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  1.    #1  
    Merriam Webster recognizes 'zeal' as the root of jealousy, defining the term in this manner:

    1 a : intolerant of rivalry or unfaithfulness b : disposed to suspect rivalry or unfaithfulness
    2 : hostile toward a rival or one believed to enjoy an advantage
    3 : vigilant in guarding a possession <new colonies were jealous of their new

    Envy, on the other hand is defined as:

    1 : painful or resentful awareness of an advantage enjoyed by another joined with a desire to possess the same advantage
    2 obsolete : MALICE
    3 : an object of envious notice or feeling

    While we often use these terms interchangeably, there is a key distinction. Envy focuses on what belongs to another, while jealousy focuses own what belongs to me--or better yet the preservation thereof.
  2. vw2002's Avatar
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    #2  
    Interesting. There are those who come to mind.....
    Last edited by vw2002; 01/19/2007 at 01:24 AM.
    I gotta have more cowbell
  3.    #3  
    So....

    Isn't the biblical description of God as being a jealous God an admirable, if not desireable, quality? Isn't it appropriate for God to be zealous about the universe in general, and us in particular?
  4. #4  
    yes, that's true. Sound Interesting...
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  5. #5  
    Jealous comes from 'zealous', envy comes from from 'invidere' - to eye maliciously. But that's irrelevant - meanings of words aren't kept in dictionaries, only past meanings of words. I mean look at 'vanilla' (go on, look it up).

    The current meanings of jealous and envious are pretty much the same, dictionaries are good for origins, not so good for keeping up to date. If you're studying a bible or other historical documents then a dictionary is a handy tool - just make sure the definitions are concurrent with the translation you're using.

    People pay too much respect to dictionaries, it annoys me.
    Animo et Fide
  6. #6  
    Must be a liberal. They're the only ones I know of that use words with whatever definition they want for that moment. Even a moment later the same word might mean something entirely different.
  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by PeterBrown View Post
    Jealous comes from 'zealous', envy comes from from 'invidere' - to eye maliciously. But that's irrelevant - meanings of words aren't kept in dictionaries, only past meanings of words. I mean look at 'vanilla' (go on, look it up).

    The current meanings of jealous and envious are pretty much the same, dictionaries are good for origins, not so good for keeping up to date. If you're studying a bible or other historical documents then a dictionary is a handy tool - just make sure the definitions are concurrent with the translation you're using.

    People pay too much respect to dictionaries, it annoys me.
    Your observation points to the notion behind my original post. One could read the Bible today, and interpret jealousy as it is commonly used today, rather than how it, or, more importantly, the aramaic term, was used during that period.

    One of the key principles of literature study, especially needful for Bible study, is understanding first how the message would have been understood by the then "present" audience. That provides context for translation and/or application.

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