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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by hoovs View Post
    But selective service is still in place.
    "Though the United States halted conscription in 1973, the Selective Service remains as a means to register American males upon reaching the age of 18 as a contingency should the measure be reintroduced. The registration requirement was suspended in April 1975, but reinstituted in 1980."
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas View Post
    "Though the United States halted conscription in 1973, the Selective Service remains as a means to register American males upon reaching the age of 18 as a contingency should the measure be reintroduced. The registration requirement was suspended in April 1975, but reinstituted in 1980."
    The U.S. military is not a "poor man's force."

    That's the conclusion Defense Department officials reached following examination of enlisted recruiting statistics gathered over the past year.

    "There is an issue of how representative of America is the force," said Curt Gilroy, the director of DoD's accessions policy in the Pentagon.

    DoD tracks "representativeness" - as Gilroy calls it - very closely. And representativeness can take a whole host of forms - race, education, social status, income, region and so on. "When you look at all of those, you find that the force is really quite representative of the country," he said in a recent interview. "It mirrors the country in many of these. And where it doesn't mirror America, it exceeds America."

    The data shows the force is more educated than the population at large.

    Servicemembers have high school diplomas or the general equivalency diploma. More servicemembers have some college than the typical 18- to 24-year-olds. "To carry representativeness to the extreme, we would have to have a less-educated force or we would want a lower-aptitude force," Gilroy said.
    http://usmilitary.about.com/od/joini...mographics.htm
  3. #23  
    Take a look at the US calendar:
    Memorial Day: remembrance for those who have died in our nation's service.
    Flag Day: commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States, which happened that day by resolution of the Second Continental Congress in 1777.
    Veterans Day: Is a holiday observed every year in the United States to honor all the men and women who served with the U.S. armed forces during the wars.
    I believe this country honors the soldiers who serve and sacrifice their lives.
    Why can’t we celebrate the ambiguous? The silly? The fun? The less-seriousness in our lives? Why is it that every time we allow ourselves to indulge in the “less important” we need to be reminded to be serious and honor what is important?
    Give me the ‘mote control and popcorn… I served my country for three years and I want to watch the Oscars. I think many soldiers in Iraq watched it too.
    Oh: And I love my country!
  4. #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by hoovs View Post
    The U.S. military is not a "poor man's force."[/url]
    I don't believe I said that.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by impish View Post
    Why can’t we celebrate the ambiguous? The silly? The fun? The less-seriousness in our lives? Why is it that every time we allow ourselves to indulge in the “less important” we need to be reminded to be serious and honor what is important?
    That’s what I say when I sit to watch the Oscars and get an earful of blather about global warming or whatever other issue is the cause célèbre at the time.
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas View Post
    I don't believe I said that.
    You didn't really say much, to be honest. Tell me at what point in time "military service was spread equally across all of society".
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by hoovs View Post
    You didn't really say much, to be honest. Tell me at what point in time "military service was spread equally across all of society".
    I don't really believe re-stating the obvious will benefit either one of us.
  8. #28  
    So you don't know what you were talking about, either?
  9. #29  
    I know this for sure. If there was a military draft, and people realized that they or their children were at risk, then there would be a lot less war mongering going on.
  10. #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas View Post
    I don't really believe re-stating the obvious will benefit either one of us.
    If you think the obvious answer is "never" then we're in agreement. But that just seems to negate your original assertion.
  11. #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by cellmatrix View Post
    If there was a military draft, and people realized that they or their children were at risk, then there would be a lot less war mongering going on.
    If that held true then it would also be true that the majority of the parents of our troops are against this war. Do you think that's the case?

    EDIT: On second thought, this just shows the benefit of an all volunteer service.
  12. #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by hoovs View Post
    If you think the obvious answer is "never" then we're in agreement. But that just seems to negate your original assertion.
    Of course it is unlikely we will ever see a completely even distribution of this burden but we have seen a more even distribution than we currently have.
  13. #33  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas View Post
    Of course it is unlikely we will ever see a completely even distribution of this burden but we have seen a more even distribution than we currently have.
    Where do you think the disparity is?
  14. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by hoovs View Post
    If that held true then it would also be true that the majority of the parents of our troops are against this war. Do you think that's the case?
    Nope.

    There are brave individuals and families who are truly patriotic and willing to serve, and there are cowardly war mongers who want others to fight for them.

    The draft would only adversely affect the latter category.
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    #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by surur View Post
    Yes, occupying another country is very unusual these days.

    Surur
    I think this must be a private argument.
    PalmPilot Professional...Palm Vx...Treo 600...Treo 680...HTC Touch HD...iPhone 4S...
  16. #36  
    Quote Originally Posted by cellmatrix View Post
    Nope.

    There are brave individuals and families who are truly patriotic and willing to serve, and there are cowardly war mongers who want others to fight for them.

    The draft would only adversely affect the latter category.
    But don't you think a quick study of the percentage of military families who are for this war as opposed to non-military families would help to prove/negate your point? For example, if it turned out that military families were far more likely to support this war than non-military families I think it would also hold true that a draft wouldn't dramatically change the public stance on the war. It might make non-military anti-war folks more vocal and it might push some of the few left who are still on the fence towards the anti-war side but thats about all.
  17. #37  
    Quote Originally Posted by hoovs View Post
    Where do you think the disparity is?
    I believe "... money for college ..." is the term used by the recruiting commercials. So logic would suggest to me that the disparity must exist somewhere areound there.

    Or we could just bring back conscription and have everyone do their two years between high school and college, end up with some money for college or base training in some form of skilled work AND have a citizenry with some basic self defense training and training in weapons handling.
  18. #38  
    Quote Originally Posted by hoovs View Post
    But don't you think a quick study of the percentage of military families who are for this war as opposed to non-military families would help to prove/negate your point? For example, if it turned out that military families were far more likely to support this war than non-military families I think it would also hold true that a draft wouldn't dramatically change the public stance on the war. It might make non-military anti-war folks more vocal and it might push some of the few left who are still on the fence towards the anti-war side but thats about all.
    Actually, when a larger cross section of your society has skin in the game they're less likely to invade another country.
  19. #39  
    Quote Originally Posted by tirk View Post
    I think this must be a private argument.
    Probably the less said, the better.

    Surur
  20. #40  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas View Post
    I believe "... money for college ..." is the term used by the recruiting commercials. So logic would suggest to me that the disparity must exist somewhere areound there.
    If you read the artice I posted you'll see: "More servicemembers have some college than the typical 18- to 24-year-olds."
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