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  1.    #1  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    Presidents are unbelievably influential to the performance of the national economy.

    The Clinton Prosperity is an excellent example.

    Clinton became President in part because of Ross Perot's campaign to publicize raygun & daddy bush's horrific budget deficit.

    Clinton resisted democratic pleas to increase spending on pet projects, while he increased taxes on america's wealthiest (in spite of GOP predictions that this would cause a depression.)

    In a few years this lead to a reversal that most thought was impossible: a national budget surplus.

    Despite full employment and booming growth, inflation was tame and the Fed felt empowered to lower interest rates to unremembered levels.

    The dollar was strong (a Euro was worth $.80), and crime even went down as more jobs became available in the inner cities.
    ...he ever worked with.

    I swear I had no part in writing Alan Greenspan's memoir. The former Federal Reserve Chairman, life long republican, and conservative hero has written a lengthy book in which he concurs with BARYE's appraisal of junior and Clinton. He in as much says that Clinton was one of our GREATEST Presidents, and junior is one of the worst.

    Alan Greenspan: a very smart human.


    Greenspan Is Critical Of Bush in Memoir
    Former Fed Chairman Has Praise for Clinton
    By Bob Woodward ; The Washington Post ; September 15, 2007; A01

    Alan Greenspan, who served as Federal Reserve chairman for 18 years and was the leading Republican economist for the past three decades, levels unusually harsh criticism at President Bush and the Republican Party in his new book, arguing that Bush abandoned the central conservative principle of fiscal restraint.

    ...Bill Clinton ... The former president emerges as the political hero of "The Age of Turbulence: Adventures in a New World," Greenspan's 531-page memoir...

    Greenspan, who had an eight-year alliance with Clinton and Democratic Treasury secretaries in the 1990s, praises Clinton's mind and his tough anti-deficit policies, calling the former president's 1993 economic plan "an act of political courage."

    But he expresses deep disappointment with Bush...

    Greenspan accuses the Republicans who presided over the party's majority in the House until last year of being too eager to tolerate excessive federal spending in exchange for political opportunity..."They swapped principle for power. They ended up with neither."...

    "House Speaker Hastert and House majority leader Tom DeLay seemed readily inclined to loosen the federal purse strings any time it might help add a few more seats to the Republican majority," he writes.

    Greenspan, 81, indirectly criticizes his friend and colleague from the Ford administration, Vice President Cheney. Former Bush Treasury Secretary Paul H. O'Neill has quoted Cheney as once saying, "Reagan proved deficits don't matter."

    Greenspan says, " 'Deficits don't matter,' to my chagrin became part of the Republicans' rhetoric."...
    ..."Little value was placed on rigorous economic policy debate or the weighing of long-term consequences." The large, anticipated federal budget surpluses that were the basis for Bush's initial $1.35 trillion tax cut "were gone six to nine months after George W. Bush took office." So Bush's goals "were no longer entirely appropriate. He continued to pursue his presidential campaign promises nonetheless."

    ...Washington ...[is] a dysfunctional government. . . . Governance has become dangerously dysfunctional."

    However, he calls Clinton a "risk taker" who had shown a "preference for dealing in facts," and presents Clinton and himself almost as soul mates. "Here was a fellow information hound. . . . We both read books and were curious and thoughtful about the world. . . . I never ceased to be surprised by his fascination with economic detail: the effect of Canadian lumber on housing prices and inflation. . . . He had an eye for the big picture too."

    Greenspan told the president. "The hard truth was that Reagan had borrowed from Clinton, and Clinton was having to pay it back. I was impressed that he did not seem to be trying to fudge reality to the extent politicians ordinarily do. He was forcing himself to live in the real world."


    Dealing with a budget surplus in his second term, Clinton proposed devoting the extra money to "save Social Security first." Greenspan writes, "I played no role in finding the answer, but I had to admire the one Clinton and his policymakers came up with."

    Known for his restrained if not incomprehensible public statements over the past several decades, Greenspan's direct criticism of Bush and his economic policies comes as the economy is emerging as an issue in the 2008 presidential race...

    ..."I am saddened that it is politically inconvenient to acknowledge what everyone knows: the Iraq war is largely about oil."
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  2. #2  
    By the end of today, I reckon Faux News will have instituted a network policy to constantly question Mr. Greenspan's sanity, character and patriotism whenever his name comes up.
    V > Vx > m505 > m515 > T/T > T3 > TC > 650 > 680
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  3. #3  
    Alan Greenspan one of the greatest financial minds ever.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Gamble View Post
    By the end of today, I reckon Faux News will have instituted a network policy to constantly question Mr. Greenspan's sanity, character and patriotism whenever his name comes up.
    Not to mention a few on this forum that will find a way to spin this and/or change the subject. e.g. "...but so and so says that Clinton was an *****. And the GOP ran the house...and blah blah blah".
  5.    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by moderateinny View Post
    Not to mention a few on this forum that will find a way to spin this and/or change the subject. e.g. "...but so and so says that Clinton was an *****. And the GOP ran the house...and blah blah blah".
    maybe maybe maybe they'll be like Greenspan:

    admitting that his worst mistake was supporting junior's and the repugnican's -- and their deficit creating tax cuts...
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    maybe maybe maybe they'll be like Greenspan:

    admitting that his worst mistake was supporting junior's and the repugnican's -- and their deficit creating tax cuts...
    But, don't you remember ****'s famous words? "Reagan proved that deficits don't matter". **** must've been assuming that everyone understood that this rule only applied to someone other than them. Who's left holding the bag (again)?
  7. #7  
    I like you guys.
  8. #8  
    Sad to see the trvth about a man who was held up as a demi-god.

    Clinton set woman's rights, teen development, and the honor of the presidency (and American gov't) back 50 years.

    Clinton showed no moral control and benefited from the "internet economy". Right place, right time.

    And the Iraq war was for oil? GMAFB. It's almost embarassing he said that. If it was, we would've invaded Saudi Arabia (who still to this day got off scot-free related to 9/11.) I'm still waiting for that cheap oil...

    People still don't get that WWIII started on 9/11. I suppose it's a testament to the fabric of the country that people have moved on so easily.

    The problem with war is everyone wants to play patty-cake and not see the reality. The enemy would rather cut your head off than talk about the impact of Canadian lumber. And if you are going to go in and wipe out a regime, you do it with so much overkill that the enemy says uncle.

    Sure the generals and Bush made mistakes - they all do. Disbanding the army and local police in Iraq was the number one mistake, because they know the people and area. But don't be so na´ve as to think a new Democrat/Republican/whatever will change things so the extemists will be all lovey-dovey.

    Sadly, if will take a few more "9/11s" of sigificant magnitude to wake people up.
  9. #9  
    If Clinton put respect for the precidency back 50 years Bush must have sent it to the middle ages.

    Surur
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikec View Post
    Sadly, if will take a few more "9/11s" of sigificant magnitude to wake people up.
    [OT]This, I can partially agree with. But, the first to awaken will be our sober government which will respond with a genuine war on the factors which create terrorist hostilities, thus defusing the current escalation of hatred. We need a chess player at the helm, not a checkers player.[/OT]
  11. #11  
    The middle ages is where fundamentalist Muslims are. That is the problem - that religion (unlike Christianity, Judaism, and other) has never had a reformation. Until that occurs, it'll be a mess.

    Clinton actually didn't set it back 50 years, he harmed it forever.

    Do I care that he banged a girl the age of his daughter? No. Do I care that he lied on national TV to all Americans? - Yes.
  12. #12  
    Do I care that he lied on national TV to all Americans? - Yes.
    "I am not a crook!"

    Surur
  13. #13  
    what president hasn't lied about who he has been banging? Hello that's men.

    At least he didn't lie to kill 3000+ americans and god knows how many Iraqi's.
  14. #14  
    Wait, let me get this straight- the third world war is against Islam, which is why attacking random moslem countries is the right thing to do?

    Surur
  15. #15  
    It's amazing what $60+ Million in investigative tax dollars will buy in results. If we compared apples to apples, I'd be interested to see what skeletons exist in each presidential closet. Then again, we may suffer a fate worse than a false, botched international campaign against propped-up enemies. Guess Bush screwed the pooch for us either way.
  16. #16  
    The war isn't against Islam. It's against Islamofascists.

    I would think someone living in Britain, who have had there share of tragedies, would know the difference.

    To the comment about us "creating" terrorist - news flash - we aren't. They already hate us just fine without any help.

    Nixon might have been lame, but he did more for US-Chinese relations than anyone else, laying the groundwork for our continuing flood of cheap consumer crap (now that human rights stuff is a different story..)
  17. #17  
    And you believe you can eradicate an idiology by force? Unless you are talking genocide this wont work. The chistians and jews are still around after all, arnt they, despite Nero et al.

    Surur
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by lifes2short View Post
    It's amazing what $60+ Million in investigative tax dollars will buy in results.
    Thank you! I doubt we could begin to fathom what $60MM in investigation dollars would reveal in the Bush administration.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikec View Post
    Clinton actually didn't set it back 50 years, he harmed it forever.

    Do I care that he banged a girl the age of his daughter? No. Do I care that he lied on national TV to all Americans? - Yes.
    Wow. You scare me more than the Taliban.

    The guy cheated on his wife and lied about it when asked in public. Who wouldn't? Well we now know that Newt wouldn't. Vitter wouldn't. Foley wouldn't. etc. etc. etc. Careful where you step...you're oozing gobs of hypocrisy and I wouldn't want you to step in it.

    Some of you guys on the right are so busy living in the past and you're moral outrage over Clinton you've literally gone blind to anything Bush or the GOP have done the last 6 years that DWARF that BJ or cigar thing.
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by surur View Post
    "I am not a crook!"

    Surur
    Actually in more modern times how about the soon to be classic, "The British government has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from Africa."

    Then there is the latest doozy by Bush and his selective memory:

    London, Sept.5 (ANI): A former envoy of President Bush has effectively called him a liar for his decision to disband the Iraqi Army.

    An angry Paul Bremer said that Bush's decision to disband the Iraqi army after the overthrow of Saddam Hussein was widely seen as one of America's biggest mistakes in post-war policy.

    He claims that this decision stoked rebellion among hundreds of thousands of former Iraqi soldiers who found themselves jobless. It also fuelled sectarian violence and left coalition forces completely responsible for security.

    In a book published yesterday, it has been claimed that Bush had intended "to keep the army intact" but that it "didn't happen".

    In revealing a letter he sent to the White House in May 2003, mentioning the plan to "dissolve Saddam's military and intelligence structures", Bremer said he wanted to refute the suggestion in the book Dead Certain: The Presidency of George W. Bush that he had acted against the President's wishes.

    In an interview with author Robert Draper, Bush sounded as if he was taken unawares by the decision to abolish the army and couldn't explain how it came about.

    He said his policy was initially for the Iraqi security forces to be retained and couldn't remember why that didn't happen.

    "Yeah, I can't remember," he is quoted as saying. "I'm sure I said, 'This is the policy, what happened?'."

    Bremer indicated he had been fuming for months over attempts by senior Bush officials to distance themselves from the order.

    He said he had discussed the proposal several times with former defence chief Donald Rumsfeld.

    He had also consulted with Rumsfeld's then deputy, Paul Wolfowitz, as well as the head of U.S forces in Iraq and the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

    He also said he discussed it with senior British military officials. "This didn't just pop out of my head," he told the New York Times.

    Mention of the army disbandment comes in the middle of the three-page letter sent to the White House on May 20, 2003, by Bremer.

    Bremer was unapologetic and angry about being cast as a renegade.

    The White House had no official comment last night.
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