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  1.    #1  
    Here's a question for you techies out there. If you were leaving your laptop at home for a month while traveling, would you remove the battery? Or does it really matter?
  2. #2  
    Leave it plugged in and off.

    Battery technology today wants to stay topped off for longer life.
  3.    #3  
    Thanks for the quick response daThomas!

    That is almost exactly the opposite of what I thought. I don't know where I heard or read this, but I thought it was bad to keep a laptop plugged in and that it lowered the use time of the battery. Instead you were supposed to make sure and completely "cycle" the battery; charge it, then run it all the way down before charging it again. Did I just dream that or does that sound familiar to you or anyone else? Seems like keeping it plugged in for a month would be the worst version of that?
  4. #4  
    Leaving for a month...

    I'd leave the battery in but the laptop unplugged.

    I often leave for up to two to three weeks and unplug everything in the house that can be unplugged... never know. Won't hurt anything to leave it unplugged.
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  5. #5  
    I'd leave the battery in the laptop, but not plug-in to charge. Like theog said, I too normally unplug everything that can be unplugged...

    - mvk
  6. #6  
    Leave it unplugged.
    One, you don't waste energy (albeit a tiny amount, it's the principle of not wasting) and two, you avoid damage to the laptop from power surges (thunderstorm can be a pain) and three, you will prolong battery life. Removing the battery from the laptop is not necessary.
  7. #7  
    I'm curious as to the foundation of many of the answers provided here. How many are taking into account the dynamics of battery chemistry? Anyone have any actual experience leaving a laptop unplugged/plugged for a month and then firing it up?

    That being said, how old is the laptop? What type of battery does it use (e.g. NiMH, LiIon, etc.)?
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by eTreo View Post
    Thanks for the quick response daThomas!

    That is almost exactly the opposite of what I thought. I don't know where I heard or read this, but I thought it was bad to keep a laptop plugged in and that it lowered the use time of the battery. Instead you were supposed to make sure and completely "cycle" the battery; charge it, then run it all the way down before charging it again. Did I just dream that or does that sound familiar to you or anyone else? Seems like keeping it plugged in for a month would be the worst version of that?
    Older battery technology was best drained then recharged, Current batts are best left topped off. Unfortunately I don't have the chemistry degree to tell you why as previous posts have pointed out. Also, there is the aspect of wasting energy when you are gone. I'm not sure how much it would actually use turned off though charging for a month versus off and losing power.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by eTreo View Post
    Instead you were supposed to make sure and completely "cycle" the battery; charge it, then run it all the way down before charging it again.
    I think that's with NiCd batteries and it has to do with the "memory effect".

    Current generation batteries don't require such conditioning. In-fact it appears to be quiet the opposite. My laptop (Vaio) for example has a "battery save" feature... when enabled, it maintains the battery at 50% charge. (The battery save feature is recommended to be enabled when the laptop is expected to be used on A/C power for extended periods).

    This leads me to believe that with newer types of batteries, the life is determined by the number of charge-discharge cycles... i.e., it is better to limit the number of charge-discharge cycles.
    Game over!
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas View Post
    Older battery technology was best drained then recharged, Current batts are best left topped off. Unfortunately I don't have the chemistry degree to tell you why as previous posts have pointed out. Also, there is the aspect of wasting energy when you are gone. I'm not sure how much it would actually use turned off though charging for a month versus off and losing power.
    You don't need a chemistry degree. I was simply referring to the fact that different battery types have different recommendations. Since we don't know the age of the laptop, it's hard to give a definitive answer. AAMOF, I'd generally go with your answer for most laptops less than a year or two old since they more than likely use LiIon batteries, which do not do so well with deep discharges. If it were my laptop, I'd leave it turned off and plugged in.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  11. #11  
    Send your laptop to me for a month and I will keep it cared for.


    Personally, I wouldn't worry much past leaving it in the laptop and not plugged in. Nope, no technical reason, just that it doesn't really seem to me that it will really matter all that much.

    Unless someone can explain what differences you can expect from doing it this way or that way.

    I suspect any differences from this advice will be negligable and I'm dubious that you will even notice.
    No problem should ever be solved twice.

    Verizon Treo650 W/Custom ROM
  12. #12  
    There are cases where defective charging circuitry might not prevent an overcharge situation and the battery may expand, leak, or even 'explode'.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...

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