View Poll Results: Who Is Currently Our Number One Enemy? (and why)

Voters
25. You may not vote on this poll
  • China

    9 36.00%
  • Iraq

    0 0%
  • Iran

    8 32.00%
  • North Korea

    0 0%
  • Russia

    0 0%
  • Another Country (please share who below)

    8 32.00%
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  1.    #1  
    I thought many aspects of this national poll was very interesting. Who do you personally consider our number one enemy at the moment?

    I thought several points were interesting. It found that Rep thought that Iran was the number one enemy while Dems thought Iraq was more likely to name Iraq as the number one enemy. Yet we see the Rep saying we need to stay in Iraq and the Dems saying we need to run from Iraq as soon as possible.

    With the promised, though unfullfilled, agreements we have made with NK, it has now dropped down the list with China now back in the number 3 spot. I just hope that NK is not pulling the wool over our eyes again just like they did when Clinton made the previous deal with them for aid.

    China has been playing dirty economic pool while taking huge steps in ramping up their military forces, both without much explanations.

    Is this really a party line answer?

    So again, who do you think is our current number one enemy and why?

    Poll: Americans call Iran, Iraq, China top enemies
    WASHINGTON (AP) — China has replaced North Korea as one of the top three U.S. enemies, according to a poll of Americans.
    Iran topped the list, with 25% naming it when asked which country is the greatest U.S. enemy, according to the Gallup Poll. Iraq came next at 22%, then China with 14%.

    North Korea was named by 9% — half the number who cited it a year earlier. Pyongyang agreed last year to disable its nuclear facilities in exchange for aid, though disputes have continued over implementing the deal.

    China, a growing economic rival of the U.S., was cited by 11% as top enemy a year ago.

    Gallup first asked the question in early 2001, before the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11. At the time, Iraq was seen as the biggest foe, followed by China and Iran.

    Iraq has remained one of the most frequently named ever since, even though Saddam Hussein was overthrown and the current Baghdad government is backed by the U.S.

    Republicans are more than twice as likely as Democrats to see Iran as the top U.S. enemy, while Democrats are likelier to name Iraq. Older people and those who say they closely follow world news are less likely to cite Iraq than the younger and less informed.

    No other country was named by more than 3%.

    The poll was conducted from Feb. 11-14 and involved telephone interviews with 1,007 adults. The margin of sampling error was plus or minus 3 percentage points.

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/...s_N.htm?csp=15
    Last edited by HobbesIsReal; 03/31/2008 at 08:36 PM.
  2. #2  
    How about India?

    This is interesting, the USA (and its people) need to have an "enemy" country to feel good about itself and to help itself along.

    I mean, grow up!
  3. #3  
    You forgot "Ourselves".
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenHex View Post
    How about India?

    This is interesting, the USA (and its people) need to have an "enemy" country to feel good about itself and to help itself along.

    I mean, grow up!
    exactly !!

    how about dem Indians ??

    Though BARYE likes being thought of as a pioneer -- he's gettin mighty damn impatient with all dem arrows in his arse -- I say we take their darn casinos, put them all back onto reservations where they belong !! Darn foriegners !!
    Last edited by BARYE; 04/01/2008 at 03:55 AM.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenHex View Post
    This is interesting, the USA (and its people) need to have an "enemy" country to feel good about itself and to help itself along.
    Nah, it's the jingoism that makes me feel good; the enemy part is just icing on the cake.
    No problem should ever be solved twice.

    Verizon Treo650 W/Custom ROM
  6. #6  
    5 votes (71%) for Iran... They became an "enemy" when they decided to trade oil in Euros... or so I've been told.
  7. #7  
    I think it is quite clear who public enemy number one is here in the USA...


    ...and that enemy is obviously...


    ...Janet Jackson's breast.


    Oh okay...I'll settle on Rev. Wright.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas View Post
    You forgot "Ourselves".
    My answer as well
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by moderateinny View Post
    I think it is quite clear who public enemy number one is here in the USA...


    ...and that enemy is obviously...


    ...Janet Jackson's breast.


    Oh okay...I'll settle on Rev. Wright.

    exactly Wright !!
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  10.    #10  
    DaThomas & Shop...

    ...a lot of times when I see an answer like this it is often times a politically aligned or biased answer. For example a lot of time when a Rep says that they really mean something like the Dem party is our own worse enemy because they just want to talk to the enemy and not stand up to them and want to socialize the nation to the ground. Or a lot of the time when a Dem says that they really mean something like the Rep is our own worse enemy because they are all hawkish saber rattling warmongers and relish in corp greed to the point of breaking our economy.

    On the flip side if you look at history, this may not be too far from the truth for either side's opinion. Throughout history there are loads of examples that due mainly to internal strife, selfish power grabbing, personal greed at the expense of the public, etc... that whole nations and empires have fallen.

    This would be a valid and very interesting topic as it's own thread.

    But I am curious what each of you think is the most EXTERNAL threat we face now in the world today.
  11.    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenHex View Post
    5 votes (71%) for Iran... They became an "enemy" when they decided to trade oil in Euros... or so I've been told.
    I am not for sure, but maybe being caught after 20 years of hiding the extent of their nuke program, threatening to wipe Israel off the face of the earth (with part of it's justification by holding a convention to prove that the Holocaust never really happened), potentially supporting the surge in Iraq with supplies for bombs that are being used against innocent civilians and our own troops, refusing to comply with the international community be ignoring 4 UN resolutions to stop their nuke program, their gov leaders chanting "Kill America" during public speeches, and kicking out the IAEA to confirm their claimed innocence has something to do with it currently being on top of the list right now.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenHex View Post
    This is interesting, the USA (and its people) need to have an "enemy" country to feel good about itself... ...grow up!
    It's is more sad then interesting and, unfortunately, it seems to be VERY true...

    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas View Post
    You forgot "Ourselves".
    Agreed...
    Grant Smith
    A+, Net+, MCPx2, BSIT/VC, MIS

    eNVENT Technologies
    Use your imagination.
    --
    Sprint HTC Evo 4G

    DISCLAIMER: The views, conclusions, findings and opinions of this author are those of this author and do not necessarily reflect the views of eNVENT Technologies.
  13.    #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenHex View Post
    This is interesting, the USA (and its people) need to have an "enemy" country to feel good about itself and to help itself along.

    I mean, grow up!
    There are real threats in the world today. Do you feel it is not important to be aware of any possible threats? Or is it practical to pretty much ignore them and let them do their thing?
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by HobbesIsReal View Post
    There are real threats in the world today. Do you feel it is not important to be aware of any possible threats? Or is it practical to pretty much ignore them and let them do their thing?
    It is important to pay attention to threats, yes, but to feel the need to point our aggression at a nation and say you are my number one enemy is just silly. If we want to call out our number one enemy, I say it is pretty independent of nation... I say it is radicalism / fundamentalism in general and it is everywhere in the world including the good ol' US of A.
    Grant Smith
    A+, Net+, MCPx2, BSIT/VC, MIS

    eNVENT Technologies
    Use your imagination.
    --
    Sprint HTC Evo 4G

    DISCLAIMER: The views, conclusions, findings and opinions of this author are those of this author and do not necessarily reflect the views of eNVENT Technologies.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by gksmithlcw View Post
    It is important to pay attention to threats, yes, but to feel the need to point our aggression at a nation and say you are my number one enemy is just silly.
    Ahh, but we (those who are) aren't simply saying, "You number one enemy," we are also saying that it can be changed.

    Besides, what's the problem with calling it like it is? Simply stating, "silly" seems like a pretty weak response against such.
    No problem should ever be solved twice.

    Verizon Treo650 W/Custom ROM
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by DL.Cummings View Post
    Simply stating, "silly" seems like a pretty weak response against such.
    Just 'calling it like it is'... I know of no better way to describe it.

    And I see nothing wrong with calling it like it is but I don't think that saying Iran (or any one nation) is our number one enemy would be calling it like it is... I see it more as saying radical elements within the Middle East (and everywhere else) are our number one enemy. We need to focus on humanitarian efforts that thwart such radicalism instead of military efforts that create it.
    Grant Smith
    A+, Net+, MCPx2, BSIT/VC, MIS

    eNVENT Technologies
    Use your imagination.
    --
    Sprint HTC Evo 4G

    DISCLAIMER: The views, conclusions, findings and opinions of this author are those of this author and do not necessarily reflect the views of eNVENT Technologies.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by HobbesIsReal View Post
    DaThomas & Shop...

    ...But I am curious what each of you think is the most EXTERNAL threat we face now in the world today.
    An action on the part of those holding our national debt aimed at collection
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by shopharim View Post
    An action on the part of those holding our national debt aimed at collection
    interesting and insightful observation.

    Though the problem is kinda like the old banker problem: when you owe the bank $100, the bank owns you -- when you owe 100 Billion, you own the bank.

    To a degree, our debtors have a vested interest in us not completely collapsing.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by gksmithlcw View Post
    Just 'calling it like it is'... I know of no better way to describe it.
    Fair enough.

    I see it more as saying radical elements within the Middle East (and everywhere else) are our number one enemy.
    I agree, radical elements who make similar statements to:

    "We don't shy away from declaring Islam is ready to rule the world."

    For the record, that statement comes from Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the current President of Iran (which garnered my vote in this poll).

    We need to focus on humanitarian efforts that thwart such radicalism instead of military efforts that create it.
    Such as (examples)?
    Last edited by DL.Cummings; 04/01/2008 at 04:03 PM. Reason: clarification
    No problem should ever be solved twice.

    Verizon Treo650 W/Custom ROM
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by shopharim View Post
    An action on the part of those holding our national debt aimed at collection
    There is no such action. Our debt isn't callable by the creditor.

    They can sell the debt in bulk, which would lower the market price of that debt and lose them lots of money. When bond prices go down, interest rates go up. So it would increase the future borrowing costs of the US.

    They could also refuse to buy new US debt, which would also increase future borrowing costs.

    Note that neither action has any effect on the terms of existing debt. But since the US has plenty of short-term debt, it'll feel the market impact quickly.
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