I unplugged the modem(power) and shut down the computer and this time it's working. I just hope no one calls right now

    Anybody got an idea how I could get a live body from PacBell out here?
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by busesrkool
    Anybody got an idea how I could get a live body from PacBell out here?
    dark van, ski mask, lunch hour. drive up and snatch 'em like in that car ad.

    seriously, you could request an on-site visit, but I'll bet it'll cost you money.
    If possible, try taking the modem to a PacBell office and asking if someone could test it?
    Or, if you're lucky, maybe you can find another DSL customer and see how their service has been.
    The light at the end of your tunnel has been disconnected due to non-payment. Please remit funds immediately for restoration of hope.
  7.    #7  
    Yes, The latter is what I would like to end up doing, but your first statement is what I would like to do now!!

    I don't know anyone in this area let alone someone who has DSL.

    But It's up this morning, so it's a good day at my house.

    Thanx Yorick


    _____________

    If you're not outraged, you're not paying attention
  8. #8  
    First of all, ALL DSL providers in this country, at this time, are the major phone monopolies. They all suck. They really do.

    The independant DSL providers still need to contract service throught the phone monopolies, so they are at their mercy as well.

    So, just to let you know, you are not alone.

    It sounds like your problem is two-fold, or at least has syptoms of two issues.

    The first is if you get knocked off the DSL when the phone rings, it sounds like you do not have all of your analog devices filtered. When you set up DSL, you should get these filters that you need to connect between all of your analog devices (phones, faxes, analog modems, etc). If you do not have those, it the analog device can cause enough interference on the line to drop the DSL.

    The other issue is that it sounds like your WAN light isn't always on...which means it is not connected to the ISP's WAN and/or the DSL connection to your ISP's WAN. This could be ANYTHING between your DSL modem and the dsl card at the main switching center and from there, to the ISP. Which could be up to 3 miles of cable. This is a futile fix...and I'd recommend that if you can't get PacBal to fix it, switch to cable.

    I've installed DSL 3 times in 3 locations through USWorst (now Qwest). All 3 times have been royal pains in the ***. I typically need to troubleshoot the situation myself. Which can take weeks.

    My favorite argument with them is when they tried to explain that I need to have Netscape Navigator installed for my DSL to work. Sadly, I have plenty other stories just like that one...

    I wish you luck!

    Let's all pray that wireless high-speed internet becomes affordable REAL soon! ;o)
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by homer:
    [...] The independant DSL providers still need to contract service throught the phone monopolies, so they are at their mercy as well. [...]


    Well, actually, you're at the mercy of the federal government and your regional/local regulating entity. Whatever the telco charges has to be run by them.

    Let's all pray that wireless high-speed internet becomes affordable REAL soon! ;o)

    Its affordability is moot to me
    unless its deployment reaches ubiquity.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  10. #10  
    Well, actually, you're at the mercy of the federal government and your regional/local regulating entity. Whatever the telco charges has to be run by them.
    I'm not talking about pricing, but about how they do business. They purposely cripple competitors who ARE trying to offer good DSL service. Bascially, they are a governement approved monopoly. They do not need to fix your DSL because you have no other options for DSL. They'll take their own sweet time.

    Its affordability is moot to me
    unless its deployment reaches ubiquity.
    Well, that's sort of here already. Sattelite internet (via DishNetwork) is already here and can be used anywhere in the country, provided you can see south.

    Technology like Ricochet is also very appealing, once it hits most major metropolitan areas.

    The phone and cable companies really don't stand a chance in competing with wireless technologies. Give the wireless industry a year or two and there will be little, if any, appeal to DSL and Cable modems.
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by homer


    The phone and cable companies really don't stand a chance in competing with wireless technologies. Give the wireless industry a year or two and there will be little, if any, appeal to DSL and Cable modems.
    As long as you don't mind anyone being able to grab your data as it passes through the air. Most wireless "security" is a joke right now. While I realize that people can (and do) snoop on a wired connection, it is a bit tougher to do, and you can better protect your self than with a wireless connection. Until wireless companies start to take this more seriously, I prefer a wired connection. I don't do anything that needs to be hidden, I just don't want anyone to know that.
    Sven

    If at first you do succeed, try not to look astonished.
  12. #12  
    As long as you don't mind anyone being able to grab your data as it passes through the air.
    Well, landlines are just as insecure...especially via DSL and Cable...catching other's packets is quite easy. That said, it is a valid concern. And one that should be addressed seriously.
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by homer:
    I'm not talking about pricing, but about how they do business.


    The same thing applies.

    They purposely cripple competitors who ARE trying to offer good DSL service.

    And where is the regulating entity when this is going on?

    Bascially, they are a governement approved monopoly.

    Exactly my point. The government is ultimately the one to blame because nearly everything that a telco does has to be approved by their particular regulating agency. I work for an ILEC, and some of the regulations on the 'business' are downright ridiculous (having to depreciate computers over seven years is the one that always immediately springs to mind).

    They do not need to fix your DSL because you have no other options for DSL. They'll take their own sweet time.

    A call to the local Public Service Commissioner can get that expedited.

    Well, that's sort of here already. Sattelite internet (via DishNetwork) is already here and can be used anywhere in the country, provided you can see south.

    And provided the weather's not interfering. I love my DSS system, but I don't consider it reliable enough to use for internet access (I have the same feelings about cable).

    The phone and cable companies really don't stand a chance in competing with wireless technologies. Give the wireless industry a year or two and there will be little, if any, appeal to DSL and Cable modems.

    Unless you don't live in one of those major metropolitan areas.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  14. #14  
    And where is the regulating entity when this is going on?
    I believe they are gathered in a back alley in the bad part of D.C. accepting a brown paper bag filled with a few thousand unmarked $20's from a man in a limousine with the words ATT on the license plate.

    Exactly my point. The government is ultimately the one to blame because nearly everything that a telco does has to be approved by their particular regulating agency.
    Well, yes and no. These telcos could do a LOT to improve customer service themselves. Namely, they could track trouble tickets, they could offer honest answers, they could simply empathize with the caller, they could hire a few more support people, etc...

    A call to the local Public Service Commissioner can get that expedited.
    Thanks. Good idea. Another good idea is to LOG EVERYTHING! You may even want to get a phone recorder to record ALL conversations with the Telco. I've leaned that the hard way.

    I love my DSS system, but I don't consider it reliable enough to use for internet access (I have the same feelings about cable).
    And I have the same feelings about DSL

    Unless you don't live in one of those major metropolitan areas.
    Well, two technologies will probably affect the rural population...microwave and satellite. Satellite connections will only improve, and microwave antennaes, already in wide spread use in Canada, will be ideal on the plains of the mid-west for high-speed connections.

    If you live in a valley in the Rockies, well, then I think you'll be waiting a bit longer for acceptable high-speed solutions.
    We're all naked if you turn us inside out.
    -David Byrne
  15. #15  
    Originally posted by homer:
    I believe they are gathered in a back alley in the bad part of D.C. accepting a brown paper bag filled with a few thousand unmarked $20's from a man in a limousine with the words ATT on the license plate.


    LOL...well the ones that cover ATT might, but the ones here are pretty accessible.

    Well, yes and no. These telcos could do a LOT to improve customer service themselves.

    No doubt, but there is an entity that can turn the screws to them if they get enough complaints. Politicians are always after the votes. Their business is getting re-elected, after all.

    Namely, they could track trouble tickets, they could offer honest answers, they could simply empathize with the caller, they could hire a few more support people, etc...

    That would require a soul.

    Thanks. Good idea. Another good idea is to LOG EVERYTHING! You may even want to get a phone recorder to record ALL conversations with the Telco. I've leaned that the hard way.

    Excellent idea. You'd probably want to check into your local laws before doing it, though.

    And I have the same feelings about DSL

    LOL...well, the problem with DSS is technology more than implementation. I suspect that DSL is vice versa (given my own anecdotal experiences).

    Well, two technologies will probably affect the rural population...microwave and satellite. Satellite connections will only improve, and microwave antennaes, already in wide spread use in Canada, will be ideal on the plains of the mid-west for high-speed connections.

    Satellite is limited by one critical factor, though: line-of-sight. Unless we find a way to control the atmosphere, I don't think there's a way around that issue. Microwave eliminates that issue, but adds its own question marks regarding potential health effects.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  16. #16  
    Generally speaking, a party to a conversation is allowed to tape it, although lawyers are restricted from doing this.

    Or that's my understanding, anyway...
  17. #17  
    Originally posted by K. Cannon:
    Generally speaking, a party to a conversation is allowed to tape it, although lawyers are restricted from doing this.

    Or that's my understanding, anyway...


    It varies from state to state. Some states require informed consent as well.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by Toby
    It varies from state to state. Some states require informed consent as well.
    True, true. Also, there is a Federal Wiretapping Statute, but that doesn't seem to be at issue here (as I don't expect homer to be seeking authorization for a true wiretapping)

    Some cites:
    "It shall not be unlawful under this chapter for a person acting under color of law to intercept a wire, oral, or electronic communication, where such person is a party to the communication or one of the parties to the communication has given prior consent to such interception."
    18 U.S.C.A. 2511(2)(c) (Supp.1996).
    "The federal courts have unanimously held that where one party to a conversation consents to the call being taped, there is no violation of the Fourth Amendment." State v. Pulido, 68 Wash.App. 59, 841 P.2d 1251 (App.1992). See United States v. White, 401 U.S. 745, 752, 91 S.Ct. 1122, 1126, 28 L.Ed.2d 453, 459 (1971)

    Added helpful citations
    Last edited by K. Cannon; 07/02/2001 at 01:19 PM.

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