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  1.    #1  
    ...or domestic for that matter. In case you haven't figured it out yet, I'm talking about one of the most important things in life. That's right ...beer. The fruit of Ninkasi. Proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy. So, what are some of your favorites and why? Please don't sully the thread with discussions of the Big Three (soon to be Two). I'll start:

    1) Anchor Old Foghorn - This is one of my all-time faves. Discovered it when I attended a homebrew competition and there was some provided during a seminar with Fritz Maytag, Pierre Celis, and a couple others. My tripmate and I stationed ourselves at a table in easy reach of the tap. It's a barleywine, so not for the beer newbie or faint of heart. Awesome maltiness. Sweet but well-balanced. I'm thankful to have recently discovered a local establishment serves it on draft and in growlers.

    2) Grimbergen (Double or Triple) - Another sentimental favorite. A Belgian abbey ale. The Double is a nice malty brown, with the Triple being a deceptively light-colored blond. A sensory delight. Having a Double at the moment.

    3) Abita Turbodog - Unfortunately, it's tough for the world to really get to experience this one in the way it deserves to be, since Abita Springs, Louisiana is about as out of the way as things can get. On draft at the brewpub or on the brewery tour, it's sublime. A mild brown ale, it's not the boldest or the strongest, but it's a much better endorsement of the region than Britney Spears.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  2. #2  
    beer discussion, eh?

    There only one: Pabst Blue Ribbon!
  3.    #3  
    I'd take a Dixie over PBR eight days a week. Thanks for participating at least.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  4. #4  
    I like Pyramid's Hefeweizen and their Apricot Ale as well.
    Sorry the flavor breakdon is a bit beyond me. Not an expert, just like em.
  5. #5  
    Black Butte Porter from Dechutes Brewery is by far the best domestic porter. Old Peculiar is my fav import. Now this is an OT topic I dig!
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    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by pdxtreo View Post
    Old Peculiar is my fav import. Now this is an OT topic I dig!
    Old Peculier isn't an import for some of us!! I find it a bit heavy for my taste; prefer Hogsback TEA, or Young's Special. Most English bitters are better on draught than in bottles (less gassy when you're having more than the odd sip or two!) so I'm not sure how well they travel.

    Had some nice microbrews when I was in New England a couple of years ago.
    PalmPilot Professional...Palm Vx...Treo 600...Treo 680...HTC Touch HD...iPhone 4S...
  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by pdxtreo View Post
    Black Butte Porter from Dechutes Brewery is by far the best domestic porter.
    Can't get Deschutes here, unfortunately.
    Old Peculiar is my fav import.
    Old Peculier is OK.
    Now this is an OT topic I dig!
    The sniping and politics can get a bit old.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  8.    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by tirk View Post
    Most English bitters are better on draught than in bottles (less gassy when you're having more than the odd sip or two!)
    Most beer in general is better on draught. Beer generally ages better in volume.
    so I'm not sure how well they travel.
    Fuller's is probably the easiest thing to find in these parts.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Toby View Post
    The sniping and politics can get a bit old.
    OT/

    Of course you say this now while sam-jeda is busy on the road.

    /OT

    Raise a glass of Duck Rabbit Milk Stout!
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Toby View Post
    Can't get Deschutes here, unfortunately.

    Old Peculier is OK.

    The sniping and politics can get a bit old.
    Toby,

    To each his own! I've had beer in Shreveport, not a pretty sight. PM your address and I'll send you a bottle of BBP if you promise to drink it cold.
  11. #11  
    Only three words need to be said:

    Newcastle
    Brown
    Ale
  12.    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by lifes2short View Post
    OT/

    Of course you say this now while sam-jeda is busy on the road.

    /OT
    You and your compatriots on the 'other side of the aisle' have your threads. It would be nice if you'd keep it out of this one.
    Raise a glass of Duck Rabbit Milk Stout!
    Elaborate please. Don't think I've heard of that brewery. Local?
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  13.    #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by pdxtreo View Post
    To each his own!
    There's certainly nothing wrong with Theakston's. Just not my thing.
    I've had beer in Shreveport, not a pretty sight.
    heh. Shreveport is definitely not my thing.
    PM your address and I'll send you a bottle of BBP if you promise to drink it cold.
    If you'd accept 45-50 degrees as cold, I'll take you up on that. I'll even send you a couple bottles from my next batches (brewing something this weekend or next) when they're ready, in return.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by Toby View Post
    You and your compatriots on the 'other side of the aisle' have your threads. It would be nice if you'd keep it out of this one.
    To the best of my knowledge, 'our side of the aisle' consists of individuals, not the character amalgam created by a bored former D&D Grand Wizard. I'll just leave it there.

    Elaborate please. Don't think I've heard of that brewery. Local?


    Found them at a craftbeer festival in Hickory, NC a few years ago. Haven't been able to find a superior stout, with the sole exception of Guinness (of course). They're selling retail now and worth the trouble to locate if stout is your thing.
  15.    #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by lifes2short View Post
    Found them at a craftbeer festival in Hickory, NC a few years ago. Haven't been able to find a superior stout, with the sole exception of Guinness (of course).
    Which Guinness? The 'Pub Draught' sold in the US is not particularly great, although it's OK on tap. The Extra Stout is better, but I'd have a hard time calling it superior as well. Mackeson is a pretty good stout with wide distribution in the States. From the US, the Rogue Chocolate and Shakespeare stouts are FG too. There are lots of others, but those should be pretty easy to find if you've not tried them.
    They're selling retail now and worth the trouble to locate if stout is your thing.
    It's definitely one of my things. I prefer the maltier ales and lagers (stouts, porters, scots and scotch ales, bocks, belgian abbey). Unfortunately, they seem to be limited to NC and TN at the moment. I'll just have to file it away for reference. I'm sure someone I know is bound to be in TN within the next year.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  16. #16  
    wow, what a nice change for an off topic thread.

    Concerning Guinness, I am not sure whether this is an urban beer legend, but its my understanding that Guinness gives their stout its distinct flavor by intentionally letting a portion of the beer go sour, then after pasteurization, the soured beer is added back to the main batch so that about 3-5% of the final volume contains the soured beer.

    A home brewer myself, I have tried to make a Guinness style stout, sans the soured component, and it was OK but my favorite stout was a full bodied variety mashed with both oatmeal, and unmalted barley, but the unique part about it was the small amount of raspberries I added during the second fermentation. The sugar from the raspberries fermented without giving any extra sweetness, but the smell of the raspberries and the slight taste of them really complemented the stout well. The head had a not overpowering smell of raspberries covered with dark chocolate.

    I also agree with the others who like porters. My favorite Porter was designed along the lines of Anchor porter, but I took a quarter pound of crystal malt and instead of toasting it in the oven, I smoked it on the barbeque with hickory chips for a little while, before adding it to the mash. It gave a slightly smokey taste to complement the dark full bodied slightly sweet taste of the porter well. It went really well with barbecued ribs.

    Like you Toby I really do appreciate Belgian beer, the Belgians are the true innovators of beer and the Trappiste Ales are especially good. I once cultured some Chimay red ale yeast right out of the bottle, and it really did give the final product I was brewing that distinctive Chimay Ale smell and taste. I would caution anyone who tries this not to add the Chimay yeast for the primary fermentation (its over does the Chimay taste too much) but just add a little at the time of bottling along with some unfermented malt syrup.

    Finally I would just like to put into a plug for Fred Eckhardt, who was a senior member of the Portland home brewers association I was lucky enough to be a part of during the heady home brewing days of the Pacific Northwest during the early 1990s. Fred was a true pioneer on home brewing who inspired all of us. His book "essentials of beer style" while dated now, is still a classic resource for home brewers and beer enthusiasts.

    http://www.amazon.com/Essentials-Bee...bosnation0e-20
  17.    #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by cellmatrix View Post
    Concerning Guinness, I am not sure whether this is an urban beer legend, but its my understanding that Guinness gives their stout its distinct flavor by intentionally letting a portion of the beer go sour, then after pasteurization, the soured beer is added back to the main batch so that about 3-5% of the final volume contains the soured beer.
    It was definitely true at one time according to everything I'm aware of. From what I understand, they won't confirm or deny if it's still done. I'd believe it's still done on the Extra Stout.
    A home brewer myself, I have tried to make a Guinness style stout, sans the soured component, and it was OK but my favorite stout was a full bodied variety mashed with both oatmeal, and unmalted barley, but the unique part about it was the small amount of raspberries I added during the second fermentation. The sugar from the raspberries fermented without giving any extra sweetness, but the smell of the raspberries and the slight taste of them really complemented the stout well. The head had a not overpowering smell of raspberries covered with dark chocolate.
    Don't suppose you still have the recipe? I'm not a huge raspberry fan, but my wife is. My personal favorite is still my Wake Up And Go To Sleep Stout. I think I may have to brew up a batch again soon. Hopefully the hop shortage won't make me modify the recipe.
    Like you Toby I really do appreciate Belgian beer, the Belgians are the true innovators of beer and the Trappiste Ales are especially good. I once cultured some Chimay red ale yeast right out of the bottle, and it really did give the final product I was brewing that distinctive Chimay Ale smell and taste. I would caution anyone who tries this not to add the Chimay yeast for the primary fermentation (its over does the Chimay taste too much) but just add a little at the time of bottling along with some unfermented malt syrup.
    I think there's a reason for that. ISTR the Chimay yeast added at bottling is not the exact same as the fermenting yeast.
    Finally I would just like to put into a plug for Fred Eckhardt, who was a senior member of the Portland home brewers association I was lucky enough to be a part of during the heady home brewing days of the Pacific Northwest during the early 1990s. Fred was a true pioneer on home brewing who inspired all of us. His book "essentials of beer style" while dated now, is still a classic resource for home brewers and beer enthusiasts.
    I met Fred a few times during the 90s. He was somewhat of a mascot for the Dixie Cup in Houston. Great guy. His sessions on beer/food pairing were always a hoot.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by Toby View Post
    Don't suppose you still have the recipe? I'm not a huge raspberry fan, but my wife is. My personal favorite is still my Wake Up And Go To Sleep Stout. I think I may have to brew up a batch again soon. Hopefully the hop shortage won't make me modify the recipe.
    One of the advantages of living in Portland is that you could grow your own hops, I had seven different variety plants that grew around my patio into an arbor and I would harvest and air them on a screen in my attic. Ah the good old days......anyway here is my recipe, perhaps you could share yours?

    Raspberry Stout
    5 gallons

    Ingredients:
    8 lbs 2 row British
    1 lb flaked barley
    1 lb roasted barley
    1/2 lb rolled oats
    1/2 tsp gypsum
    1 tsp calcium carbonate
    irish ale yeast from Wyeast
    45 grams loose eroica hops
    1/2 tsp irish moss (10 minutes)
    1 cup light molasses
    5 1/3 lb fresh red raspberries pasteurized 160 degrees 30 minutes.

    Notes:
    Step culture yeast from foil packet into an active 2/3 quart starter using dark malt extract medium boiled with a small amount cascade hops. Mash grains 2 hrs 150-152 degrees, mash out at 168 degrees. Boil wort 15 minutes, add hops, boil 60 minutes more, force cool, pitch yeast. Starting SpG is 1.060, primary ferment down to 1.020, rack to CO2 purged secondary fermenter containing cooled pasteurized raspberries.
  19.    #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by cellmatrix View Post
    One of the advantages of living in Portland is that you could grow your own hops, I had seven different variety plants that grew around my patio into an arbor and I would harvest and air them on a screen in my attic.
    Yeah, there aren't very many varieties that do well around here.
    Ah the good old days......anyway here is my recipe, perhaps you could share yours?
    heh. It's been on the web since 1995. I posted it in r.c.b. and it wound up all over the place, including The Cat's Meow 3. I did a search last night and was a bit surprised at how many hits it had. This is the original extract recipe. I've been meaning to update it for a long time to my current setup, but I just make the conversions mentally. The extract to all grain conversions are easy enough. The biggest change from the original that isn't straightforward is that I changed the coffee addition to a post boil steep in a fine-meshed nylon hop bag while the wort is cooling. The original recipe was a tad overpowering when young due to the tannins extracted from the short boil.

    Wake Up And Go To Sleep Stout

    Ingredients:
    4 # Dark Malt Extract
    3 # Light Malt Extract
    1/8 # Roasted Barley
    1/8 # Black Patent Malt
    1/4 # Chocolate Malt
    1 # Crystal Malt (90 lov)
    1 1/2 oz Northern Brewer Hops (Boiling)
    1/2 oz Willamette Hops (Finishing)
    2 1/2 cups Chocolate Cappucino (espresso ground)
    1 pkg Wyeast Irish Ale yeast

    Procedure:
    Steep roasted barley, black patent, chocolate, and crystal malts in 1 1/2 gallons of water while bringing to a boil. Remove grains before boil. Add dark and light extracts and boiling hops and boil for 60 minutes. Add coffee at the last 5-7 minutes of the boil. Add finishing hops at the last 2 minutes of the boil before racking to primary fermenter. Pitch yeast when cooled below 90 degrees F.
    Primary Fermentation: 5 days
    Secondary Fermentation: 10-14 days
    Add 3/4 cup corn sugar at bottling
    Age: about 6-8 weeks
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by Toby View Post
    Which Guinness? The 'Pub Draught' sold in the US is not particularly great, although it's OK on tap. The Extra Stout is better, but I'd have a hard time calling it superior as well. Mackeson is a pretty good stout with wide distribution in the States. From the US, the Rogue Chocolate and Shakespeare stouts are FG too. There are lots of others, but those should be pretty easy to find if you've not tried them.
    'Superior' was only used in reference to the Milk Stout, as Extra Stout is my personal gold standard. However, due to mileage and the need for healthier maintenance, I've turned my interests toward the dark bean as of several years ago. Not roasting (yet), but studying.

    It's definitely one of my things. I prefer the maltier ales and lagers (stouts, porters, scots and scotch ales, bocks, belgian abbey). Unfortunately, they seem to be limited to NC and TN at the moment. I'll just have to file it away for reference. I'm sure someone I know is bound to be in TN within the next year.
    I'm with you and CellMatrix as the Belgian Abbey, Chimay, and Trappiste Ales are in a quality class to themselves.
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