Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 61 to 66 of 66
  1. gojeda's Avatar
    Posts
    93 Posts
    Global Posts
    104 Global Posts
    #61  
    Quote Originally Posted by Woof View Post
    If that is actually what is being said here, why are IRS agents not stationed at all baseball games and why are taxes not collected from all ball catching fans as they exit the stadium?
    Despite what some might tell you, if the IRS actually thought a baseball was taxable income when caught, they could deploy agents at each game. There are not that many baseball games going in a given night, and homeruns are easily tracked.

    Quite frankly, the answer is that the baseball, in an of itself, is not income. It is a baseball.

    If said fan had several identical balls in his possession and the "special ball" was not different or distinguishable upon inspection would the fan then be taxed on all the balls?
    Assuming, for the sake of arguement, that the balls are actually taxable, the answer here is if the IRS really wanted to forensically find out which ball it was - they could.

    If he threw the ball in the trash on the way out would he still be taxed, since it seems that the act of catching the ball is what qualified it as income?
    I would probably say no. The claim of incidental contact could be made.

    Where in the course of the balls flight from the end of the bat to the fans hands does it convert to income?
    Based on what some lawyers are saying, it becomes income when someone takes possession of the ball.

    For what event or action is the fan being compensated for with this income ball? If it is related to game attendance why are the rest of the fans not compensated and taxed? I have been to many major league games and have not been thusly compensated or taxed. Have I just been lucky or should I expect the IRS to eventually catch up with me?
    I think you have just figured out how ridiculous the notion of taxing a baseball is.
  2. #62  
    Quote Originally Posted by Woof
    For what event or action is the fan being compensated for with this income ball? If it is related to game attendance why are the rest of the fans not compensated and taxed? I have been to many major league games and have not been thusly compensated or taxed. Have I just been lucky or should I expect the IRS to eventually catch up with me?
    Quote Originally Posted by gojeda
    I think you have just figured out how ridiculous the notion of taxing a baseball is.
    Thank you. I was hoping that someone would see the utter ridiculousness of this idea.

    Samkin, my questions were largely tongue in cheek. I was hoping that no one would post serious answers to them. It saddens me that you feel there are serious answers to them.

    It saddens me further that anyone would find it acceptable that anyone could think that a baseball caught at a game could somehow be construed as income because it has the potential to be valuable. Does anyone see the complete stupidity here?

    Sorry Sam but I am with gojeda. Until I sell it and some retard decides it worth millions or whatever, it's just a baseball. Unless the IRS posts a ruling at the ballparks or on my ticket that says they can decide to tax a caught ball based on what they determine its value to be a the moment of their choice they can kiss my baseball loving ****. Until I see a specific and verifiable section of the tax code stating this, it's just a ball that I am taking home for my kid. A ball with a story, but just a ball nonetheless.
  3. #63  
    Quote Originally Posted by Woof View Post
    Thank you. I was hoping that someone would see the utter ridiculousness of this idea.

    Samkin, my questions were largely tongue in cheek. I was hoping that no one would post serious answers to them. It saddens me that you feel there are serious answers to them.

    It saddens me further that anyone would find it acceptable that anyone could think that a baseball caught at a game could somehow be construed as income because it has the potential to be valuable. Does anyone see the complete stupidity here?

    Sorry Sam but I am with gojeda. Until I sell it and some retard decides it worth millions or whatever, it's just a baseball. Unless the IRS posts a ruling at the ballparks or on my ticket that says they can decide to tax a caught ball based on what they determine its value to be a the moment of their choice they can kiss my baseball loving ****. Until I see a specific and verifiable section of the tax code stating this, it's just a ball that I am taking home for my kid. A ball with a story, but just a ball nonetheless.
    Sorry, but when you said, "I believe these to be valid questions. Please answer them as such," I tried to be respectful of you and take you seriously. Your questions weren't entirely silly; a lot of people would think of the same problems when thinking about tax law. And these types of questions do arise in real life. Also, gojeda apparently thinks it makes sense for the IRS to station agents at each game if it has taxes due.

    And let's be clear. I've never argued that it's "acceptable" or even the way it should be. I've just explained what the law is.

    You're making a different argument, that it's stupid, which I don't dispute. And whether you follow it is a different matter. There are many laws that people ignore, including copyright, speeding, jaywalking, etc. This is just one more.
  4. #64  
    Well said.
  5. #65  
    I bet you're just saying that to avoid getting sucked into a long, pointless discussion.
  6. #66  
    I find it sad/odd that people ask to be thanked. How genuine is it when you have to ask? It's like forcing your kid to call Grandma, to thank her for the new underwear she sent for their birthday.

    "To me, clowns aren't funny. In fact, they're kind of scary. I've wondered where this started and I think it goes back to the time I went to the circus, and a clown killed my dad.
    -Jack Handy, SNL-


Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Posting Permissions