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  1.    #1  
    I speak as this planet’s most brilliant creature -- who despite his renowned wisdom, unmatched experience, and apposable toes would never be chosen in a free and fair democratic election.

    And its not just that I’m shorter than Dennis Kucinich, hairier than Duncan Hunter, or older than Mike Gravel. Its not that I’m a foreigner who speaks with a Corsican accent. We all know the truth -- which is that the reason I could never be elected leader is pure and simple: bigotry.

    Given my own experience as a victim, I’m interested in learning how a religion, an ethnicity, or a gender effect your feelings about a candidate.

    (from the left):

    How much would it matter if Al Gore was a Mormon, a Jew, or a Moslem ??

    How would it effect how you felt about him -- if he were Hispanic, Black, or a woman ???


    (from the right):

    How much would it matter if Reagan was a Mormon, a Jew, or a Moslem ??

    How would it effect how you felt about him -- if he were Hispanic, Black, or a woman ???


    -- oh, and tell me why...
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  2. #2  
    I think Obama is completely unelectable, and the democratic party is sabotaging themselves and their chances by supporting him.

    And yes, this is solely due to his race.

    There is plenty of research that shows voters are superficial.

    Surur
  3. #3  
    Ethnicity and gender are largely irrelevant to me. Religion makes an impact on my voting choices, though. I just can't really get behind an ultra-religious candidate, and I flat out will not vote for someone who makes their religion an issue in an election. One's religious views should not be used as a political tool.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by Toby View Post
    One's religious views should not be used as a political tool.
    Agreed!
  5. #5  
    Well, if one's religious views should not be used for political purposes, then someone please tell the Muslim gov't around the world..
  6. #6  
    "Given my own experience as a victim..."

    That statement speaks volumes...
    Last edited by mikec; 11/04/2007 at 11:50 AM.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by surur View Post
    I think Obama is completely unelectable, and the democratic party is sabotaging themselves and their chances by supporting him.

    And yes, this is solely due to his race.

    There is plenty of research that shows voters are superficial.

    Surur
    I hope you are wrong. The color of his skin should not matter. Nor should his name or how well it rhymes with other names matter. I agree with Toby that religion should not be a litmus test other than in determining if the candidate will be unable to separate their personal religious views from his/her duties to protect the freedom's off all Americans - and that includes the separation of church and state.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Toby View Post
    Ethnicity and gender are largely irrelevant to me. Religion makes an impact on my voting choices, though. I just can't really get behind an ultra-religious candidate, and I flat out will not vote for someone who makes their religion an issue in an election. One's religious views should not be used as a political tool.
    Ethnicity and gender are largely irrelevant to you. So, I guess race matters?
    at&t iPhone3G
  9. #9  
    To me, ethnicity, gender and religion play no part in my decision. However, for many it does.

    Hillary is not electable for one reason - people do not respect her. (Diasgreement and respect are two different things).

    Honestly, Obama is more electable than Hillary - he is likeable.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikec View Post
    To me, ethnicity, gender and religion play no part in my decision. However, for many it does.

    Hillary is not electable for one reason - people do not respect her. (Diasgreement and respect are two different things).

    Honestly, Obama is more electable than Hillary - he is likeable.

    Obama is definitely likeable. He IMHO just lacks experience...not that Hillary has a whole heck of a lot herself.
    at&t iPhone3G
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by moderateinny View Post
    I hope you are wrong. The color of his skin should not matter. Nor should his name or how well it rhymes with other names matter. I agree with Toby that religion should not be a litmus test other than in determining if the candidate will be unable to separate their personal religious views from his/her duties to protect the freedom's off all Americans - and that includes the separation of church and state.
    Fully agree, and I would expand the exclusion of any litmus test to any creed, color, gender as there is only one Constitution which serves as the standard bearer which the President is sworn to uphold. To set arbitrary bigoted limits on who can serve limits the greatness of our potential as a nation.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikec View Post
    Well, if one's religious views should not be used for political purposes, then someone please tell the Muslim gov't around the world..
    I don't recall being registered to vote for the Muslim gov't around the world.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by KStewart View Post
    Ethnicity and gender are largely irrelevant to you. So, I guess race matters?
    Non sequitur. The question only asked about ethnicity, gender, and religion. That being said, I think the concept of 'race' falls under ethnicity anyway.
    ‎"Is that suck and salvage the Kevin Costner method?" - Chris Matthews on Hardball, July 6, 2010. Wonder if he's talking about his oil device or his movie career...
  14. #14  
    Race, sex and religion to me is not important. Experience is important. Neither Hillary or Obama have any experience other than sitting in a Senate seat for a short period. Neither have run business, been involved previously in government, et cetera. Both are bad choices.

    Ben
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by bclinger View Post
    Race, sex and religion to me is not important. Experience is important. Neither Hillary or Obama have any experience other than sitting in a Senate seat for a short period. Neither have run business, been involved previously in government, et cetera. Both are bad choices.

    Ben
    Sounds like you'll be voting for Mike Bloomberg then! Let's hope he runs. Unless height is an issue?
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Toby View Post
    I don't recall being registered to vote for the Muslim gov't around the world.
    I was commenitng on the philosophy of the statement, which I think drives your voting choice.

    I was an ironic...we take separation of church and state fairly serious, where in other countries, it's the exact opposite.
  17. #17  
    People are all telling is what does or does not matter to them, but what do they think will matter to the electorate, the ones largely less principled than you.

    Surur
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by KStewart View Post
    Obama is definitely likeable. He IMHO just lacks experience...not that Hillary has a whole heck of a lot herself.

    I wonder why the experience question has become such an issue this election? The sitting President never touched a business that he didn't put into the ground and was only a Governor of a state. Both Clinton and Obama are sitting US Senators which holds more credence with me than running a state. Is this a double standard on the experience issue or can I consider this "lesson learned" in terms of voting for candidates with little or poor experiences?

    Then again...never mind. I think we should stick to the topic as Barye has outlined. Maybe I'll start a new topic/thread about the relevance of "experience" and what that experience should be to become US President.
  19. #19  
    I believe that most voters are not entirely thrilled with the choices (and have been for years) and will vote for the candidate whose ads and soundbites most closely align with the voter's self-interests.
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by moderateinny View Post
    I wonder why the experience question has become such an issue this election? The sitting President never touched a business that he didn't put into the ground and was only a Governor of a state. Both Clinton and Obama are sitting US Senators which holds more credence with me than running a state. Is this a double standard on the experience issue or can I consider this "lesson learned" in terms of voting for candidates with little or poor experiences?

    Then again...never mind. I think we should stick to the topic as Barye has outlined. Maybe I'll start a new topic/thread about the relevance of "experience" and what that experience should be to become US President.
    Not to mention that Hilary was the First Lady for two terms... Other than being an incumbent, I don't know how one could gain more experience.
    Grant Smith
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    eNVENT Technologies
    Use your imagination.
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    DISCLAIMER: The views, conclusions, findings and opinions of this author are those of this author and do not necessarily reflect the views of eNVENT Technologies.
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