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  1.    #1  
    Boston is steadily becoming THE force to be reckoned with. Regularly reaching the postseason, their manager francona is now a seasoned skipper.

    While the rockies have been on an unbelievable run, the eight days off may work against them.

    Josh Beckett looked fantastic in his last two starts, and the red sox hitting has been absolutely solid. Even the little guys are delivering in the clutch.

    Boston in six. Go sox!!!!
  2.    #2  
    And..... How can they possibly go wrong with a closer like Papelbon in the bullpen?!!!
  3. #3  
    sox in five,
    and I hate the sox.
  4. #4  
    Cant believe the O's let Kevin Millar throw out the first pitch in game 7 of the ALCS....no wonder the O's are disfunctional!
  5.    #5  
    I know that does seem a bit weird.
    But he seems to have brought good tidings to the Boston cause so far.....

    DAMN... 13 to 1 already in just the 5th. The sox may take it home in FOUR!!!!
  6. xdalaw's Avatar
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    #6  
    Go Sox! Sox in 5.
  7.    #7  
    2-0, baby. okajima plus papelbon.
    damn. just.....

    ...... damn...

  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by treosensei View Post
    Boston is steadily becoming THE force to be reckoned with. Regularly reaching the postseason, their manager francona is now a seasoned skipper.

    While the rockies have been on an unbelievable run, the eight days off may work against them.

    Josh Beckett looked fantastic in his last two starts, and the red sox hitting has been absolutely solid. Even the little guys are delivering in the clutch.

    Boston in six. Go sox!!!!
    Bite your tongue!
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by treosensei View Post
    Boston is steadily becoming THE force to be reckoned with. Regularly reaching the postseason, their manager francona is now a seasoned skipper.

    While the rockies have been on an unbelievable run, the eight days off may work against them.

    Josh Beckett looked fantastic in his last two starts, and the red sox hitting has been absolutely solid. Even the little guys are delivering in the clutch.

    Boston in six. Go sox!!!!
    From your mouth to God's ear.
  10.    #10  
    Whmurray, I'm going to have to go ahead and up my prediction to the sox in four after tonight.

    Best damn team in baseball right now. Solid.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by treosensei View Post
    Whmurray, I'm going to have to go ahead and up my prediction to the sox in four after tonight.

    Best damn team in baseball right now. Solid.
    I really would like for the Sox to win it in Boston. Give the Rockies a win or two in Denver.

    I got to see a game in that stadium last season. Like Arlington, it really is a nice stadium. Big. Modern. With a tip of the hat to tradition. Beer was great. Food, so so. (I would have paid a lot more for a better dining experience.)
  12.    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray View Post
    I really would like for the Sox to win it in Boston. Give the Rockies a win or two in Denver.

    I got to see a game in that stadium last season. Like Arlington, it really is a nice stadium. Big. Modern. With a tip of the hat to tradition. Beer was great. Food, so so. (I would have paid a lot more for a better dining experience.)
    Well, I do see your point. It would definitely be extra special to see them capture it all in Fenway. The way they are playing now though, this series will be short lived.

    I haven`t been to either Fenway or Mile High stadium. Hopefully, some day I`ll get the opportunity. When in Denver, which draught of beer would you kindly recommend?
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by treosensei View Post
    Well, I do see your point. It would definitely be extra special to see them capture it all in Fenway. The way they are playing now though, this series will be short lived.

    I haven`t been to either Fenway or Mile High stadium. Hopefully, some day I`ll get the opportunity. When in Denver, which draught of beer would you kindly recommend?
    (So nice of you to ask.)

    Well, the baseball stadium is called "Coors" Stadium. I guess the franchise came with the name. But a good beer is not just about what is in the keg but also about how the keg is stored, handled, and drawn. You can imagine that there is respect for the beer in a stadium named for one. Of course, it is served in plastic cups instead of steins, mugs, or schooners but the advantage is that you do not have to chill plastic cups.

    I still remember the first beer that I had from the "bottling cellar" at the old Jackson Brewing Company. The tax had already been paid on the beer in the bottling cellar so we weren't supposed to drink in there. The vats only had a little tiny spigot so it took a while to get any. When it rained I used to go through the cellar on my mail rounds, longer but dryer. The cellar master kept a few 32oz fruit juice cans for his own private use. One day he gave me one. I do not know whether it was so good because of the can, the big tank with the tiny spigot, or because it was illicit but it was memorable.

    After fifty years I still remember my first Michelob on tap in a frosted schooner. I am old and I still drink so I am blocking on the name of the place in Detroit (Caucus Club. My memory is very slow but deep.) where I had it but it will come to me after (before) I push send on this post.

    That brings us to Boston and Sam Adams Lager. Sam started out twenty years ago being brewed part time on "contract" but from a 19th century family recipe. The timing could not have been better. By 1985 most of the small local breweries had been driven out of business by a few big nationals and cheap rail. [New Orleans had four brewerys when I was a boy but only the Dixie Brewing Company survives today.] American beer was light gold in color and body and all brands tasted pretty much the same. At least by contrast, Sam was darker, heavier, and flavorful. Sam was one of the first and most successful of 600 "craft brewerys" that emerged in the next decade. Brewing really is craft and this movement saved the tradition of American beer.

    You asked a question that I love to answer.
    Last edited by whmurray; 10/28/2007 at 04:54 PM.
  14. gojeda's Avatar
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    #14  
    whmurray....

    Since you seem to be a conoisseur of my favorite beverage in this world, I wonder what is your take about the rather popular notion that Europe's beers are better than their American counterparts?
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by gojeda View Post
    whmurray....

    Since you seem to be a conoisseur of my favorite beverage in this world, I wonder what is your take about the rather popular notion that Europe's beers are better than their American counterparts?
    Well, I do not believe that there is a definitive answer. It has certainly been true as it was in 1985 when American craft was at its nadir.

    Europe has a lot of great beers and few mediocre ones. When I am there, I simply order the local brew by size and I am rarely disappointed. Only the large cities offer any choice anyway. Even in the large cities one chooses before going into the brasserie or pub and drinks what the innkeeper offers. Almost any European beer is superior to most of the beer in the US by volume but not by brand. The real problem is not that we do not have good beer but that Americans do not like good beer. As with their food, Americans care more that the beer taste as they expect to than that it taste good. I, on the other hand, appreciate variety in my beer; if it tastes the way I expect it to, then it is "American beer" and I am disappointed.

    I remember going to the Hofbrau Haus in Munich on one of my first trips over. It was not Oktober Fest, but like Mardi Gras conceals a lot of what is great about New Orleans, Oktober Fest merely exagerates what goes on in Munich all year long.

    The beer comes out of the cellar in real barrels, about the height of a man's chin and so big around that it would take the arms of three men and one small boy to encircle it. They bring it out on a big hand truck and roll it to the edge of the platform. It is tapped at the bottom and drawn by gravity rather than pump or pressute. There are always enough drinkers to empty the barrel before the beer gets warm.

    The Hofbrau Haus is a huge hall divided by hanging canvas curtains. They open up only as much of it as they need so that the atmosphere remains independent of the number of drinkers. Since they are open around the clock, they take sections out of service for cleaning. There is good German "comfort" food, good music, and lots of smoke to go with the beer. The tables are large and Europeans are more likely than Americans to fraternize with the others at their table. Since I was an American traveling alone, I was adopted by my table and the conversation switched to English.

    As I have already said, I do not drink beer in Europe by brand but I do drink European beer in the states by brand. I like many of the better known imports and will usually order local craft beer or an import in preference to a national brand. My favorite is Grolsch. It is a pleasure just to be in the same room with an open bottle of Grolsch.

    So, back to the original question. It is really sort of a "beer snob" question. Life is about good beer, not about what beer is better than another. It is about variety in beer rather than the best beer. However, ask yourself what beer the European will get in an American bar if he simply asks for "a pint." Is that the beer that you would want to represent American beer? Now do you appreciate the origin of the notion?
  16.    #16  
    World champions!!!! Sensational!!!!
  17.    #17  
    Thanks for such a fantastic reply earlier, whmurray. There IS something very special about a good, seasoned pint of brew with good company and good spirits at an event like the national past time....

    Ill be sure to request a cool, tall, carefully drawn draft of coors when I'm there in Denver someday. Looking forward to it now, after hearing about your experience.

    The other stop on my list is Germany. I've heard their seasonal festivities of beer and bratwurst are legendary, and make for the stuff of memories.

    I was in Bern a while back, but unfortunately didn't get a chance to take part at the time.

    I've found that certain brands of Belgian beer isn't too bad. I recently tried Hoesdarden which is a light, white ale... perfect after a long, hot day.

    While I was in philadelphia, I had dinner at "The City Tavern", in the historic district, which serves vintage revolutionary period drink and entrees.

    Ben Franklin's original recipe for beer is still served there, as well as those of Thomas Jefferson, George Washington and others.

    Ben's brew was very good. We enjoyed a pitcher of it, but Jefferson's and Washington's recipes were plainly awful.... very dark - steeped with molasses.

    Don't get me wrong, I've a soft spot for dark beer, but those bordered on undrinkable.

    Ever been to City tavern, in Philadephia?
  18. gojeda's Avatar
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    #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by treosensei View Post
    World champions!!!! Sensational!!!!
    Even though I dispise the Red Sox with the white-hot intensity of a thousand suns, their victory is well deserved. Good for them.
  19. gojeda's Avatar
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    #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray View Post
    Well, I do not believe that there is a definitive answer. It has certainly been true as it was in 1985 when American craft was at its nadir.

    Europe has a lot of great beers and few mediocre ones. When I am there, I simply order the local brew by size and I am rarely disappointed. Only the large cities offer any choice anyway. Even in the large cities one chooses before going into the brasserie or pub and drinks what the innkeeper offers. Almost any European beer is superior to most of the beer in the US by volume but not by brand. The real problem is not that we do not have good beer but that Americans do not like good beer. As with their food, Americans care more that the beer taste as they expect to than that it taste good. I, on the other hand, appreciate variety in my beer; if it tastes the way I expect it to, then it is "American beer" and I am disappointed.

    I remember going to the Hofbrau Haus in Munich on one of my first trips over. It was not Oktober Fest, but like Mardi Gras conceals a lot of what is great about New Orleans, Oktober Fest merely exagerates what goes on in Munich all year long.

    The beer comes out of the cellar in real barrels, about the height of a man's chin and so big around that it would take the arms of three men and one small boy to encircle it. They bring it out on a big hand truck and roll it to the edge of the platform. It is tapped at the bottom and drawn by gravity rather than pump or pressute. There are always enough drinkers to empty the barrel before the beer gets warm.

    The Hofbrau Haus is a huge hall divided by hanging canvas curtains. They open up only as much of it as they need so that the atmosphere remains independent of the number of drinkers. Since they are open around the clock, they take sections out of service for cleaning. There is good German "comfort" food, good music, and lots of smoke to go with the beer. The tables are large and Europeans are more likely than Americans to fraternize with the others at their table. Since I was an American traveling alone, I was adopted by my table and the conversation switched to English.

    As I have already said, I do not drink beer in Europe by brand but I do drink European beer in the states by brand. I like many of the better known imports and will usually order local craft beer or an import in preference to a national brand. My favorite is Grolsch. It is a pleasure just to be in the same room with an open bottle of Grolsch.

    So, back to the original question. It is really sort of a "beer snob" question. Life is about good beer, not about what beer is better than another. It is about variety in beer rather than the best beer. However, ask yourself what beer the European will get in an American bar if he simply asks for "a pint." Is that the beer that you would want to represent American beer? Now do you appreciate the origin of the notion?
    The interesting thing I have found in my travels throughout Europe is that places that are not known for good local beer *actually* has good (though not great) beer.

    In France, for example, it is possible to partake in a competent weizenbier. Spain offers an interesting mix. Barcelona has the well-regarded Voll-Damm. Sweden has a nice porter named Narke Kaggen Stormaktsporter. Belgium has their Struise Aardnon.

    It is that kind of variety that one simply doesn't find in America, although that is starting to change with a bunch of specialty brews from the West Coast.

    I simply cannot stand these flavored or seasonal brews, where they use chocolate or cherries......bleh....

    I argree with your sentinments regarding the nationals. I find very little use for the Budweisers of the world, but I do like my Samuel Adams. I share your take on Grolsch.

    Ultimately, my favorite 'everyday' beer vacillates between Beck's Dark and Bass Ale. The Dark I will have for dinner while I will indulge in the ale after being outdoors on a summer's day.

    On a cool night, though, I will nurse on a chilled stout while curled up in front of the TV.
  20.    #20  
    After watching the red sox` unbelievable comeback in '04, and now the amazing display of genuine team effort under pressure here in '07, it gives you the chills. The kind you got when you watched this as a kid.....



    Its a wonderful thing to be a sox fan right now.....
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