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  1. #141  
    Altman's Short Cuts, 3 hours of awesome, with superb music, too.
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  2. #142  
    Not tonight, but



    Majority of the movie 30 out of 100

    Last 5 minutes 99 out of 100

    Very very dark movie.
  3.    #143  
    is a fairly entertaining, sometimes engaging, sincere attempt at a slightly off- beat romantic comedy.

    James L. Brooks the director, years ago made one of the greatest american films ever: Broadcast News. He was one of the original creators of The Simpsons.

    Sadly "How Do You Know" never reaches beyond being much more than just an okay film.

    The story follows the uncertain paths toward love followed by a former woman softball star, a star ball player, and an unlucky guy whose life is in the middle of a meltdown.

    Shot amidst Washington DC and locations I know well, story orbits around Paul Rudd whose character is having the meltdown, and Reese Witherspoon, the girl he whom he desires.

    In some respects Rudd is reprising the role played by Albert Brooks in "Broadcast News", another film set in DC.

    Unfortunately neither the writing nor the story of "How Do You Know" ever reaches the funny and touching heights of "Broadcast News".

    A good date movie -- but I'd probably wait for Netflix.

    On a 0-100 scale, I'd give it a: 74


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  4.    #145  
    is an often amusing, weird sort of romantic comedy.

    It stars Jim Carey and Ewan McGregor as 2 men who meet in prison and who fall hopelessly in love with each other.

    Carey is slyly charming throughout, and his partnership with Ewan McGregor works when McGregor plays off of Carey as a foil.

    Apparently inspired by true events, it is unusual for a Hollywood film to have cast 2 such major male actors as the leads, in such an overtly gay film. (this fact may have contributed to the film's american release being delayed several times since at least last spring.)

    Its not until the end that its revealed that the movie was based on real events. I'd love to know how much creative liberty they took in bringing the real story to the screen.

    (FWIW, when I first heard the title I assumed the story had something to do w/cigarettes. It doesn't. We are left to presume that the title and the character's name just coincidentally happen to be the same as the giant tobacco company's.)


    On a 0-100 scale, I'd give it a: 78

    Last edited by BARYE; 12/10/2010 at 02:07 PM.
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  5. #146  
    I firmly think that previews show entirely too much these days. But they probably have to because people are so picky these days you have to give them a lot of the good stuff up front so they will come. That also probably explains why we as a country like prostitutes as well. Oh well, if the shoe fits......


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  6. #147  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeisnowonfire View Post
    I firmly think that previews show entirely too much these days. But they probably have to because people are so picky these days you have to give them a lot of the good stuff up front so they will come. That also probably explains why we as a country like prostitutes as well. Oh well, if the shoe fits......
    I'm convinced that they take every good scene in a movie and put it in the trailers. The more trailers they make, the more likely that the movie will be consistently good. Of course I'm kidding, but sometimes seems to be the case.

    It's like demo software.
  7. #148  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    I'm convinced that they take every good scene in a movie and put it in the trailers. The more trailers they make, the more likely that the movie will be consistently good. Of course I'm kidding, but sometimes seems to be the case.

    It's like demo software.
    I agree. And most of the time I see the movie and have already seen the best parts and figured most of it out. Which results in a waste of time and money. It's a shame.


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  8.    #149  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeisnowonfire View Post
    I firmly think that previews show entirely too much these days. ...
    I agree.

    When I'm unlucky enough to have to pay to attend a normal movie showing, they force you to sit through ten minutes of previews. They even mislead you as to the start time -- telling you that the movie begins at 8 -- when its really 8:10 -- following the compulsory preview watching.

    I hate previews so much that I will literally shield or close my eyes -- I don't want the preview 's information to warp and wreck my experience of the actual film.

    Thankfully since most of what I get to see are pre-release screenings, previews are not shown.
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  9.    #150  
    ...is a terrific, involving, gritty, and indelibly believable film.

    Its real to point of documentary. David O. Russell absolutely nails the snarl, the self pity, the ignorance of working class, blue collar Massachusetts.

    The overly made up, frizzy bleach haired females I knew growing up there -- the going nowhere, and in your face about it, guys -- maudlin guys with inferiority complexes as big as Harvard Yard.

    The performances are all, without exception, dead on believable -- sometimes painfully so. There are no pretty Hollywood actors here -- just characters who live this world.

    Christian Bale and Amy Adams are especially good. Mark Wahlberg acting is, if not the level of the others, thoroughly real.

    Mark Wahlberg is on every level a remarkable guy. A high school drop out, gang banger, and felon while in his teens -- he's evolved to become a brilliant creative force in Hollywood -- working closely with many great directors including Scorcese -- and creating my favorite drama/comedy series: HBO's "Entourage".

    There have been movies by the dozen made previously about the rise and fall of the scrappy fighter.

    The Wrestler, Million Dollar Baby, Rocky, On The Water Front -- and perhaps most famously, (the over rated) Raging Bull.

    The Fighter is the best "fight" film I've ever seen.

    Based on a real story of two boxing brothers from Lowell Massachusetts, the story never overstretches in pursuit of artificial drama.

    Director Russell who in the past made the incredibly under appreciated "Three Kings" -- about the dreadful aftermath of the first war against Iraq. We met and talked for about 20 minutes several years ago after the screening of one of his other films (I heart Huckerbees). An awesomely nice guy in person.

    He absolutely deserves to be nominated for a best director award for "The Fighter."

    2010 has been a very good year for film.

    On a 0-100 scale, I'd give it an: 86


    Last edited by BARYE; 12/17/2010 at 09:05 AM.
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  10.    #151  
    is a true disappointment.

    The Coen brothers have proven themselves to be talented directors. Their first film: "Blood Simple" is one of the greatest films ever.

    Fargo; No Country for Old Men; Burn After Reading; and The Big Lebowski are films that have passionate fans.

    I really liked Burn After Reading.

    True Grit is none of these.

    Its an anachronism in every sense of that term.

    True Grit is a recreation of the classic John Wayne western of the same name made in 1969. What of the original inspired such passion as to seduce such an endeavor as this, eludes me.

    Nor, fwiw, have I ever shared the nostalgia so many have for the american classic western. Its an affliction that has preoccupied even many foreign directors -- Japan's director Kurasawa's "Seven Samarai" and Sergio Leone's Italian spaghetti western homages, are just some that deserve mentioning.

    Westerns for me were simply grand operatic fairy tales that usually had little foundation in the west's actual history. They just served as a canvas onto which classic morality fables could be woven.

    The Coens have changed little fundamentally from the original -- perhaps the girl protagonist is younger, and more sharply defined. And she's an often charming and articulate performer. But I don't entirely buy into her 14 going on forty persona.

    I never thought I'd say this, but sadly Jeff Bridges is no John Wayne.

    And Matt Damon is out of place and time. A wasted role for him -- I never found him credible.

    The visuals are often grand, the writing is sometimes amusing -- but if you must see it I'd wait until its a Netflix download.

    On a 0-100 scale, I'd give it a: 73

    Last edited by BARYE; 12/17/2010 at 09:04 AM.
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  11. Micael's Avatar
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    #152  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    I never thought I'd say this, but sadly Jeff Bridges is no John Wayne.
    I was afraid of that. I'm a huge fan of both. One iconoclast trying to play a role created and performed magnificently by another.

    I'd imagined that it would be kind of like Led Zeppelin playing Pink Floyd's The Wall, and was waiting to hear the reviews before committing to go. Thanks for your input.
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  12.    #153  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    I was afraid of that. I'm a huge fan of both. One iconoclast trying to play a role created and performed magnificently by another.

    I'd imagined that it would be kind of like Led Zeppelin playing Pink Floyd's The Wall, and was waiting to hear the reviews before committing to go. Thanks for your input.
    I'm a fan of Jeff Bridges.

    Crazy Heart, The Men Who Stare at Goats, The Big Lebowski, The Fabulous Baker Boys -- and most importantly: The Last Picture Show, the first film I saw Bridges in.

    And though Wayne is an american icon, someone with a near mythic persona, he was never that for me.

    I always saw in Wayne someone slouching through a career regurgitating the same performance over and over -- hardly ever inhabiting the characters he was ostensibly portraying.

    Ironically, the one exception I can recall was True Grit -- where for once in his career Wayne took the bit in his teeth and charged at his character with abandon, unbridled and at full bore.

    Bridges was at an impossible disadvantage recreating that role in particular -- because its SO closely associated with Wayne.

    BTW -- anyone looking for a film to watch should absolutely get to see both The Last Picture Show and The Fabulous Baker Boys -- two brilliant films.
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  13. Micael's Avatar
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    #154  
    Yes, I can't explain why I loved John Wayne so much, but I did. I love just about every movie he ever played in, but some favs were/are: The Shootist, The Quiet Man, El Dorado, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, They Were Expendable, and The Cowboys.... I could list more.

    I know that his range and abilities were narrow. I'll sit and enjoy any of his films though.
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  14. #155  
    Tonight's movie: Once Upon a Time in Mexico
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  15.    #156  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    Yes, I can't explain why I loved John Wayne so much, but I did. I love just about every movie he ever played in, but some favs were/are: The Shootist, The Quiet Man, El Dorado, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, They Were Expendable, and The Cowboys.... I could list more.

    I know that his range and abilities were narrow. I'll sit and enjoy any of his films though.
    With the sad death this week of Bob Feller, there's something I can't resist mentioning in regard to Wayne. It has nothing to do with how I feel about him as an actor, but rather its how I feel about his image -- the heroic persona he has always had.

    Bob Feller, Jimmy Stewart, Ted Williams (and recently Pat Tillman) -- were men despite being privileged, rich, and able to avoid serving in war -- went out of their way to enlist.

    By doing what average men were called to do, they manifested true nobility and heroism.

    John Wayne and Ronald Reagan, in contrast, behaved ignobly. They spent the war posing as heroes, while actively avoiding service.

    I can never separate that fact from their personae.

    But in any event, I never liked either as actors -- irrespective of their personal hypocrisy and cowardice.
    Last edited by BARYE; 12/18/2010 at 06:23 AM.
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